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  • Drill Press Preference

    I had some issues with my drill press over the weekend and it set me to thinking. A lot of discussion is put into the type of scroll saws people prefer. But what about one of the other frequently used pieces of equipment in most scrollers' workshops?

    What brand of drill press do you use or do you use one at all?

    What features does it have that you particularly like?

    What features does it have that you particularly don't?

    Does it meet the expectations you had for it when you purchased it?

    Just curious about the preferences on something different. By the way, mine was a GMC from Lowe's. A cheapo that I thought would do fine for drilling a few holes. But apparently not what it was cracked up to be. And that laser guiding hogwash is just that. I never used it. Never saw the need for it.

  • #2
    I have 2 and they are both Deltas. One is a table top 12" and the other is a floor model 16" Depends on what you are using it for. If it is just scrolling and light woodworking the table top is great. I highly recommend the Delta. Get at the big box stores. The thing I would really like and they just came out with it is a speed controller wheel up front. Makes changing speeds easy not that moving a belt on a pulley is that hard. But it is a gadget that is new and if I were buying either a table top or a floor model it would have this feature. The big key when getting a new drill press is to make sure the quill runs straight and true. The thing I hate to hear people do with a drill press is use it as a drum sander. Drill presses are made to put pressure downward not sideways. This is my opinion.
    John T.

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    • #3
      Drill presses

      Well I have to bug JT again. I have 2 drill presses one for drilling, one for sanding. I know they use thrust bearings, and they are not the best for sanding but at 38 bucks I can throw them away when they burn out.
      They are both made by Mastercraft who gets them made by Delta. 8 Inch models.
      I am still using the same ones for 8 years now.
      Sorry JT, I know its not right but I can't help myself. I don't do a lot of sanding anyway. My blades are so sharp I don't need to

      I do have an antique thickness sander which I am having trouble getting paper for
      It is hard to by 8" x 25" sheets. I know I can get 150 foot rools, but thats a lot of sanding
      CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
      "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
      Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

      Comment


      • #4
        Drill presses

        I have a Craftsman benchtop next to my saw and a Harbor Freight floor model. One thing I did that improved the HF a whole bunch was to replace the belts with link belts. It runs real smooth now. That would probably help any drill press out there.

        Comment


        • #5
          I like my Sears Floor model drill press.

          Not because it was so-o great when I bought it, or anything like that.

          When I bought it, (about 2 to 3 decades ago), my dad had just retired as a senior Master-Craftsman (Union designation) in the Automotive Tool and Die trade (ran a machine called a 'keller.') He looked over my Drill press and gave the Tisk-tisk and usuall grunts that any craftsman gives before announcing 'Yes, I can fix it, but it will take some time and a little bit of money.'

          Anyway, I was living just outside of Baltimore MD at the time, and three days of his eating his fill of Balitimore Crabs (Blue Fin Crabs??) (Steamed, Crab cakes, and crab Imperial; all with lots Old Bay) my sears drill press was declared fit to use. And yes, the 'fixing' took just as long as it took him to get his fill of crabs.

          I won't bore you with the details, but the drill press has been moved several times, and it still works great. I just cannot afford another crab feast now that I am living near Detroit, and fresh Crab meat is a little expensive shipped all the way from the East Coast. So I will stick with my Sears Drill press.

          Phil

          Comment


          • #6
            I've got a Dremel in a drillstand. Works fine.

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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            • #7
              Carl will love to hear this and at least one other probably won't, I have a dirty little secret in my woodshop...a Ryobi drill press.

              For the light duty work I need to accomplish and the price, I could not avoid the urge go with Ryobi versus other models. I am pleased thus far and have had no problems yet. My only limitation is dealing with larger peices of material as I cannot get those inside holes drilled...but that is when a cordless drill picks up the slack.
              Todd

              Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

              Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

              Comment


              • #8
                First let me address Carl. I am not bugged because I don't follow what your point was. I said I have 2 Deltas and would recommend them to anyone. I never said there are not other good drill presses out there for what actually is a drill press just a drill motor mounted in a stand. I stand by the Delta recomendation and if you talk to any true woodworker not hobbiest they will agree Delta is a very good brand. You mention you have 2 one for drilling and one for sanding and they still run. It sounds like you are more surprised than I, they still run. I stated it is not a good idea to use a drill press as a drum sander because of the sideward preassure being exerted on the quill not the bearings unless and this is a big unless they have a device where you can anchor the bottom have of a drum sander. If you took a true machinist rod and chucked it into the drill press that you use as a sander I bet your last dollar that the runout is more than the one used for drilling only. Runout is important if you have to accurately drill something not putting holes in wood to thread blades.Any drill can do that. It was mentioned a Dremel is used. So what is your point?? You said you pay $38 dollars for it then this is good for you but the question was what drill press is used by others I voiced my ownership. So Carl it is not a case of disagreeing with me my friend.
                John T.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have a Horbour Fright bench top and it gets the job done. I only use it for inside cuts and only wood. But, it works fine.

                  -Bill
                  -Bill

                  My saw is a DeWalt788 Measure twice; cut once; count fingers after cut

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Drill press

                    I used to build a lot of doll furniture ( miniatures) so most of my power tools are small. I have a proxxon drill press with a milling bed installed. It works well for drilling pilot holes in small fret work. I also use a miniature table saw by proxxon and a miniature router table by the same manufacturer for shaping small moulding strips. All three machines do very precision work.
                    If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      C'mon Neal, we all know the truth, you bought minature tools because the big ones weren't allowed on those Navy ships.
                      Todd

                      Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

                      Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I used to have a bench drill press and finally gave it to a friend. Bench drill presses are usualy lower quality when thir size is 8" to 12" from the chuck to the rear arbor. They usualy have low quality bearings and their shaft will wander eventualy. Also, they usualy have only two spindles to control speed. This is OK for high speed but will burn the bits that are designed for low speed like Forstner bit.

                        There are some bench drill presses that are better but you must go to 14" and higher models. They usualy have 3 spindles to controll speed to as low as 260 RPM but these are cumbersome on a bench. So if you are ready to get one of them top up a few extra dollars and get a floor model.

                        I now have a General International floor model with a buil-in light standard light socket. see it at http://www.general.ca/pagemach/machines/75150a.html. This is a realy great feature! It has 3 spindle pulley and is heavy enough to use it a spindle sander. It is built of cast Iron and the pulley cover is made of metal. This drill press is vibration free.

                        I purchased it for 260$ CAN. (about 180$ U.S.). Delta have a very similar model but a bit more expensive and the spindle cover is made of plastic and does not have the third spindle speed reducer in it. To have the 3rd spindle it is much more expensive. I would never go back to a bench model anymore.

                        As JTtheClockMan said, It is not a good idea to use the drill press as a Sanding Drum, because it put sideway stress to the bearings. But there is a solution to that. Get the ShopNotes magasine issue 81 http://www.shopnotes.com/main/sn81-toc.html and build it yourself. This model has a bearing in which the end of the drum axel gets in so it does not force the drill press bearing sideways. The plan is included and very easy to build.
                        Last edited by boogatoo; 08-05-2005, 06:02 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CanadianScroller
                          Well I have to bug JT again. I have 2 drill presses one for drilling, one for sanding. I know they use thrust bearings, and they are not the best for sanding but at 38 bucks I can throw them away when they burn out.
                          They are both made by Mastercraft who gets them made by Delta. 8 Inch models.
                          I am still using the same ones for 8 years now.
                          Sorry JT, I know its not right but I can't help myself. I don't do a lot of sanding anyway. My blades are so sharp I don't need to

                          I do have an antique thickness sander which I am having trouble getting paper for
                          It is hard to by 8" x 25" sheets. I know I can get 150 foot rools, but thats a lot of sanding
                          Howdy, CS,

                          Have you tried here http://www.woodpeck.com/sandflee.html for the sandpaper they use for the SandFlee? http://www.woodpeck.com/cgi-woodpeck...5&function=add

                          If your sander is based on this concept, you may like to consider this type of product, instead of the sheet goods.

                          http://www.woodpeck.com/media/caption_sandfleeA.jpg

                          Bob
                          Last edited by robertlmaukjr; 08-14-2005, 07:59 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GrayBeard Phil
                            I like my Sears Floor model drill press.

                            Not because it was so-o great when I bought it, or anything like that.

                            When I bought it, (about 2 to 3 decades ago), my dad had just retired as a senior Master-Craftsman (Union designation) in the Automotive Tool and Die trade (ran a machine called a 'keller.') He looked over my Drill press and gave the Tisk-tisk and usuall grunts that any craftsman gives before announcing 'Yes, I can fix it, but it will take some time and a little bit of money.'

                            Anyway, I was living just outside of Baltimore MD at the time, and three days of his eating his fill of Balitimore Crabs (Blue Fin Crabs??) (Steamed, Crab cakes, and crab Imperial; all with lots Old Bay) my sears drill press was declared fit to use. And yes, the 'fixing' took just as long as it took him to get his fill of crabs.

                            I won't bore you with the details, but the drill press has been moved several times, and it still works great. I just cannot afford another crab feast now that I am living near Detroit, and fresh Crab meat is a little expensive shipped all the way from the East Coast. So I will stick with my Sears Drill press.

                            Phil
                            THE MARYLAND BLUE CRAB


                            From the shores of the Chesapeake Bay

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ot!

                              Now you've done it--

                              It's August, it's hot, the table Corn is ripe and ready for eating and you bring up the Chesapeake Bay crab. Why not taunt us with some cold beer while you're at it.

                              (For those who have never had the chance, fresh corn on the cob, steamed Chesapeake Bay crabs (with Old Bay seasoning), cold beer and a Hot, Hazy, Humid Weekend picnic on the Chesapeake Bay is unique. akin to the unique enjoyment of Cajun Gumbo in New Orleans, thick pizza in Chicago, and barbequed beef ribs in Texas.)

                              Anyway Welcome RoberLMulkJr to the forum.

                              Phil

                              Comment

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