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  • #16
    Band Saw

    Hi Gill

    What you are suggesting would make a good application for a band saw. Others have suggested the use of a "riser block" but its not necessary. I purchased the Jet 14" Bandsaw and it works great for resawing the thickness of your wood down to the size you'd be interested in.

    It is advisable to build a small wooden fence to help in the resawing, something that maybe is 5-6 inches high and can be clamped to the bandsaw table. This fence would need to have a verticle piece attached to allow you to guide the wood through the blade. Since bandsaws like scroll saws tend to drift a little, you'd need to make say a 1/4 inch line along the edge of yopur wood and follow this line as it goes through the blade.

    Blades for resawing are also quite wide. I think mine might be 5/8th inch wide and I can easly cut a 1x6 or 1x8 piece of wood to what ever the desirable thickness might be. The bandsaw will leave kerf marks where it cut through the wood, but a power saander will eliminate the marks.

    To protect your fingers, resaw and sand a full sized piece of wood than cut that wood to the smaller size piece for your project. The Drum Sander would benice but at about $800-900 US, it is way out of my ability to afford one.

    Hope this helps.

    Jim
    Jim Paskett
    RBI HAWK 220

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    • #17
      Gill

      The size you are talking about is no problem and the use of a carrier board or sled as you call it would be needed for small lengths but keep in the back of your mind even with a sled you will get snipe at the ends of the boards or pieces. The ones with the locking heads help alot but you still will get some. It is the nature of the beast. A drum sander sounds like alot of money but if you buy thinner woods then it will pay for itself quickly. This of course is just my opinion. I thin alot of wood and mine has payed for itself many times over. Good luck and hope it does what you are looking to do.
      John T.

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      • #18
        Hi Gill,

        If you decide to buy used, avoid the Craftsman saws with the tilting head (12"). I have one of these. The tilting gears and mechanism are made of plastic and after awhile, they do not work very well. I am not knocking Sears Craftsman in general, or Emerson Electric, which made these saws for Sears (and whom makes the Ridgid brand carried by Home Depot) but I strongly recommend that you avoid the Craftsman tilting-head saws.

        -Alan
        Excalibur EX-II, Delta 40-560

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        • #19
          Great thread. Thanks, everyone! I, too, will own a bandsaw ... someday ... to use primarily for resawing (I already have a planer). But I bet when I do get one, I'll use it for a lot more than that. The Rikon models have caught my eye (the local Woodcraft sells them). Probably the 14" (1.5 HP), which has a resaw capacity of 13" (no need for a riser block) or the next higher model, 18" (2HP), resaw 12". Any opinions on the Rikons? Not that I'm gonna run right out and buy one.

          Also - these are very heavy tools. Most places warn that the delivery truck driver won't (can't) help me get it off the truck. Even if it comes in pieces, I'm still concerned about getting the individual pieces off (if that's even possible) without dropping them. So how typically does a bandsaw get from the store into the garage?

          Again - great thread.
          Kevin

          Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. -- Dr. Seuss

          NEW DeWalt 788 and that old, Jimmy- Jerry- and Kevin-rigged Delta 40-560

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          • #20
            Rigid has a 14" band saw with great reviews. It is considered one of the best in its price range. The great thing about Rigid is that it is the primary Home Depot brand.

            Band saw blades do tend to have "drift" The drift tends to be consistent and most band saw rip fences include micro ajustments to account for the drift.
            ---Support bacteria - they're the only culture some people have.

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            • #21
              Kevin:

              My knowledge comes from purchase of my Delta 14" back in 1986 and moving it 3 times to new homes. (I kept the wood pallet, more on that later.)

              My bandsaw came in three sub-assemblies: Motor, lower box, and upper wheel assembly.

              I found the Motor to be the heaviest, but manageable. Like a luggable large TV set.

              The upper assembly (wheel) was bolted to a wooden palette and was difficult to handle since there was a sign about not lifting using the sheet metal covers over the upper wheel. Lifting should only be done using the cast iron frame or the wood pallet. I can lift it my self, but the awkward lift restrictions makes it a two person lift only so I don't fall over due to weight distribution. Call it an adult male and adolescent (Tween?) child helper at minimum.

              The lower box, the motor housing, was dirt easy to lift. No problem, about like a standard extension ladder in weight.

              Your Mileage May Vary.

              Phil

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              • #22
                Thanks Phil. You've convinced me it's manageable. I could always get an adult male friend to help me and bribe him by giving him some time with the saw.

                And thanks for the mention of the Rigid saw, NM. I'll check it out, as well as the Jet. My planer is a Rigid and I'm quite happy with it.
                Kevin

                Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. -- Dr. Seuss

                NEW DeWalt 788 and that old, Jimmy- Jerry- and Kevin-rigged Delta 40-560

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