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  • Thinking of a band saw

    I'm thinking about buying a band saw. Thinking that I could do straight cuts and other good stuff. What do you think? Would a different saw be better and more versatile?

    Thanks.
    -Bill

    My saw is a DeWalt788 Measure twice; cut once; count fingers after cut

  • #2
    Band saws are fantastically useful - it's the most used tool in my workshop after the scroll saw. I don't rely on it for cutting perfectly straight lines because band saw blades have a tendency to wander. Like scroll saws, the blades have a bias. However, you can still get good results. I'd have thought a table saw would be better if really accurate straght cuts are what you're after.

    The other day I halved a 5 inch mahogany board on my band saw. It's this flexibility of use that makes me love my band saw, plus the fact that there's no danger of 'kick-back'. I own a Kity band saw but I'm not sure if that's available where you are.

    Gill
    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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    • #3
      I have a Delta 14" with a riser block, so I can re-saw up to 12" wide boards. It has worked fine for many years. However I also would check out the Jet. It seems that a lot of people are very happy with the Jet. Again make sure you get the riser block. I have done a lot of re-sawing and when you buy the right blade you will not have any wandering. I use the Timberwolf blades, nice thin blades: http://www.timberwolf1.com/ If you call, tell them what you use it for. For re-sawing you need a different blade than for everage sawing.
      When re-sawing it would be nice to have a planer also. You can make your own thickness for any project you like to make.

      Mike M
      SD Mike

      Comment


      • #4
        Jet bandsaw

        I've had the 14" Jet for several years now, I use it when I do intarsia to resaw the pieces to the proper thickness along with using it for general woodworking. I want to add the riser block as soon as I use up my supply of blades. I've added the Carter ball bearing guides and the Carter quick release to take the tension off the blade when I'm not using the saw. I've had no problems with it and if I were in the market for a new saw would buy the Jet again.

        Comment


        • #5
          Best advice I can give you on a bandsaw is buy the biggest baddest one you can afford. Absolutely do not buy one of the table top 9" models. Get one that will accept a riser block. Finally, and probably most important, use only premium blades. 3-M mentioned "Timberwolf," which is an excellet cloice as are the Olson premium blades (all pro I think is the name, threw away the package). I struggle with standard blades for a long time before switching to the Timberwolfs and premium all pro's and they make all the difference in the world. No wandering and they last a lot longer also, so really are probably cheaper in the end. I think your seeing a trend develop: Big, riser block, and premium blades.

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          • #6
            thanks for the advice

            Thanks for all the advice. After reading your comments last night I looked up Jet, found one in my price range (14” and will except a riser block), and ordered it. Should be here in 2 weeks time.

            Mike-about resaw. Does that mean to cut a board down the middle, that is, to make a 2” thick bard into a 1” thick board? Also, what is a riser block and what does it do.

            Gill-thanks for the comments they really helped. I lived in Flackwell Heath near High Wycombe for a time in my youth.

            Daveww1-thanks for the recommendation on the Jet looks like a very good and reliable saw. I know I will like it.

            Plane Ol Ed-thanks for the blade advice.
            -Bill

            My saw is a DeWalt788 Measure twice; cut once; count fingers after cut

            Comment


            • #7
              Resawing is taking wood of any thickness and cutting it down. I plan on resawing some 3/4" thick wood into three 3/16" (or as close as possible) thick pieces.


              Bob
              www.GrobetUSA.com

              Comment


              • #8
                WWalker47:

                If you are new to band saw:

                You might want to see if you can optain a copy of:
                Band Saw Handbook by Mark Duginske published by Sterling Publishing Co.

                You can find out about the advantages of "cool blocks", one method of re-sawing (there is whole long discussions on that subject of how to re-saw elsewere,) and other tips. Others, who own a Jet can let you know about the "co-linear" alignment thing in Mark's book. Many Delta 14" BS owner's swear by the co-linear alignment.

                Do read chapter 3, blade basics, on the subject of minimun curve cutting by blade width. This is not a major subject with scroll sawing, but in band sawing it becomes important. Also look for a discussion on the "Three-Teeth" rule.

                Also, heed the warning about NEVER back a band saw blade out of a cut while the saw is runing. A real honest-to-goodness safety rule. We do this a lot with scroll sawing, but don't do it on a bandsaw that is running.

                You can rest assured that every year, sometimes everyseason, a NEW IMPROVED must have gizzmo accessory to your new bandsaw will come on the market to keep any extra cash you have at a minimum.

                Phil

                PS: I like the re-saw blades from Highland Hardware (do a google search)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Band saws

                  Anyone new to bandsawing would do well to heed Phil's advice. I found a long time ago that learning from experience sometimes involves pain and suffering!! I also learned through experience that wood ain't all that band saw will cut!!!
                  If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wwalker47
                    I lived in Flackwell Heath near High Wycombe for a time in my youth.
                    What a coincidence. I was stationed at High Wycombe when I was in the RAF. It's not only a nice part of the world, but it was once the heart of woodworking in the UK due to the extensive beech woods there.

                    Incidentally, any UK members who are considering new bandsaw blades ought to check out DureEdge once they've chucked away the blade that manufacturers provide with new machines:

                    DureEdge
                    21 Station Road
                    Woodley
                    Stockport
                    SK6 1HN
                    Tel : 08702-252337
                    Fax : 0161-430-8008

                    No website, I'm afraid - they say they can barely keep up with business as it is, without having to tend a website too! Those of you with a yen for scotch might be interested to learn that DureEdge blades are used extensively by coopers in the whisky industry.

                    Gill
                    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks, Phil

                      Thanks, Phil, I will heed your advice on safty.

                      Gill--That is where my Dad was stationed while we were there. 1963-1965 (man, that was a long time ago) We really liked bening there. I went to school in Watford. My wife and I go back to England quite often.
                      -Bill

                      My saw is a DeWalt788 Measure twice; cut once; count fingers after cut

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Congratulation on the new Jet band saw. You made a very good choice. The riser black makes the upper part higher so you can cut wider boards. Without the riser you can maybe only cut about a 6" board. The advice of the book is very good. Also about moving the wood back when the saw is running. I know that it is bad, tried it once and never again. Re-sawing is like Bob said. You take a 3/4" board and with a thin Timberwolf blade you can even get 3 pieces of 3/16" out of the board. Great for Christmas ornaments. However it is best to have a planer, it is almost impossible to sand it smooth. Chech Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/su...740549-0585612 They have most of the time very good prices and also free shipping on some tools.
                        Mike M
                        SD Mike

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm interested in making a sled to help plane wood I've resawn on the bandsaw. This link was pointed out to me as depicting the sort of sled that could easily be adapted for small pieces of timber. I'll be making one in the very near future .

                          Gill
                          There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                          (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Gill

                            My question to you is how thin are you talking about because if you are talking 1/16" and even 1/8 the planer blades will eat that up and spit it out at the other end. If you are going to do this make sure you use double sided tape on the piece you are going to plane. This is the reason I had bought a Performax drum sander It is the 16/32 and I thin wood to 1/16 with no fear of tearout even if it is a wild grained piece. With wood such as birdseye maple or curly woods and even oaks it will cup on you and get caught. So be careful is the only thing I am saying here. Good luck!!
                            John T.

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                            • #15
                              Hi John

                              I'd love a Performax drum sander but they're not available on this side of the pond. Admittedly, other makes are available (including Jet) but I don't have room for one in my workshop and they're rather on the pricey side for someone who's just a hobbyist. I'm starting to drool now as I check out the prices of drum sanders - one of the big difficulties I have is finding thin timber and one of those little babies would address the issue nicely.

                              I'm not looking at taking the timber down too thin - 1/4 inch or thereabouts would be fine. The need for the sled is not just attributable to the thickness of the offcuts I work with, but also the length. Often I'm trying to thickness pieces that are only a few inches long so I fear it would be impractical to put them into the machine without risking them getting caught up on the cutters.

                              Gill

                              PS Sorry for taking this thread off-topic
                              There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                              (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                              Comment

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