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  • pricing my work

    i have a problem with pricing my work are there any forms or small computer programs that will help

  • #2
    It is what you think your work is worth to you.yo'll never get paid for the time you spent to make anything.Figure the cost of material .

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    • #3
      For me this is the hardest thing. Some folks have a set hourly price. Some take the cost of materials and multiply by some factor. Some like me just go with your gut which is basically what wjbclocks1 said. It is further complicated by where you live and even the different venues in your area.
      Scott
      Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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      • #4
        I go by the hour. Figure out what you want to make per hour, then keep track of the time it takes to make your project. Some folks have timers to track down to the minute. I just round out 1/2 hour blocks. Once your project is done, and you've calculated the hours, add a percentage to cover materials, supplies. electricity, etc (I use 25%).

        You have a 12"X18" piece of 1/4 BB ply. You want to cut 3" ornaments out of it, which should give you 24 ornaments. Cutting the 3" squares, stacking them, applying patterns, and finally cutting them - takes about 8 hours (I'm slow at fretwork).

        You want to make $15 per hour -- 8 X $15 = $120 - plus 25% for materials = $150

        $150/ 24 ornaments = $6.25 per ornament.

        Plug in your own values for the calculation. If you are using exotic woods, figure in the additional cost for the exotics. If you are developing your own patterns, figure in pattern development and, maybe, put the patterns up for sale. Don't forget that prices of materials and supplies are continuously rising - you may need to increase the percentage at some point.

        At the craft show or art faire - if people think your prices are high - don't negotiate. You aren't running a garage sale or flea market.
        Tony

        My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

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        • #5
          I am one that multiplies. I calculate cost of material an multiply by 5.
          Denny
          ArtCrafters in Dayton, TN

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          • #6
            Adding to the above ideas, for custom pieces if someone asks me to make something I will enjoy making or will be for a good cause then I may price the item on the lower end. If my gut says the customer will be a pain in the rump or it's a piece I don't really want to do, then I price it high and build in an additional "PIA" factor (Pain In Arse) to make it worth the aggrevation.
            Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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            • #7
              Basically it’s a crap shoot. Helpful, huh? Basically what Scott said. Also do the better shows. School shows are a bust and I haven’t done one in 15-20 years. Shows where people pay admission are your better shows. If your fee is high for a show, check it out first before you apply. How good is the promoter? Location, all handmade or buy and sell? All that goes into pricing. Don’t be afraid to price high. If you were going to sell something for $30; make it $40 and see what happens. My best seller is the Sealife puzzle and I always sell at least 2, most times 4 or 5. I sell them for $40. Location also plays a part. I live by the Chesapeake bay so anything nautical usually sells. I’m sure it wouldn’t sell in the middle of the country. The cross I sold for $60 and it took about 1 1/2 hours to drill and cut. Good luck.
              Attached Files
              Betty

              "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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              • #8
                Using a multiplier does not work for me. Case in point I make an angle ornament. I sell 50-60 per year. I get 144 ornaments out of a 5'x5' piece of Baltic Birch. Working with round numbers the plywood is $20 and I get 144 ornaments out of it. So that is $0.14 in material each. If I multiplied by 5 that would mean selling them for $0.70 each. I sell them for $5.00 each.
                Scott
                Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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                • #9
                  I have a mixture of pricing. For my ornaments I use 1/16 thick ply (1.5 mm), all of my ornaments are 4 x 4 inches $.29 per square. Stack cut 6 at a time, cut and finish 1 hour for the six I sell them for $10 - $12 each in a nice box that costs me $.50.
                  The rest of my items are dependent on wood, time spent and vary from $25 to $250. Those prices will go up when I start to sell my Intarsia pieces.
                  Rolf
                  RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                  Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                  Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                  And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                  • #10
                    What Scott said again. I figure on paying myself $30 an hour, this just includes from the time I get the wood into the house, Bruce preps it, and I do my magic on it to finishing. I have nothing less than $5 to sell and that is my giftcard holders. Everything is $10 and up. My baskets go from $20 to $80. During the holidays, I sell lots of $65 - $80 baskets. RJ, notice time again. And look who was on last night with me - Linda!!!
                    Betty

                    "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                    • #11
                      Good afternoon Betty, glad to see you are up and about, in that one picture of your display I see you sell bread also, how do you find the time, RJ
                      Life Begins @ 190 MPH

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                      • #12
                        😂😂😂 that was the people in the space next to me. Perfect spot to sell my “bread” baskets. And their bread is awesome.
                        Betty

                        "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by will8989 View Post
                          Basically it’s a crap shoot. Helpful, huh? Basically what Scott said. Also do the better shows. School shows are a bust and I haven’t done one in 15-20 years. Shows where people pay admission are your better shows. If your fee is high for a show, check it out first before you apply. How good is the promoter? Location, all handmade or buy and sell? All that goes into pricing. Don’t be afraid to price high. If you were going to sell something for $30; make it $40 and see what happens. My best seller is the Sealife puzzle and I always sell at least 2, most times 4 or 5. I sell them for $40. Location also plays a part. I live by the Chesapeake bay so anything nautical usually sells. I’m sure it wouldn’t sell in the middle of the country. The cross I sold for $60 and it took about 1 1/2 hours to drill and cut. Good luck.
                          Somewhat OT:
                          Betty,
                          Your photos show the shrink wrap. What do you use to shrink-wrap your puzzle pieces as you do?
                          Hank Lee
                          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted.

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                          • #14
                            O by the way Betty your work is beautiful especially that angel, RJ
                            Life Begins @ 190 MPH

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                            • #15
                              I bought a heat gun as a hairdryer didn’t get hot enough. But you need to be careful not to get it too hot or the shrink wrap gets holes. I also use clear tape as invisible tape turns white when you heat it and looks awful even if it is on the back. We use the heat gun a lot so it was a good equipment investment.
                              Last edited by will8989; 04-18-2019, 08:32 AM.
                              Betty

                              "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

                              Comment

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