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  • Blade storage

    Out of curiosity, how do you store your extra blades ?

  • #2
    I keep mine in the plastic envelopes tucked away in a plastic box. I do want to make a storage rack so I can see them easier.

    I am not sure if I will make it out of wood or corrugated plastic.
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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    • #3
      I think it would be too kind to describe my blades as being 'stored' ; they're stuffed higgeldy-piggedly in a drawer.

      Like Carl, I'm planning to make a proper storage container but it seems to be on my round tuit list. That said, I've already got some plastic pipe ready to cut to size, so it may happen soon when the weather warms up.

      Gill
      There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
      (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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      • #4
        I have a tool shelf with storage tubes that I have on the side of my saw.Then I have blade storage tubes in my scroll saw drawer that I have built into my workbench. I need to clean that out so that it only has my scroll saw stuffin it.

        Kevin
        When you hit rock bottom the only answer is to look up

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        • #5
          My solution:

          Big Orange Retail Giant (BORG) had inexpensive PVC 1/2 I.D. pipe and a whole tray of end caps. Since I had one of thoes PVC pipe hand cutters, away I went making a drawer full of 5.5 inch PVC pipe tubes with end caps (didn't even need to glue the end caps on.)

          Then I tried marking the tubes; #$%# *$*% (*&## and other such terms of enderment for my idea. Discovered there is a product call 'Paint Stick' from Industrial Supply Houses (McMaster Carr.) Like a Felt Tip Pen but the 'ink' is an oil based Paint. I was able to get hold of several used sticks at work that were almost empty. I am sure most members of this forum don't have access to paint sticks.

          PVC pipe marking is the major draw back for my idea.

          Of course the other draw back is the tubes roll around everytime the drawer is opened. Since I am sometimes lazy, I just tried to make a flat on a side of the end caps with a belt sander. Now I have to mess around with alignment of the flats. Oh bother!!

          Phil

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          • #6
            I made my blade holders out of PVC abd end caps - but I taped the bottom end shut instead of using caps on both ends- and I took the label off my sleeve the blade came in and taped it with clear packing tape on my tube. This gives me all the info on the blade inside and keeps it organized. I keep these in a little box I made sitting next to my saw. But a better idea would be to make a holder using a forsner bit ..keeping all the brands and types in a neat little row. I know I need to but just haven't built the new holder yet.Wouldn't be hard to make just have the lazyes. Oh and tape over the lable on the tube so it won't get ruined from dirt or wear.
            Sharon
            PS PVC cuts real easy on the saw --and keep your new tubes standing up for easy accesseseseses
            Last edited by SharonW0111; 03-19-2006, 10:27 AM.

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            • #7
              Here's how I did it;
              In the wine making supplies department of a grocery store I bought some of the long clear ridgid tubes they use for syphoning wine from 5 gal. carboys. I cut them in pieces and glued them into drilled holes in a wall shelf and put labels at the base of them with tooth size and style and make.
              The shelf is actually 20 tubes long but I couldn't get it all in the picture. When the surplus of my back-up stock that is stored behind will all fit into its respective tubes I know it is time to order more.
              W.Y.

              http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

              The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

              Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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              • #8
                just used an 2ft 2x4 :-)

                I just drilled some holes with a spade bit through a 2x4 and set it on my bench lol :-)


                Charlie,
                Charlie
                "Everything Happens for a Reason"
                Craftsman 18in. 21609

                http://wolfmooncreations.weebly.com

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                • #9
                  I store mine in plastic tubes and they hang from peg board on my workbench.
                  Bill
                  Delta P-20

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                  • #10
                    The reason why I asked is I came across about 100 - 1/2" OD clear plastic tubes with black rubber caps. They are about 8 1/2" now but I cut the ones pictured to 6" on the scroll saw, sanded the end flat with a 1" benchtop belt sander and hand sanded the burr off the edge by hand with 300 grit. I also color coded the caps with colored electrical tape. Labels could allways be made on the computer to size and clear taped as mentioned. If anyone wants any of these 8 1/2" tubes with black caps let me know and maybe we can work out some kind of a deal. My e:mail address is [email protected]

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                    • #11
                      mine are in their plastic sleeves except the current opened dozen, with lay halfway bundled inside of plastic little drawers in one of those simple elcheapo storage bin organizer thingys, one size and type per drawer.When I pull out the last dozen, its order time.
                      Dale w/ yella saws

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                      • #12
                        Storage

                        I buy mine in bulk that come in 6" x 1.5" Zip-Lock bags.

                        I spray a bit of wD-40 for the blade not to rust and close the Zip-lock. WD-40 keep the blades oilded and also chase the humidity and the Zip-lock keeps the wd-40 inside. I wipe the blade downward (so the theet don't get trapped into the cotton cloth) just before to install them. No oil residue remain on the blade.

                        One of my friend uses single cigar containers.

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                        • #13
                          Awwwwww...

                          Now you got me thinking of making a storage box for the blades I just received.

                          It should be practical, accessible, have enough room for different size and type of blades and it should show my workmanship.

                          And since I'm not going to give it away or sell it, I should consider making it as a gift of love to myself. In other words: I should make it nice.

                          Hmmmmm... To the drawing board.

                          I'll post pictures when it's done.

                          Regards,
                          Marcel
                          http://marleb.com
                          DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                          NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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                          • #14
                            Because of the size and similarity of these blades, I elected to buy some 1/2 plastic tubes from Lee Valley and some of their 1/2 router bit holders and then drill about 9/16 holes in a peiece of wood, insert the bit holders from the bottom and the 1/2 tubes from the top. Also put a bottom on it to keep the router bit holders in place. I also made up computer labels to insert in the tubes to include the Blade #, type etc etc..

                            My bigger problem was to save those somewhat used blades and keep track of what blade I currently have in the saw. To rectify this I cut some angled slots in a piece of oak (extra from hardwood flooring) and labeled pieces of plastic, similair to what is on the tube label, and placed them in each slot. Then as blades get partially used I simply lay them in the respective slot. Depending on what blade is in use, I move its respective plastic label to the front slot.

                            I have pasted a picture to help show you what I mean. This may be overkill but it sure works for me.
                            Attached Files
                            Scrolling satisfies the passion for intricate creativity. My saw is an Excalibur EX21.

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                            • #15
                              Hi Bob,

                              I was going to use the 1/2 inch tubes I have also, along with some 3/8 I had.

                              I like the idea for the used blade support, with the plastic cards. Makes great sense.

                              Congrats on a nice design
                              Marcel.
                              http://marleb.com
                              DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                              NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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