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  • riping walnut in half

    I have some rough cut walnut that is 15/16"x7". I want to rip it in half. I put a rip blade into the table saw and set the blade as high as it will go. It cut good for about 2 1/2" than stoped cutting. When I drop the blade down to about 3" it cut all the way through. What am I doing or not doing that keeps it from cutting the board in half?

  • #2
    try another pass with the blade raised up some more and see if it cuts the remainder. Then flip it over and do the other side the same way.
    Maybe it was just toooo big a bite for one pass.
    Just be careful. Cripes, it isn't worth loosing a finger or more.
    Pacifism is great, as long as everyone is participating.



    StephenD


    The Southern Arizona Woodturners Association
    Desert Woodcrafters
    Grandpa for the 7 most amazing children.

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    • #3
      It sounds like to me your rip fence is not square to the blade. Make sure it is square to the blade and use push sticks. Keep your fingers clear.
      "Still Montana Mike"

      "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
      Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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      • #4
        Please becareful, I had one kick back on me a long time ago, lucky I wasn't hurt.
        Only resaw with my bandsaw now.

        Bob
        Delta P-20 & Q-3

        I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me!

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        • #5
          StephenD - I had the blade at 2 1/2" and made a cut an then turned the blank (which is 7" sq) until I had all four sides cut. Then I raised the blade up 1/2" more an it wouldn't cut.

          Wood-n-things - I just checked the rip fence an it is square. An yes I am using push sticks.

          Greenfield_Bob - I just finished the cut using the band saw an it cut it ok. Only had about 2" in the middle to cut. Is there a blade for the band saw that is made for riping boards in half? Making a 1" board into a 1/2" board.

          Thanks for all your advice. I just hate seeing all that walnut going in my planer.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Trackman View Post
            Is there a blade for the band saw that is made for riping boards in half? Making a 1" board into a 1/2" board.
            Try this link: Wood Slicer Resaw Bandsaw Blades 1/2" (70.5" to 137") | Bandsaw Blades

            This is what I use. They rip so much better than regular blades.
            Ron
            www.turtleteasers.com

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            • #7
              Resawing on a table saw requires a lot of things to be aligned and set up correctly. First word of advice would be to take smaller bites. Raise the saw up to cut no more than 1" or so at a time. This will make it easier to keep the kerf clear and be less strain on the saw. It will take longer, but will be safer. Once you have cut as far as you can on one edge, flip it over to do the same thing on the other edge. But, instead of trying to cut the whole way through, you should leave a 1/2" or more in the center, holding the two sections together. This should then be finished with a handsaw. Trying to cut this all the way through on the table saw can be tricky, as you are trying to hold everything together and balancing it on a thin edge. One reason you may have stalled the saw is that the wood may be binding on the blade. If that is the case, when it does come apart, it may go in directions you aren't expecting. THis is a recipe for disaster. Play it safe.

              The bandsaw is the preferred tool for resawing. You should get a blade with about 3 TPI. YOu should have some manner of rip fence that allows you to hold the board firmly against it and keep it in a perfectly vertical plane with the blade. If the bandsaw has some drift (like a scroll saw blade, pulling to one side), you'll need to compensate for that. There are ways to adapt a bandsaw resaw fence to accomodate for drift to improve your results.

              Good luck and be careful!
              Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

              Comment


              • #8
                I had no Idea you had access to a bandsaw. if I had known that I would never have suggested even continuing with the table saw. As said recipe for disaster. Always use the best tool for the job when you can and re-sawing should be done on a band saw if at all possible.
                "Still Montana Mike"

                "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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                • #9
                  There you are, if you are new to woodworking you don't know what is the best tool to use. I have ordered a band saw blade that Ron said he uses and will use my 12" band saw from how on. Thanks again!

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                  • #10
                    Trackman, here is where I get my bandsaw blades.

                    Suffolk Machinery - Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blades

                    Bob
                    Delta P-20 & Q-3

                    I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Band saws are the way to rip lumber, especially if its' rough. Trackman, having a 15/16 piece of wood tells me you have a rough piece of lumber and not a "milled" piece of wood. That is why your table saw was binding and couldn't cut. The wood has to sit on your table saw perfectly flat to successfully cut it. If the wood is not milled, you may think its' flat on one side and it may not rock any at first because it may be sitting on 4 high points like a table. But once you start your cut, a stable piece of rough lumber can become unstable very fast. Then it will bind in a lower powered saw or kick back in a powerhouse table saw. Next time you need to plane a flat side truly flat - or go to your band saw.

                      Band saws are great for ripping lumber. But as stated, the blade tends to wander. Besides getting a blade with particular TPI, you need to get the widest blade your saw will accept. The wider the blade, the more stable it will be. Now by width, I'm not talking about thickness, I'm talking about the width of it looking at it side ways or the length of the blade from the front teeth to the back of the blade.

                      As for the band saw fence, the best fence for ripping rough lumber is one with a knob, ridge or bulge right at the point that is parallel with the teeth. With this type of set up, you can move the wood from right to left with your hand as your pushing it through the blade. That will compensate for the drift.

                      One last piece of advise... if you got through your initial rip with perfect results, you now have 1 milled side of a 4 sided piece of wood. Depending on what you want to do with it, you may need to get all 4 sides planned. In the future, don't be afraid to buy finished lumber if you don't understand what I'm trying to tell you. But if you want to learn, I'm willing to continue this conversation. The only problem I have is I can't seem to get email notification on the posts I have done on this site, even after setting up the email notification on the "go Advanced" button. I'll try to keep checking - or email me.
                      It's never hot or cold in NH, it's always seasonal!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Trackman View Post
                        There you are, if you are new to woodworking you don't know what is the best tool to use.!
                        Glad you came here and asked. Now you know and perhaps we can all share more information. We are an extended family or team. Glad you are broadening your methods in the shop. Re-sawing can save you loads of money. Now if you don't have one get a good jointer or planer.

                        FYI Grizzly has a good jointer on clearance right now.
                        "Still Montana Mike"

                        "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                        Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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                        • #13
                          I just got a new Timberwolf blade for my bandsaw (Delta with the riser) 3TPI x 1/2 inch blade and I just sliced through 7" of walnut like butter.
                          Our local supplier is a distributor Long Island Woodworker's Supply
                          Rolf
                          RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                          Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                          Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                          And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Trackman View Post
                            There you are, if you are new to woodworking you don't know what is the best tool to use. I have ordered a band saw blade that Ron said he uses and will use my 12" band saw from how on. Thanks again!
                            Good, now you are on the right track. Bernie's advice on resawing is good. A resaw fence that allows you to compensate for drift will help a lot. If I'm resawing roughcut lumber, I usually like to joint/plane both faces flat before I resaw. Then I know exactly how much thickness I have to work with and I can get maximum yield out of the piece. Also having a smooth, flat face to ride against the fence helps a lot.

                            When you have your blade installed, take special care to adjust your upper & lower guides as precisely as possible. Also, proper tension is critical to getting good resaw results as well. For a 1/2" wide blade, you will need a good bit of tension to get it to cut true. Blade manufacturers will normally provide guidelines on how to properly tension their blades. At least I know Suffolk Machinery does. So follow them closely, along with the setup instructions in your saws manual.


                            Come back with any more questions you might have and let us know how it works out for you.
                            Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                            • #15
                              I went to a auction that had more board feet of lumber than Lowes!! Oak, walnut, cherry and ash. The man had his own small saw mill he took to the woods. That is why I have so much rough cut lumber.

                              I do have a planer and like I said in past post have gotten the proper blade for my band saw.

                              I sure am thinkful for all the advice I have gotten on this subject. This is one H--- of a forum for information!! Thanks

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