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  • Puzzle Making Software

    Does anyone know of a good puzzle making software?

    I am looking for a program that is free, or cheap, and can provide me with different puzzle piece configurations?

  • #2
    Toni
    Did you ever find the Puzzle Software. I am also interested in some.
    MinotBob
    Makita MSJ-401
    Universal Tools:
    Remember you only really need 2 tools: WD-40 and Duct Tape. If it doesn't move and should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the Duct Tape

    Comment


    • #3
      After posting I went looking for SW. I found Puzzle Mania at http://www.freedownloadscenter.com/G...zle_Mania.html

      It allows you to import your own photos and when printed out retains the puzzle piece outline as below. It is $20 shareware but I was able to create a puzzle from one of my pictures with the free tryout version
      Attached Files
      Last edited by MinotBob; 03-28-2006, 08:30 AM.
      MinotBob
      Makita MSJ-401
      Universal Tools:
      Remember you only really need 2 tools: WD-40 and Duct Tape. If it doesn't move and should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the Duct Tape

      Comment


      • #4
        Toni,

        I've sent you an email.

        regards,
        Marcel
        http://marleb.com
        DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

        NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey, folks....Can I put my two cents in? Please, please...try cutting puzzle pieces without a pattern.
          You don't need one! Just start at one corner and cut, being sure to insert locking tabs where there is an edge that couples two pieces.
          Set that piece aside when you're finished and do another one. I beg of you: don't get locked into the psychological constraint of using a pattern.
          Cut one piece at a time and give yourself permission to cut different shapes and sizes.

          And don't let four pieces come together at the same corner, as is the case in the pictured pattern.
          The result is much looser than it needs to be.

          At least try it.....

          Carter
          Last edited by BobD; 03-23-2006, 10:01 AM. Reason: Made it so it would fit in a normal sized screen...

          Comment


          • #6
            As soon as I saw this thread, Carter my friend, I knew what you were going to say <Grin>

            Bob
            www.GrobetUSA.com

            Comment


            • #7
              If the type of puzzle you are trying to make is a picture puzzle that is glued onto a hardboard or baltic birch ply- the best puzzles are free cut , it takes some practice- but they are the most fun to cut- go to mikes workshop he has a puzzleblade thats perfect for this type of cutting. Each puzzlemaker has there own style and form of cutting that makes them unique in their field- some cut random shapes and images ( all freehand ) that are their signature, ex. birds, hearts, dogs, cats etc. One of the best books you can get on this style is a book by Evan J. Kern, titled " Making wooden Jigsaw puzzles " - The best in scrolling to you my friend ! Tony Burns

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              • #8
                Carter --The first time we met here I was in awe of you --You haven't disapointed me yet- everytime I get a card or see a pretty picture I think of you and wishing I could do that. I know you posted the way to do it before but would you PLEASE post how to cut puzzles again for us morons? I will save it to file and actually try it if you will

                Sharon

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sharon, I don't remember when I posted any detail of how I cut puzzles, but here's a brief summary, with a photo to explain.

                  I select pictures primarily from calendars and have also used photos. Any paper as thick or thicker than a magazine cover will do. I glue them onto 1/4" poplar or other wood with Aileen's Tacky Glue or any yellow glue, spread thin and even, smoothing the puzzle slowly from one corner to its opposite.

                  I then cut the outer edges, straight if the picture has a border or wiggly if it doesn't. Then comes one thick coat of any Triple-Thick Glaze spray, after which I let it dry two days.

                  Then I just start cutting, one piece at a time. I begin usually with the upper right corner. If it's a square picture with a border, as below, I cut a corner piece, with two locks, one on each edge side. I then continue, cutting edge pieces with locks to other edge pieces and to the interior. For interior pieces, I cut around the images within the puzzle, or cut somewhat square or triangular pieces, always with at least two locks to adjacent pieces. (Not every piece has to lock with every adjoining piece everytime).

                  When I have completed 30 pieces of so, I stop, give each a light sanding on its bottom, and put them together. When all finished, I have a completed puzzle. I sand the back while it's together and then take it apart, count the pieces and put them in a baggie along with a ~3" picture taken before I started. Then I take it upstairs for my wife.

                  Here's are some pieces of a typical puzzle, this one with a border.

                  Hope this is helpful....Have phun.....Carter

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks Carter- your first puzzel here is where you told me- I rember it was a Garden sceine --or something like that -Your explaination is going to be kept on my favorites list so I can refere to it often --printer is out of ink so I can't print it now -lol
                    again your work amazes me
                    Sharon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Carter,

                      What do you refer to by "any Triple-Thick Glaze spray,"?

                      Thanks,
                      Marcel
                      http://marleb.com
                      DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                      NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That's what it's called. There are a number of brands. Krylon makes one that's good but takes a long time to dry. I find different brands at craft stores that work fine.

                        Carter

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would still like to use a pattern at least until I get a better handle on puzzle piece design. I found an even better program called Jigsaws Galore, http://www.dgray.com/

                          It allows you to easily select the number of pieces, the oddness???, and the % offun pieces. But Carter is right, there are many places where four pieces share the same corner. Another thing I noticed is that there are many pieces, at least in this configuration, that do not have locking lug.

                          Here is a picture created with Jigsaw Galore. This one has 70 pieces with 100% fun pieces
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by MinotBob; 03-28-2006, 08:32 AM.
                          MinotBob
                          Makita MSJ-401
                          Universal Tools:
                          Remember you only really need 2 tools: WD-40 and Duct Tape. If it doesn't move and should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the Duct Tape

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Carter,

                            I have a new goal. Try something along your lines of puzzle or at the very least try something a bit more outside the box. My problem has been limiting myself to child puzzles. I've fallen into this for three reasons, my skill, two kids (8,3), and limited available saw time.

                            Thanks for unintentionally throwing down the gauntlet.
                            Sawdust King

                            If there is one thing I can make perfect every time it is sawdust.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Toni,
                              I think Carter's suggestions are the best, but if you are looking to do the kind of puzzle that Puzzle Mania makes, looks like you could just freehand draw a grid across something the same size as your picture (like one of those clear sheets you can print transparencies in a copy machine on), fix it over your pic and then just cut the little locking tabs as you cut across. It looks like tab up, then tab down etc - all the way across. You could draw those in too, if you thought you needed them. Put it back together and cut the other way. It might get a bit boring, but you would have complete control over the size of pieces, and just how regular or irregular to make the grid.
                              After one or 2 you wouldn't need the grid anymore unless you changed the size of the pieces and couldn't "see" it, I think.
                              And t'would be cheaper than a program, and if you got off a line, who would know? Seems like the pattern printed right on the pic would show every tiny boo boo (not that I ever cut off the lines!)
                              Sandy

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