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  • Foot switch, doesn´t function after all...

    Hi again guys!

    I´m back with a new perculiar problem.

    Got myself a foot switch for my Delta 40-570 variable speed scroll saw...or so I thought.

    There were no foot switches ready made available for my scroll saw for the European specs, that is 230 Volt. So, I got the foot switch separately from an electronics shop and had a local electrician set it safely up for me. It just connects between the plug from the machine and the wall receptacle. Works just fine with anything I can plug into it...EXCEPT the scroll saw.

    It´s a momentary switch and workes as such with other appliances. But when connected to the scroll saw, there seem to be some kind of safety built into the electronics of the scroll saw. Now, if I keep my foot on the switch and then hit the ON-button on the scroll saw, it will start. Then I only have to remove my foot for the scroll saw to stop. That´s nice. BUT, when I then push the pedal again, nothing happens unless I keep it pressed down and then push the ON-button on the scroll saw again!

    I think I can hear some kind of relee(don´t know the right word for it in English, maybe relay?)-sound, the typical clicking of it when the saw gets the power connected from the foot switch, but then you have to push the ON-button.

    What to do now? There is no connection diagram in the manual of the scroll saw. Could I find the relee easily and bypass it safely? I didn´t think this would be so difficult and even played it safe with getting a professional to put the foot switch together for me. But now this, works with everything else THAN the scroll saw for which I got it...I´m starting to believe I have a personal little Murphy following my path...

  • #2
    Safety feature

    Well Ken I am not sure how Delta wired the saw for 230volt line.
    I suspect that the relay you hear is a safety feature that will leave the saw in the off position in case of a power outage. If the power was out and the saw was left un attended then it wouldnt kick in with no one around.

    It wouldnt be difficult to bypass that safety feature but I am not sure how that would affect the warrantee.

    The electrician would have no problem bypassing the relay.
    If you contact Delta and tell them your problem they may be able to come up with a solution.
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

    Comment


    • #3
      From your description it sounds as if your scroll saw's switch also operates a relay.When depressed, the switch actuates and seals in a relay to apply power to the motor. The power from the foot switch keeps the relay energized. When you remove your foot from the switch the "seal in" contacts in the relay drop out de-energizing the motor. It cannot start back up until the saw's switch is again depressed while the foot switch is held down to supply power to the relay. I'm not stating this as fact because I don't know the electricals of your particular saw but this is what the symptoms would point to. I do base it on 40 years experience as an electrician...LOL!!!
      Last edited by Neal Moore; 02-08-2006, 04:39 PM.
      If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

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      • #4
        Thanks guys for your very informative replies!

        I´ll first try to get the electrical layout from Delta. Maybe that relay is part of the switch assembly, if so then wouldn´t it be possible to just physically remove it and bypass it with a suitable wiring... It seems pretty easy to remove the housing around the switch, so I could easily take a look "under the hood" even without touching anything of the electrical stuff, just to see what there is. Don´t worry, I wont touch or modify anything myself that I am not absolutely sure of what I´m doing. But it would be easier to talk to the electrician if I had a better idea myself of where that relay is. Just putting together the foot switch, although I provided every single part included the cables, cost me 30 euros for the job the electician said he spent about 15 minutes on. Naturally I paid for his know-how, and I didn´t mind that at all. Safety first. Still, I want any connection to be made so that it looks neat and the dust is kept away from the electric compartment, and would like to have the scroll saw modified in such a way that it can be operated both with and without the foot switch in the future.

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        • #5
          Didn´t get any technical advice nor electrical layouts from Delta. Seems the factory is in China. Only the marketing is happening in Tennessee? Marketing for the European market seems to be handled by Black & Decker. I was asked to contact them for furthur questions, but having got this answer from Delta Machinery before when trying to locate accessories for another Delta machine I have, a belt&disk sander, and not getting any answer at all from Black&Decker in Europe I believe this to be a dead end. Wonder where these machines are drawn up and planned before the actual manufacturing is carried out in China? That would be the place where they would probably know something of the machine itself. Anybody who knows something about this?

          I wish I would speak fluent Chinese! Seriously speaking, I miss the "good old days" when things were made by the same companies, in the same factory, in the same place on earth, as where the people sat trying to sell their products. It seemed so clear and there was always some knowledgeable person able to answere all kinds of questions of their own products. Of course, I understand outsourcing is cheaper and a way of keeping the cost down...
          Last edited by Ken M; 02-11-2006, 04:18 AM. Reason: just another of those typos

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          • #6
            Ken...try this site: www.acetoolrepair.com/DeltaHtml . I have no experience with these folks. I was just surfing the net to try and find you some help and stumbled across it. You can email them after you get to the site. Hope it works out for you. I would however, think long and hard before modifying the electricals on that or any other saw. You might be getting into a real can of worms and the effort won't be worth the end results. Just a little friendly advice.
            Last edited by Neal Moore; 02-11-2006, 11:17 AM.
            If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Ken,

              I translated the bottom part of your post in Chinese:

              我祝願我會講流利漢語! 嚴重講話, 我錯過"好以前" 當事由同樣公司做了, 在同樣工廠, 在原處在地球, 和人民坐了設法賣他們的產品的地方。它似乎很清楚和有總某些博學的人能對answere 他們自己的產品的各種各樣的問題。當然, 我瞭解採購是便宜和保留費用方式下來...
              I wish I would speak fluent Chinese! Seriously speaking, I miss the "good old days" when things were made by the same companies, in the same factory, in the same place on earth, as where the people sat trying to sell their products. It seemed so clear and there was always some knowledgeable person able to answere all kinds of questions of their own products. Of course, I understand outsourcing is cheaper and a way of keeping the cost down...
              Just kidding that I did it. Don't ask me to speak it. Here is a good translation site: http://babelfish.altavista.com/
              Mike M
              SD Mike

              Comment


              • #8
                Oh yes, the pronounciation is the hard part, as Chinese includes tonal changes that can alter the word meaning completely, it gets real interesting. I once tried to follow a real basic free course that was part of a radio program, it was just the very basics of the language. Well, I gave up after hearing one word pronounced in 4 different ways by the same person and not hearing any difference myself! BUT, I know how to pronounce my own name in Japanese, I have a friend from over there who told me how to say it. In English it´s pronounced /ken/, and in Japanese it´s /ken/. So Japanese is very easy as you can see!

                Thanks for the link hints and fair warnings. I´ll have a look and if as usual all my attempts fail, I´ll turn to my friendly electrician once again.

                By the way, today I visited a big boat exhibition in our capital Helsinki. There was a guy selling and demonstrating japanese wood handsaws. I got to try out several types, and folkes, these saws make an incredibly nice cut and outperform any western saw I´ve ever tried! For fine cutting, you just got to try them.

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