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  • Glue woes

    I guess I used too much 3M77 on the print and wood. It goes on unevenly, so it's hard to be sure the surface is covered everywhere. I didn't want the print to lift at the edge of the pieces.
    The glue caused one brown area of the print to become much lighter. I thought 3M77 would dry faster than wood glue and therefore be less likely to soak through the paper. It's rather thin Kodak glossy paper (48lb, 6.5 mil).
    I removed the print from the wood and reprinted it. Not sure how I'll remove the 3M77 from the wood, or maybe it's wasted. Going to wait a bit for the print to dry/cure or whatever, then spray the Krylon acylic on it.

  • #2
    Use mineral spirits and spray liberally or wipe it on with a rag. Let it sit for a few minutes it should wipe the residue right away. You may have to use a little scrubbing motion but it will clean it off. Let it sit for another couple of hours ( try to let it go for 24 hours) or so to make sure the mineral spirits have evaporated prior to trying to glue again.
    "Still Montana Mike"

    "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
    Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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    • #3
      Sounds like you may have used too much. I spray a coat of the 3M 77 on the back of the pattern and place the pattern on the wood and never had that problem.
      Bob making sawdust in SW Louisiana
      with a EX-21

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      • #4
        Yea, probably used too much so it stayed too wet for too long. I was in a hurry too which did not help. Not sure if I have mineral spirits. Rubbing alcohol did not do much if anything at all. The 3M77 is hard now and I sanded it smooth. I dislike how the 3M77 is instantly sticky - can't smooth/spread it around at all.
        I think Carter uses wood glue. If I go that route, I'll put the glue on the wood and let it sit for a few minutes before placing the print on it. I'll probably give the 3M77 one more try.
        I modified Steve Good's heart pattern and superimposed it temporarily on the image to make sure the kids' heads were in the hearts. I also made the pieces not meet at 4 corners.

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        • #5
          I think Carter uses Aileens Tacky Glue. It doesn't take much I've found out. The first one I did, I had a lot of squeeze out.

          I don't know the size your are doing but with Aileen's I put three lines across a 6"x6" square and that seems to be just about right. I used a drywall blade to spread it out. Someone (Carter?) suggests a plastic scraper. I didn't wait for it to dry at all. Immediately set the picture and started smoothing it out. Keep an eye on of for a a bit 10-20 min in case any bubbles start for form or if it starts to raise up.
          Sawdust King

          If there is one thing I can make perfect every time it is sawdust.

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          • #6
            Yeah, that's what I use. I spread it thin and even on the wood only with a 6" plastic scraper. (Be sure to wash the scraper right away).

            I then, using three fingers, slowly press the picture on from one corner to its opposite and run my finger firmly over the edges. Using this method, I glued down five full-size puzzles and 12 cards yesterday. Then a watched them every few minutes for almost a half-hour as I did other things. I only had a few bubbles to push out and a couple of corners to re-glue. Ready to start cutting tomorrow or so.

            Carter

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            • #7
              you could use rubber cement thinner,it is the best one that I used.
              Most art and craft stores carry it,AC Moore,or Michels.

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              • #8
                Amazed at the flawless cut of all the hearts ,now thats good control.
                M.V.B.
                Carl
                "Home Of The Dust Free Scroll Saw"
                Remember (IT is WHAT it IS)( Unless YOU change IT!)

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                • #9
                  Love the puzzle, Block, and I'm sure the kids will too!
                  Shawn Ferguson

                  Come visit at The Ferguson Puzzle Company !

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                  • #10
                    It's exactly 7x7".
                    Haha, I haven't cut it yet! It won't look so pretty after I cut it, I'm still very new at this and am not very good at cutting. That's the pattern superimposed on top in Photoshop so I'd know where to place the hearts so they did not intersect their heads.
                    I dislike that I couldn't get their faces centered w/o the little hearts getting to close to the top of the big/outter heart, and the other issue was the large heart getting too close to the top of the image. I want the large heart to go inside the "frame". I was going to throw the outter part away at first but saw a puzzle on here where they kept the outter "frame" and liked it. Might cut the "frame" in a few pieces though so it'll fit into a box.
                    I should have cropped less out of the image so I could make the pattern and hearts larger. Couldn't simply make the pattern larger because it's already close to the edge of the image, and can't simply print the file larger because of course that makes their faces larger.
                    BTW, Hobby Lobby sells nice $2-3 heart shaped cardboard boxes - perfect size for puzzles (they come in 2 (or 3?) sizes, and also had star shape and square).

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                    • #11
                      Just FYI - had trouble finding Krylon Triple Glaze at craft stores, but found it at Walmart of all places when buying glue. also founf the "general" 3M spray (might also be in the 3M77 family). Aanyhow, this is the type that says it is photo-safe. The can claims it absorbs less and has a 30 minute working time (going on memory here...). Triple glaze was $3.xx and $5.xx for the 3M77 - dirt cheap! They also carry the normal 3M77 in a HUGE spray can. The were in the same area as epoxy, gorilla glue; etc, not in the spray can paint area.
                      I did not see the glue that Carter uses, so I figured I'd try the photo safe 3M77 next time.

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