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  • #16
    Garry and Rolf, thanks so much for the suggestions. I will try both of your recommendations, and let you know how it goes. I imagine sawing in an upright position should make turning corners a bit easier. And I do now remember the manual talking about the stroke length, so I may try to alter that. I'll send a picture soon of what I've been experimenting with. So far, it is all working pretty well and I'm really looking forward to experimenting with different woods, different thicknesses, different textures. So much to learn, but your advice has been very helpful. More soon.

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    • #17
      Some thoughts on your questions: Occasionally my entry hole shows, and this is how I minimize it. I sand the issue away on both pieces, if necessary, then after gluing the inlay in place and allowing it to dry I make a mixture of sanding dust of the background wood, mixed with white glue, to the consistency of mayonnaise. I apply this where needed, using a credit card as a squeegee and sand flat after it dries. (10 minutes) This just gives a slight, filled in, gap at the edge of the inlay but unless you point it out no one will notice it.
      I use some veneer that was given to me, and I just glue it to a thicker substrate of pine and then inlay this. The issue with this method is when sanding the front flat one can easily sand through a very thin veneer. 1/8" thick is no problem but less can be.
      I have learned, while teaching others to do inlay, that lots of experience at a scroll saw before doing inlay is a great help. The very first inlay I tried was good enough to sell, and I did sell it. I had been making toys before that and could follow the lines and could make rather sharp turns as well.
      I sell my inlays at many street fairs and have only seen one other guy offering inlays. (Poorly done) Lots of others selling wood items but no other offering inlayed items. Where I sell now, every Saturday, there are five others offering wood products but mine are the only inlays there.
      Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
      "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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      • #18
        Bruce has small containers of fine sawdust. Of course he does. I put a drop of wood glue in the gap, sprinkle the sawdust on generously, let dry and hand sand. Sometime if the space was deep, I apply it a second time. The space is never to be seen again. This has saved many projects for me. Sounds like you found your niche for your products. Any pictures?
        Betty

        "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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        • #19
          Originally posted by ErinH View Post
          Garry and Rolf, thanks so much for the suggestions. I will try both of your recommendations, and let you know how it goes. I imagine sawing in an upright position should make turning corners a bit easier. And I do now remember the manual talking about the stroke length, so I may try to alter that. I'll send a picture soon of what I've been experimenting with. So far, it is all working pretty well and I'm really looking forward to experimenting with different woods, different thicknesses, different textures. So much to learn, but your advice has been very helpful. More soon.
          Erin the Stroke on a saw is fixed as is the throat or distance between the top blade clamp and the table. All determined by the saws design.
          My EX- 16 has a .7" stroke and can cut up to 2" thick
          My Hawk G4 -26 has a 3/4 " stroke and can cut up to 2-5/8" that is really pushing the limits. I have cut 2" wood on my Hawk but at that point I would rather use a bandsaw.
          Rolf
          RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
          Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
          Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
          And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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          • #20
            Thanks guys. I've been away from my shop and computer for a while, and won't really be back in the swing of things till later in the fall, but I am still very excited about this technique. I'm going to try to attach a photo so you can see what I'm up to. I want to have a 3D surface, so the inlaid piece is proud. It is also textured and colored. First step in what I hope will be an interesting journey. I'll be back in a few weeks, after my husband's surgery, to ask for more advice! 469145A0-8C7B-4A5B-9A3D-EC9C25201BF1.jpg

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