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  • Need help...:<

    Hey out there I am new to this forum. I have been looking for help everywhere. I have a Ryobi 16" var. speed. I was working on it the other day and the lower clamp broke and one of the sides on the lower arm which hold the clamp. I contacted the company and they seemed to just run me around. And I contacted a auth. service center. and the couldn't help with no part numbers. If anyone could help me out it would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanx
    Adam

  • #2
    Hi Adam

    Welcome to the forum .

    If you know the product number of the saw, this link might be able to get you the manual which could have an exploded diagram and parts numbers. Alternatively, the Ryobi customer service department might be able to help you out.

    Gill
    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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    • #3
      I don't know how to say this without seeming crude, rude, and a total butt head; but, now that it's broke, leave it that way and spend the money you were going to spend to fix the Ryobi on another say (new or used). As to which make and model, there are many, look around (this board is a good place to start) and you will find something. Your scrolling and enjoyment will improve greatly.

      Comment


      • #4
        Is the Ryobi that poor of a design that it isn't worth the money to repair it??

        Comment


        • #5
          Akaschneider:

          1st: Welcome to the forum. I just wish we could have meet before you invested in your Ryobi saw.

          But to answer your question as best as I can, you will need to get the parts diagram, and parts list for your specific model. See Gill's reply post. These tools will help you find the part number for your specific scroll saw. I have no first hand knowledge of Ryobi, but I suspect you will find it hard to get parts. And even harder to get instructions on how to remove and replace the necessary parts. I wish you luck.

          I also don't know how to explain this gently, but you do get what you pay for.

          Few who frequent this forum have a Ryobi saw. It is just too cheeply made. The difference between your saw and the next level up is quite dramatic in terms of design and useability. Of course, the next level up cost more money. There are two more steps beyond that before you get to the $1000.00 top of the line machines.

          At this forum, and other scroll saw forums, we keep seeing posts about an "entry level" saw. No such machine. There are just inexpensive machines that have traded off quality design for cost savings which leads to frustration and anger of the new user.

          Phil

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          • #6
            My experience with Ryobi (I have their bt-3000 table saw) is: find a good service center and hope they are not too busy to help you. Ryobi corporation is too busy making industrial castings for Kathmandu to help you with your saw in wherever-it-is-you-are.

            Really, an authorized Service Center that has to rely on YOU to provide the part number is a Disservice center. See if there's another service center reachable from your location. I don't have any experience with the Ryobi scroll saw; my experience with their table saw and detail sander are quite enough, thank you. I won't buy any more Ryobi. They seemed to come into the market ten (?) ... fifteen (?) years ago with all kinds of promise and then to disappear leaving a lot of backstok of tools behind. Their tools are not that bad until you need service for them.

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            • #7
              Adam,
              I don't have any experience with Ryobi's scroll saw, but I have owned their mini-lathe and the reciprocating carver. It seems to be a pattern with them to offer the most features for considerably less money than anyone else (and THAT should have been our first warning) and then just offer poor or no service when you need it, or, even worse, when you determine your part and number, they have discontinued the manufacture and support of that product.
              So.o.o.o.... those of us who are financially challenged had just better learn to wait a few more months (or years) and save up for a better supported tool. Read around this forum, and you will find several that are recommended. Then spend your hard earned $$$ on one of those, and have all the fun you were looking forward to.
              Good luck, and let us know how you come out on this.
              Sandy

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              • #8
                Hey you all,
                I finally just decided to go off and buy a different scroll saw. Again it isn't a top of the line model it is a GMC. It seems to be lacking in certin area's but I am removing them from my ryobi and combining them into one. Thanx for the advice from everyone. My next Q is anyone know where I can get some good plans? Again thanx for the help.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Adam

                  There are plans all over the place - even in 'Scroll Saw Workshop'!



                  You could try this source if you don't want to shell out cash. There are plenty of plans in various pattern books - just run a quick search through an online book retailer such as Amazon. Alternatively there are sites such as this, this, and this. I'm sure other members will be able to point you towards more sources, too.

                  What sort of projects are you thinking of undertaking? Knowing this will help us to guide you towards the most appropriate patterns.

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Adam,
                    Try your local library to see the variety of patterns available. Also any issues of Scroll Saw Workshop, and (dare I say it) the "other" mag - Creative Woodworking and Crafts. You will quickly see the many directions you may want to pursue.
                    And good luck on your saw project. Its the pits when your equipment is holding you back, although I have to admit that at first, lack of experience can produce the same effects.
                    Anyhow, good luck in combining those saws - with the way most of the cheapies are made in China, you could have 2 near identical saws with different brands.
                    Sandy
                    Last edited by sheltiecarver; 06-01-2005, 07:58 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      They appear to be very similar in design but a few differences in the over all design are apparent. For a while I scroll sawed off and on. But I have a vast knowledge of a variety of wood working machinery. I am a now a supervisor for a major furniture manufacturer. So coming accross wood is no problem just finding that just right projects. Thank you for all your encouragement. I'll post my first decent project out come.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        patterns patterns everywhere

                        I find tons of patterns to use online. It is easy to search using Google and setting the advanced search features to black and white.
                        If you are looking for a particular subject like a wolf, type in wolf first. If the results are not satisfactory or there are too many try typing in "Wolf clipart"
                        You can also try wolves, wild animals...the variations are endless.
                        I also use Altavista image search.
                        Many times if the clip art is too small you may have to enlarge it with a paint program and clean it up.
                        Be warned though, it can be addictive I have far too many patterns now and I just cant stop collecting. Maybe when I start to need storage in the terabytes I should call it quits
                        CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                        "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                        Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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