Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

need saw suggestions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • need saw suggestions

    I need to buy a scroll saw that can use the round blades and also has a guard that covers the entire blade, for use by disabled people. Thank you in advance!

  • #2
    Vickie -- round as in spiral?? and disabled as in which way -- I am disabled and do very well with my Craftsman 16" VS -- the "tooless" clamp has a trick to it and it is a easy fix if you don't have arm strength or good finger cordination - as for putting in a blade I have found plastic hemastephs hold the blade and gives me both hands when I need the extra help. I have made a good wrench out of pvc and a pvc cap and a dowel to tighten the set screw. if you need any help just holler.
    Sharon

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Sharon

      Hi Sharon, thanks so much for your reply. We are setting up a workshop for developmentally disabled people, and those who will be using the saw don't have physical limitations, it's just a precaution. The safer the better. We had a Craftsman saw with a good guard, but it wouldn't accept the spiral (thanks for that) blade, so we're having to find another saw. Our local Sears says they don't have anything that will work for us. So is VS the model and does it accept the spiral blades? Vicki

      Comment


      • #4
        Oh gosh Vicky I should say so -- You may have one of the saws that only accepts pinned blades - spirals are pinless- But Sears has a blade adapter that will replace the pined holder. It is $26. and fits any of their saws that won't accept pinless - and spirals. I have one for my Central Machine scroll saw and I really like it . You do have a flat metal to metal clamp that the blades fit in and they are tightened with a hex screw-- wrench comes with it. The new 16" VS does take pinless and pinned blades - if the salesman says it doesn't then he needs to learn his tools -- send him to me - I'll teach him -- snicker snicker,,,, be sure if you do get a sears to get the replacement warranty with it too -- they are great to get a new saw instead of having to argue about getting one fixed.
        Sharon

        Comment


        • #5
          Vicki,
          Welcome to the group.
          I'm curious about why you want to use the spiral blades - they are a bit less forgiving than "regular" blades.
          Also, I find that they can cut you from every direction, while an ordinary blade is relatively safe if touched on the back or side - only really cutting on the front.
          When I cut with an ordinary blade, I let off the pressure, or even push the wood back just a bit when making turns. With a spiral blade I have to remember not to do that, because the blade will cut whatever it touches. The results can be rather alarming at first - there doesn't seem to be any safe zone for hesitating.
          As to guards, most saws come with a hold-down which will effectively keep fingers away from the blade. Most folks remove them (hold-down - not fingers), but if you leave it in place, it should help guard those fingers a bit.
          Sandy

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Vicki

            Have you considered using a Spiralux saw such as this one? They use an oscillating magnetic field rather than a conventional moving arm principle. It's the same principle as hospitals use for cutting away plaster casts without hurting the patient. Spiralux saws use conventional blades and when you touch them with your finger, they actually stop cutting immediately - it's impossible to hurt yourself on the blade. These saws have been used to good effect by the Headway organisation in the UK, a rehabilitation charity for people with head injuries.

            They aren't terribly powerful saws and struggle with plywood over 1/4" thick. However, they can cut polystyrene ceiling tiles which are thicker. Since they operate though vibration, they naturally tend to vibrate more than conventional saws. Nevertheless, they're cheap, effective and totally safe.

            Unfortunately, these saws only seem to be available on eBay nowadays and I don't know where you'd find one in the US. Perhaps somebody else could advise on this?

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

            Comment


            • #7
              Vicki,

              Could you tell us a little bit more about the organization you are working for and what type of shop and projects you are looking to set up?
              Dan

              -Just do'in the best I can every day

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Vicki, it sounds like your saw is the type that takes blades with pins on the ends. Craftsman does make VS, or variable speed, saws that will take both pinned and pinless blades. Unfortunately most salespeople in stores that sell tools have little knowledge of scrollsaws.

                If you cannot get the adapters that Sharon is talking about, you could either order them online or check out Frank Pozsgai's site. He makes many aftermarket adapters for saws.

                If you want to buy a new saw, so you have more, then you may want to look at the Delta, they are easy to change blades without tools and will take spiral blades.

                I agree with Owler, we are all interested in what kinds of projects you are going to do.
                CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

                Comment

                Unconfigured Ad Widget

                Collapse

                Latest Topics

                Collapse

                Working...
                X