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  • a few questions

    I have a few questions if anyone would be so kind to help me out with.

    1. I have a project that has a small defect in it. It's on the backside but with this particular piece it can be viewed from either side. My question is, when someone expresses interest in it, should I make them aware of it at that time or do I put a neon sign showing there is a defect and point where it's at? I don't want to mark it down because I don't feel it's that bad. I would rather enjoy it at home for myself if I mark it down any further since it took me a while to make.

    2. I am new to craft shows and was curious if it's a good idea to give receipts for purchases? I would have to handwrite them out since I don't have a register.

    3. I read on several posts that it's a good idea to have business cards. Right now this is a hobby that I run as a very small side business and since I have a day job, I don't want another full time job. So, I am not wanting a bunch of phone calls with a whole lot of orders to stress me out. I want to be able to enjoy my hobby. On the other hand, I might seem more legitimate if I did have business cards. How about not putting my phone # on the card and just e-mail?

    Thanks for any input. It's nice to have access to all the experience out there!

  • #2
    morning, nicholas,
    i tell people that i've been married twice and that makes me either an expert on marriage or proves i have NO idea about marriage. that being said, i've done a few craft shows so that makes me an expert or proves i have NO idea what i'm doing.

    i will, however, give you my opinion on your questions.

    1.don't include the "defective" piece in your booth if you have to explain that it's marred. it makes you appear to be "less than" and one of the things we sell is craftsmanship. ya oughta be soooo proud of all your work and apologizing or pointing out faults could make a customer suspect your other works.

    2.i don't think most people expect a receipt but if they ask you could write them one. i wouldn't worry about it.

    3.i don't include my phone number on my business cards. i like e-mail and if i get a customer from my card who has questions that can't be answered effectively by e-mail, i then give them my phone number. a website is a wonnnderful tool in sales and i've found more and more that a lot of people just want to first visit your website to get an idea of what you've done and what you can do.

    i understand about the added stress of having to "work after work". if it appears to be work, then it ain't any fun. you are at a point where you can "just say no" to commissions and requests if you need to.

    now, you can just throw out everything i said in part #3. if you only want to do craft shows and no additonal work, i don't know that i'd even have cards available. "what you see is what you get" for the customers.

    btw, for anyone who doesn't have a website because it appears to be complicated, expensive, daunting, whatever, you might check out www.blogspot.com for an easier, free "webpage". i think you'll like it. for those who feel led to pay me for this wonderful information, you can send a check, but i'd rather you just call me and i'll come pick it up :-).

    as my sainted mother used to say to us kids, "you kids go outside and play!"

    jim

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    • #3
      Hey Nick,
      I would take the defective piece out of your inventory & enjoy it yourself. I would do this with any defective piece as you want to develope a reputation for doing topnotch work. Just my opinion.

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with Randy. If I am not happy with it then I wont sell it.
        How about a picture to give us a better idea of your dilema.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

        Comment


        • #5
          G'day Nick,
          Mark it down!
          There would hardly be a piece made by anybody, that I couldn't pick up and find some sort of defect.

          also, show the piece to others, and see if they pic up the fault. You having made the article will be the most critical, and others may not even notice or realise that there is a problem.

          Carting goods backwards and forwards to markets, I always have pieces that get knocked a bit, or get a bit grubby. I usually put these aside and at the end of the year have a sale section on the table, with a sign stating that these are slightly damaged/shop soiled and prices are reduced by a percentage.

          A lot of people are appreciative at the chance to buy a quality piece of work at a reduced price and most can't even find the fault.
          Regards
          John
          "The Golden Mile"John Wayne
          Some of my Stuff
          Retired Medically Unfit Police Officers ***.

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          • #6
            I didn't give any thought about not selling it. That's a good point about only selling top quality. I'm very picky about my work as I'm sure you all are. I thought about displaying it but put a little sign on it saying "not for sale". Maybe that would make them want it more. I took a couple of pictures of the problem and I'm going to try my best to attach them so you know what I'm referring to. The story behind this is, I started this project (it's an eagle) when I first started scrolling and I decided it would look good in 3/4" cherry. Big mistake. I went through so many blades. As you all probably know (and now so do I) cherry is susceptible to burning and goes through blades. Anyway, I got about 75% done and let it set in the corner for about a year and one day thought "I have to do something with this thing". So I thought I would run it through a planer to thin it down to a manageable thickness. The worst that could happen is it ruins it but at that point I didn't care. Well, it turned out better than I expected except for that one spot. The planer knife took a little piece of wood out.

            That's the story behind my dilemma. I hope the pictures attach o.k.
            Thanks everyone for the fantastic advice!!!
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              I think I would try and reshape that little wing piece with the saw or a file and sandpaper. Remember the finished product doesnt have to be the same as the pattern. You can make all the changes you wish. I think there would be a way to make that area a correct part of the Eagle. If that doesnt work I think I would mark it down or place in on my Mantle.

              Just my opinion,
              Gary
              HELP!! Im stuck in Reno and I can see Sparks!

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              • #8
                It's always difficult, as a seller, to decide what is simply an imperfection, which literally every piece we make has, and what is a serious enough flaw to warrant either not selling a piece or marking it down. I would personally put your "defect" in the "point it out and mark it down" category. It's still a beautiful piece of work, one both you and a buyer can be proud of, but some buyers are extremely fussy and if they notice something after purchasing, they will not be happy.

                I never put my phone number on a business card, just my email and website, and if you don't have a website, then just use the email. But if you are interested in expanding your business at all, a website is a very good thing to have now that the majority of people/potential customers are online. They're fabulous for repeat business.

                Lou
                www.woodbylouise.ca

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                • #9
                  Well, I have the eagle fixed. I cut the bad piece out per Gary in Nevada. It looks great! I can't even tell there was ever a problem. Thanks for all the advice everyone!!!!

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                  • #10
                    onya Nick,
                    There's usually always more than one way to skin a cat.
                    Regards
                    John
                    "The Golden Mile"John Wayne
                    Some of my Stuff
                    Retired Medically Unfit Police Officers ***.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i dont think that the flaw is something i would of worried about.

                      scrollsawing is "hand cut" so an occasional "flaw" to me just make it look hand made and not laser cut.

                      any pieces i show people i tell them a price for as is. after seeing the eagle if i was going to purchase it i wouldnt even think twice about the little flaw that you had.

                      but glad you could fix the problem. as someone told me when i started "once the pattern is removed on you know if you made a mistake"


                      just my opinion

                      kendall

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                      • #12
                        Well, Nick, I would keep it for myself & plane another piece & cut a new one for sale. Or don't you feel like doing another one. I agree also that you could trim that area out & make whatever changes you want to correct the problem. Good Luck. -- Perk
                        PERK

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                        • #13
                          I think it looks great. anyone know where this pattern comes from? I really like it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Lots of good advice I can use for myself. Your cure is a cure I use often maybe fix it, if I don't like it I won't give as a gift or sell it. I have lots of scrap projects around my shop. It gives my shop character. Doug
                            Taking It Real Easy
                            Doug

                            Doug's Wood Puzzles and Gallery

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ubgoofy2003 View Post
                              Well, Nick, I would keep it for myself & plane another piece & cut a new one for sale. Or don't you feel like doing another one. I agree also that you could trim that area out & make whatever changes you want to correct the problem. Good Luck. -- Perk
                              I see that you have all ready made a fix to the project. but if another similar mistake comes up that can not be fixed. I would take it out of your sale inventory. Most people would over look something that small. But the public never hears them. The ones that make the most noise and let every one know will be sure to notice and let every one they see know about it too...... Nice cutting by the way.


                              www.pajarostudiowns.com
                              Excalibur EX-21 fanatic
                              One of the Chosen few



                              "The Rumors Of My Demise Have Been Greatly Exaggerated......I am retired!!!!!!!".

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