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  • Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

    Hi,
    A few of my trees in my yard where blown over by wind, and/or struck by lighting. The trees names are 'Flowering Pair'. I can't seem to find it in any books. Also I only know of one website that sells them. I want to dry them and then carve them, or make tables out of them. Why are these 'Flowering Pairs' not used for carving? What is the wood used for, I have unbeleiveable amounts of this wood and won't throw it away. Thank you

  • #2
    Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

    bcarvings,
    Do you mean Flowering Pear if so yes its quite carvable in fact it carves really nice. The only problem with it is that it checks really bad I posted a picture of a carving I did out of a wild Flowering Pear I believe its on the woodspirit album it was in the spring. The heart wood it a beautiful peach color I had a lot of fun carving it.
    Colin

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    • #3
      Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

      Sorry I was having a seniors moment disregard the last post. It was wild plum that I carved not wild pear.
      Colin ??? ??? ???

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      • #4
        Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

        I believe it's called a Bradford Pear. I have read someplace (maybe here) that pear is carvable.

        You should strip the bark off and seal the ends of the pieces before drying them. Depending on the thickness, it could take several years for it to completely dry.

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        • #5
          Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

          I believe there was an evaluation of pear wood a couple years back in WCI in which it was given 3 1/2 stars.....maybe it was 3, but I do remember it was reated as an excellent carving wood. I remember because my neighbor cut one down and asked me about it right after the mag came out. Unfortunatley the trunk of his was badly deteriorated so I never did get to try.

          Al

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          • #6
            Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

            Pear is a very fine grained wood, hard and is perfect for ship modelling. It can be carved and carved well, but it a very hard wood, so your tool angle needs to be adjusted.

            Prepare your wood now, as soon as it has been cut down. Get the bark off, slab it and split/cut it into manageable size billits and wax the ends, then stack them using spacers to dry and let the air circulate around and through them. In a couple of years they'll be perfect. Some suggest that you can carve them green and they are probably correct, but I like my wood dry and stable first.

            Pear is a ship modellers dream , so if you have some left over, my address is............

            Good luck with your 'windfall', better than any lottery!

            Bob

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            • #7
              Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

              I second everything squbrigg said: I've had a bit of experience with the stuff and it will check badly unless you do as he says. I do recommend spliting it with wedges vice sawing it. The reason is that when split with wedges, it will split with the grain, usually along a grain line that would normally check. Whereas if you saw it, you violate those grain lines. Around here you can get wedges in Wal-Mart for a couple dollars. A pair should set you back less that $10.

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              • #8
                Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

                I tried doing some carving on a Pear wood limb, which was green. I was shapping it with a Dremmel tool.

                The wood was so hard, I finally threw the 10 inch limb section away. I guess so much for working with green wood.

                This is a hobby where you live and learn and learn and learn.
                Jim - The Doing is as much fun as the Viewing!
                Jackson, MS

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                • #9
                  Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

                  Ohhhh noooo! Throw wood away!!! Pear wood at that!!! Pull my hear out and thump my head on a wall ........blasphemy!

                  Green wood will dry, just needs a little time and patience. What a beautiful wood Pear is too! Power carve it lad, but never throw it away. :'( Just think of all those beautiful ship model carvings I could do with Pear!

                  Bob

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                  • #10
                    Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

                    Hey Bob, I realize now that throwing away the pear wood was probably a sin. I was a BAAAD Boy :-[

                    However, my Mother has a couple of Pear trees on her property which have branches that break off annually.

                    Do you suggest me collecting those and letting them set for a year or so before trying to work with them.

                    I just about ruined several of my Dremmel bits working on that last piece. I don't think they are large enough to make ships. The branches are typically less than an inch or 2 in diameter.

                    Thanks for your in-sights.
                    Jim - The Doing is as much fun as the Viewing!
                    Jackson, MS

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                    • #11
                      Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

                      The wood I suggest saving, would have to be very large branches or preferrbly trunk wood. Cut in about 2' lengths, debark, split at least once or cut into 2' thick planks and wax the ends to prevent checking. Then stack for air drying and let sit for a couple of years.

                      The wood I use for shipmodelling is ripped into planking of from 1/32' , 1/16', or 1/8' thick, and various widths. The length isn't very important, as they will be cut into lengths anywhere from 2' to 12' or at most 18'. Pear is so fine grained, that it carves well for ship model carvings, power carving probably, but some edged tool carving as well.

                      For example, the bow scroll work for the model I'm working on right now, is only 1/32' thick, 1/4' wide and about 1 1/2' long. Once carved, it had to be steam bent into the curved recess where it was glued in place.

                      What happened to your Dremmel burrs that you had to throw them away? Did the green wood gum them up too bad? You could clean them with spray oven cleaner, or use a propane torch on them , depending on their type (ruby, diamond, carbide?).

                      I just hate to hear of wood being thrown out.....sorry. My basement is like a packrats burrow! Bits and pieces everywhere.

                      Best of luck,

                      Bob

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                      • #12
                        Jim - The Doing is as much fun as the Viewing!
                        Jackson, MS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

                          Jim,

                          All fruit trees make good carving wood. Some just better than others. I like working with seasoned wood, though some folks like working the green stuff. All a matter of learning the properties of the wood and adapting your techniques to them. If green wood clogs up your burrs then switch to edge tools. Just takes longer and you take smaller bites!

                          As for being knowledgable, I've been around wood for a while and tried to pay attention. The good Lord gave me one mouth and two ears, so I try to use them proportionately. The first lesson I learned as a young nipper was that I knew enough to know that I don't know much! (Hummm.....does that make sense? Now I've got myself confused! :-/ )

                          Enjoy your wood carving, experience comes with time and effort.

                          Bob

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                          • #14
                            Re: Uses for a Flowering Pair Tree?

                            Sorta like a few wise men have said, 'There are known knowns & there are known unknowns but the tricky part is the unknown unknowns'. ???

                            I don't mean to hog the stage, (talk too much) but it is nice to talk to people that know what they are talking about! & I can learn from

                            Thanks for your patience!!! I've got a lot to learn, but I am enjoying the process!

                            Jim
                            Jim - The Doing is as much fun as the Viewing!
                            Jackson, MS

                            Comment

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