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  • bashkir scroller
    replied
    You should listen to them all Jeff!.I know I would buy a book with unstructioins as clear as yours. You have covered every step very well. Wonderful piece!

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  • bashkir scroller
    replied
    Thank you for an amazing tutorial. Just love the end result!

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  • workin for wood
    replied
    Finale

    Here is the picture when finished. Unfortunately, the apple is very difficult to photograph...it looks just like porcelain.

    Kate Beckinsale...Vampire in "Underworld" the movie. 70 pcs. 11"x11"
    aprox 20 hrs to completion.
    Attached Files

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  • workin for wood
    replied
    Finishing

    There are many choices for finishes. Most of my pictures are first finished with a teak oil and then a few coats of semi-gloss polyurethane. The teak oil is more for UV protection than anything else. This picture is going straight to spray because there is no wood here that requires protection. It will actually be a benefit for the apple, which is her face, to darken a bit over time, and the bloodwood/her lips will look better darker too.
    The tip here is to make yourself a nail board. This is the simplest finishing tool. see picture, it is simply a scrap 1/2 plywood with tons of nails driven through it with a brad nailer. If you don't have a brad nailer, I'm sure you can find a local contractor or cabinet maker that will drive nails through your scrap of plywood for you at a cost that should probably be nothing. The idea is that you finish both sides of your picture at the same time. The bottom will sit on the nails and the nails will do almost no damage at all. When finishing, you should ideally have the same amount of finish on all sides of the project. Spray the bottom first, then set it on the nails and spray the sides and the top...then walk away. Come back, sand, remove dust and repeat spraying. Any spray on the nails won't hurt a thing!
    When the finish is dry, you simply need to apply a hook and hang it on the wall!
    Attached Files

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  • workin for wood
    replied
    Making a Backer

    A free flowing intarsia such as this should have a backer to make it look more complete. If you put all your skills to work to do your very best on the picture, then you wouldn't want to just slap a backer on and call it good. The back of the picture is almost as important as the front. The backer will hide any small gaps, allow a spot for a hanger and a place to sign your work...Don't forget to sign your work!
    In picture 1, the picture is clamped to the ugly side of a piece of 1/8 plywood. Use real plywood with a plywood core. Trace the picture with a sharp pencil in all places that a pencil can reach. It tight places such as this picture has, an awl is used to scratch the plywood and then a pencil will be used later to darken the scratches so that they can be seen better while cutting. This awl is actually a 3 1/2 inch framing nail that is sanded on a belt sander to a long thin point ! Total cost of tool..under a penny. Remove clamps, pencil in the awl scratches and then erase any pencil marks left on the bottom edge of the actual picture.
    Cut out the backer, slow and easy with a new and sharp blade, preferably a reverse tooth blade. The lines that are easily sanded on the spindle sander later are cut on the outside. The lines that go deep into the v grooves will be cut on the inside of the line. This is because it will be difficult to sand the backer flush to the picture in those areas. When finished, ignore any tearout, just leave it alone for now. Test fit the backer to the picture to be sure that the v groove areas do not stick out past the picture. Spread glue on the backer with a brush or scrap of wood...make it nice and even, not too thick. Place picture on backer and align it, then walk away for 5 min. Come back to picture and see if it slides around on backer. If not, then begin clamping the backer to the picture. If you clamp too early, the backer will slide around and become out of alignment, so this is why I let the glue set up a bit first.
    After a few hours, remove clamps. Use spindle sander to clean up any edges to flush them with picture wherever possible. In pic 2, the backer where it meets into the points is beveled back. Not the whole backer, just where the points are. This will prevent the backer from ever getting caught on something and breaking at those weaker spots. Sand the backer smooth and sign the picture with a non-bleeding black marker.
    Attached Files

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  • workin for wood
    replied
    Kevin. It is very difficult to explain how to actually carve something. I'm certainly not the right person to teach that skill. I am just naturally able to make it look decent. I do think the biggest key to carving is to use a saw to get your piece to the closest possible shape that it will end up. With this piece, you know you have a face cut out. The nose is cut seperately, but it is glued on top..so you don't have to grind away tons of wood and guess where the nose will be. Your just carving away to the final shape with whatever tools you might have. I use a foredom professional carver because the dremel is just to big to hold on to, where as the foredom is more like a dentist drill. I start with big hogging burr bits and work down to carbide bits...begin with digging out the eyes and up over then down the forhead. Then dig out the bottom of the nose and around under the nostrils a bit. I picked her nose with a 1/8 inch round carbide cutter. I use a super fine wire brush to smooth out in the most difficult to sand areas ...that's a power carver wire brush btw. And about 1 1/2 hrs of hand sanding to remove any gouges and polish away any scratches.
    To make a pattern, I do one or the other. Some are just freehand and some, like this, are tracings. This is from a poster of hers, so the picture proportions are dead on, no doubt! And sometimes a mix and match of many methods to come up with something new.
    How big is a good question...now I have to go back into the snow...
    It is a square, 11" x 11 "

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  • bearfretworks
    replied
    Originally posted by Janette
    Only 1 - 2 intarsia articles per issue? I think you could fit in another one or 2


    or...you could make more issues! (hint hint!!!)
    AMEN to that....especially the MORE ISSUES suggestion!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • workin for wood
    replied
    Perhaps I need to edit my remark. When I say no one is interested in an article...I'm saying that People are not interested in anything I've submitted to date and by knowing that there are so many submissions and acceptances already, that it would be a long way down the road if I was ever to be seen in a magazine. But ya'll will still find me sneaking in through competitions on the road. I haven't given up on submitting articles, I just don't have anything right now to submit...I'm sure they wouldn't have wanted Kate for an article.
    And I am not sure I would know how to right a book. Besides, there's already alot of books on intarsia out there, how many do you need?
    I'm building them for the fun of it...and sharing the information I teach myself along the way makes me feel like I can give something back to the community, even if it's pretty minor. It's not like I have alot of money that I can donate to the cure for cancer. Appreciate all the nice comments and encouragement though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Janette
    replied
    Only 1 - 2 intarsia articles per issue? I think you could fit in another one or 2


    or...you could make more issues! (hint hint!!!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin12
    replied
    And now, after all that, a few simple questions:

    I think there's actually quite a lot behind your comments, "out comes the grinders, carvers, knives and face mask." and "With the face carved and sanded down ..." This seems like sculptering, which is an art in itself. Or does it simply boil down to using whatever tools are necessary to gradually remove and sand away wood until it looks right? This is obviously not a job for a router. Or do you use a Dremel-type of tool?

    How do you make your patterns? I think you said once that you use good ol' pencil, paper, and simply trace the pattern from a photo.

    What are the dimensions of Kate?
    (Oh, you know what I mean!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin12
    replied
    Jeff, please listen to Bob. Just because there's not a spot in a mag for you now doesn't mean you can't sell articles like crazy in the future, even if "future" means years -- IF you keep banging on editors doors now, and keep it up. And as for books -- have you drafted a chapter or two with a table of contents and approached publishers? I used to write fiction as a "hobby", and there's a saying in that biz that "it takes ten years to become an overnight success."

    I would buy your books. I think it's obvious that a number (a lot!) of people here would. And I bet if a poll were taken, you could easily compete with Judy Gale Roberts, Kathy Wise, Janette, etc.

    I am, of course, assuming that you would WANT to be published. Maybe you don't, and that's fine. (You want to keep the art you make, not sell it like many do. And that's fine, too.) However, you do have a gift for the art of intarsia as well as a desire to share your experience. That sharing is just another word for teaching / instructing / writing. Just look at what you've done here. You've obviously loved doing it, and so many of us have gotten so much out of your posts (which we could almost call self-published articles).

    I'm not trying to blow rainbows at you. I merely mean to encourage you if you do want to get published. It's not necessarily easy to break in, but I bet there are people here who could help if you wanted.

    Love your work.
    And your instruction.
    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobD
    replied
    Part of the problem is that we work at least 1 year to 1.5 years in advance...and we've already gotten 1-2 intarsia articles in each of the issues...

    So the short answer, Barry...is at least a year and a half from now, at the latest.

    Jeff is in a difficult position because he's got to compete with people like Judy Gale Roberts, Kathy Wise, Janette, and others who already have their submissions in...

    We do have another Best Project Design contest coming up soon...that's how we discovered Janette, and that's how Dale Helgerson is getting published...Listening Jeff?????

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • bearfretworks
    replied
    Originally posted by owler
    Bob D,

    Where do I send my check for a pre-order of Jeff's book?
    Or, as a loyal and faithful subscriber, when can I expect to see one of Jeff's articles in this magazine????

    Leave a comment:


  • owler
    replied
    Bob D,

    Where do I send my check for a pre-order of Jeff's book?

    Leave a comment:


  • workin for wood
    replied
    squaring blade deflections

    Remember that an oscillating spindle sander was used almost as much as a scroll saw. Any one will work, but I can't stress enough the benefit of the Jet because of the 1/4 spindle. When cutting hardwoods especially, deflection is sure to happen while cutting with the grain and when turning corners. Deflection is when the blade bows inside the cut making an unsquare cut. You will minimize deflection by using a bigger blade which also allows more tension to be applied, as well as by slowing down your feed rate, but you'll never completely eliminate it. I run all pieces through the spindle sander to verify they are square. Any pieces that will be exposed to be the outside of the picture are also spindle sanded to remove any sawmarks. In a gang cut, the pieces that are cut side by side do not get sanded in between but the two outer pieces get spindle sanded on their ouside edges. When gang cut..the pieces will automatically match, but the next set will need a square edge to fit against. When cutting any part to go beside another part, it is difficult for the parts to be flush at the outside of their edges...the spindle sander is used to sand the two pieces together. When gang cutting hair of feathers, all the parts fit tight, but the ends are no longer flush...such as in this picture, all the places where the hair meets the face are not flush..they are all off my a minute amount. Once all the pieces are cut and taped, the spindle sander is used to flush all the pieces together so that the inside face will be a nice easy smooth cut. So you can see how important a tool the spindle sander is for making all your intarsias gap free and having smooth flowing edges. I find in most situations a curve will not be smaller than 1/4 inch but in many cases a curve is smaller than a 1/2, so a 1/2 spindle is just not maximizing the potential use of the tool in this particular field of scrolling.

    With a spindle sander, there is a gap between the spindle and the insert, just like with a scroll saw. A sacrificial piece of plywood is placed on top and formed to be a zero clearance top. This is how I sand and flush the small pieces or small groups of pieces such as an eye. The smaller the pieces, the more likely out of square they will be.
    Last edited by workin for wood; 03-07-2007, 02:15 PM.

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