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  • Which Scrollsaw to chooze?

    Can't afford a Heigner then which scroll saw to choose on a budget.

    This link might help, it is a review from Woodnet,
    I own a Craftman and just found out that it is the editor's choice.

    http://www.woodnet.net/plansnow/review-scrollsaw.pdf
    Last edited by boogatoo; 02-08-2006, 09:01 PM.

  • #2
    boogatoo, don't know how much you plan to spend. I looked long and hard at the Dewalt 788 and the Delta P-20 and finally decided on the P-20. Both are great saws and sell for just under $500. I chose the P-20 because of the blade clamp system and it is a heavier, more industrial type saw, it also has lubrication ports. Good luck with whichever saw you choose. Mick
    Mick, - Delta P-20

    A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

    Comment


    • #3
      Is a $500 machine in your budget? If so, then I'd reccomend a dewalt, with stand. Second choice for about the same $'s would possibly be a delta p20, although I done like their clamping mechanisms
      Dale w/ yella saws

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with Mick . The Delta P-20 is built like a tank and ready for hard use. I wore out a Dewalt in slightly over three years and then bought a P-20. My personal feeling is that the blade clamps are far superior on the P-20 but one must use them for an hour to get used to the difference. Looking at them or trying them at a show is not a fair test.
        The DeWalt is a good hobby saw and I am not going to talk about all the things I don't like about it because there are a lot of people that have them and love them. I liked mine too when I didn't know the difference between the two makes.
        If you are only looking for a hobby saw, the Dewalt is a good choice. If you are looking for a production saw and one that will be the last one you will ever need, then I would recommend the Delta P-20. I wouldn't trade my P-20 for any saw on the market and it is priced half as much as some of the so called 'top line' saws.
        It also has the easiest top feeding feature on the market bar none.
        I wish you the best of luck with whichever one you choose.
        W.Y.
        http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

        The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

        Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

        Comment


        • #5
          This is an age old question that rears it's head every few months.
          While the advice to purchase the best saw you can afford is sound advice, you also have to consider how much sawing you will be doing, and what type of work you will be doing.

          Herein lies the problem. Many budding scrollers, have no idea what they would like to do until they have experience with each style of cutting.
          If you try and do some delicate fretwork on a saw that vibrates excessively you may well be put off scrolling.

          Both low end and high end saws are subject to vibration. Saw setup, is critical to reducing the vibration. A saw that is engineered and manufactured to higher standards, will indubitably out perform one that is thrown together at a price. However, inexpensive saws that are set up correctly can produce wonderful work.

          There are many reviews out there and you have access to the internet so read up all you can. Once you have narrowed down the price range and the features of the saw you are looking for, go to the store and try and change a blade or two.

          Be sure to angle the table. What is an easy change when the table is flat could be a pain when the table is tilted. If you do not plan on doing any bevel cuts it may not be a problem.
          Visibility and access to the blade are is key too.

          Check the location of the controls, saw speed and on off switches should be clearly visible. If you have to reach to the back of the saw to set blade tension, make sure you don't inadvertently hit a power switch while leaning over the saw.

          Once you have got that far, ask on the forum about the specific model you are looking at, see if anyone owns that model. Manufacturers change models quite often. Some show significant improvement. Just because an older saw made by a manufacturer wasn't too good, doesn't mean the new saws made by the same manufacturer are not better.

          Good luck.
          Last edited by CanadianScroller; 02-09-2006, 02:27 PM.
          CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
          "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
          Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

          Comment


          • #6
            Rain Man;
            I got a real laugh at this.
            Bought The Bigger Delta And I Tried It But It Was The Same As The 16 Inch Only Abigger. Lots Of Vibration In Both.
            You are definitely not referring to a Delta P-20 but then you didn't mention a model number.
            And I had a 16" Delta before my Dewalt.It was a great little starter saw and I produced many thousands of dollars worth of craft items on it. I gave it to a neighbor when I bought the DeWalt and he is still using it. . The Dewalt totally wore out in three years so I went to the industrial quality Delta P-20.It is over three years old now and has done more sawing than most saws do in ten years and it working just as good as the day it came out of the box.
            There are many thousands of scrollers that are using 16" Delta scrollsaws that may take exception to your comments . They have been using them for many years and they are very satisfied with them. It is a well known fact according to reports on many sites over the years that Delta 16" saws are considered the best saw in their price range.
            W.Y.
            http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

            The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

            Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

            Comment


            • #7
              Don't turn down peoples who are seeking for advices on entry-level and mid-level saw.

              Actually, the thread I started was not realy to find out wich saw to purchase, I already own one for 3 years now. The reason I started this thread was more to tell that not every person is going for the big gun. And I am one of them. I rather spend more money on a very good dust controlling system that will keep me alive to scroll longer. I purchased a Craftman for 300$ that is a mid range quality. My point is that many people turn to this forum to get advice and they recive answers from some arrogant people that are not listening to their needs.

              Some people JUST want to know what other saws are good outside from those big-large expensive Heigner, Dewalt etc. Some people would like to be introduced to scrollsawing without having to put a second mortgage ont their house. But the only advice they seem to get on this forum is "**** or get of the pot".

              But there are very good scrollsaw available at affordable prices. They could provide years of service and if eventually that hidden talent call for more, then do an upgrade to a bigger saw.

              The review I submitted is targetting these low and mid end machines to help people that are looking for these ranges of scroll saw...and I am sure that for a lot of scrollsawer, these are enough...at least to find out if they like to scroll saw enough before to go for a higher end model.

              Once again, for those who want to inquire about mid range saw, here is the link to the review I submitted: http://www.woodnet.net/plansnow/review-scrollsaw.pdf
              Last edited by boogatoo; 02-09-2006, 08:11 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Unfortunately, Boogatoo, you seem to be in the wrong country when it comes to getting decent budget scrollsaws. If you were in the UK, I wouldn't hesitate in directing you to the SIP 16" saw which currently sells for less than £60 (roughly $105 US). It's mid-range quality at a bargain basement price. I wish I could compare it to some of the machines in the US budget range, but unfortunately I've no experience of most of the saws that are being discussed (except for Hegners... and let's not go there ).

                Gill
                There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Boogatoo--
                  I read all the responses to your original question and I don't see what you are getting so irritated about (ref your quote). When you ask for people's opinions you are likely to get them. I think the responses you have received have tried to sincerely give the best advice on which saw to buy--based on that person's experience. As CanadianScroller said, this subject comes up every so often in this forum and the results are usually the same. Buy the best saw you can afford for what you want to do. Everyone will tout the saw that they have had the best luck with. However, facts are facts, and generally the lower priced saws are priced that way for a reason--just like any machine. I have a 20" Sears variable speed saw and an RBI Hawk. The Sears saw is OK, but nothing like the Hawk. Of course the Sears saw cost less than a third the price of the Hawk. So I could have three of them for the price of the "better" saw. Should I do that? Did I save money by buying three instead of one? Who knows?
                  Moon
                  Old Mooner

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well said Mooner;
                    Experience with the various saws mean a lot and some of us have had much more hands on experience than others.
                    I agree that if you can't afford a mid range or so called high end one it is best to start with one of the smaller 16" ones than to not be scrolling at all. I worked my way up through three different levels of saws as far as price and quality goes in order to get to where I have one that I know will be my last one. But for some to give off the wall remarks and discredit the lower end ones like we see here and there is just not right. A lot of scrollers are just getting started and are quite happy with their lower priced saws and no doubt will gradually work their way up as they can afford it like many of us did. Then some will loose interest in scrolling altogether not because of their saw but because it is just not the type of hobby they expected it to be .. In that case they havn't lost much because it is hard to get any more than half price for a used saw regardless of its make or model.
                    W.Y.
                    http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                    The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                    Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sorry, I didnt read your question right. I assumed you were asking what saw to buy on a budget. What exactly is a budget? Are you a six figure pencil pusher, or someone that works for a living? Are you a child using allowance, or a retired person that works most of your life then lost your job to overseas cheap labor and got your pension yanked from you? If someone wants a saw on a budget, then wouldnt it make sense to say what type of budget they are on? Read the replies, it seems everyone in some sort asked what budget you were speaking of.
                      Dale w/ yella saws

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There's a scrollsaw comparison chart on the SAW forum. Fretnmore found it in a book and got permission to reprint it. Doesn't say which is best, just gives technical info.
                        Fred


                        There's a fine line between woodworking and insanity, I'm just not sure which side of the line I'm on!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Rain Man;

                          I'm Sure There Is A Site In Here That Shows How To Take Care Of Your Saw, Look It Up ! Rain Man
                          I have the utmost respect for all my power tools and service them on a regular basis. I have the service manual for every one of them. The Dewalt 788 manual clearly states that there is no lubrication required . Metal to metal on moving parts does wear out in time if not lubricated.
                          That is why I chose a saw that has sealed ball bearings where necessary and oil cups where necessary.
                          I have said many times and I will repeat it again in case you might have missed it. The DeWalt is an excellent hobby saw and I am happy for anyone that owns one and enjoys it. But it's life expectancy is limited compared to any make that is designed for industrial use.
                          Mine wore out because I used it for contiuous heavy duty sawing of stacked hardwoods . It happened when I was in the middle of some pre Christmas rush orders that I had to fill and I could not wait for a complete overhaul and replacement of all the moving parts so I drove 420 km each way to get an industrial quality saw.
                          Be happy with your saw and enjoy it.. If you don't push it too hard it could very well out last you.
                          I don't post messages about different saws with the intention to offend anyone. I simply state facts as I have found them to be true from my own experiences . Only after people read the pros's and cons of different ones can they decide on where they want to spend their hard earned money. Unfortunately a few always read me the wrong way and get ruffled feathers when I talk from experience.
                          That is unfortunate and is something I have no control over.
                          Be happy and keep on scrolling .
                          W.Y.
                          http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                          The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                          Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Rain Man ;
                            No apologie necessary and no problem . The written (typed) word can be misinterpreted by any one of us and so often is. . The same comments talked about face to face with a person can be totally different when we see the smiles on each others face and the meaning of our discussions.
                            It takes a man to apologise like you did and if I offended you in any way I also apologise.
                            Take care my friend and go ahead and make lots of sawdust.
                            W.Y.
                            http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                            The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                            Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

                            Comment

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