Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Intrasia

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    My first scrollsaw was one speed and took pin only, not good. My second had variable speed and took pin and non-pin ends, thats good. Some projects fast speeds some not. The best part is to have fun. GOOD LUCK TO ALL 8)

    Leave a comment:


  • will8989
    replied
    Re: Intrasia

    I have a hegner and love it! I also have the magnifying light, foot pedal, blower & variable speed. Funny thing is, with the light I STILL go off the lines!

    Leave a comment:


  • BobD
    replied
    Re: Intrasia

    The light would be great!!!
    We're still in the process of organizing our in house shop, and the lighting for where the scroll saws are set up is terrible. I have trouble telling when I'm on or off the lines until it is too late!!!

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    I have the DeWalt and love it! Bought a factory reconditioned thru http://www.toolking.com and free shipping, have bought a number of tools from them, hard to beat their prices! (I bought with the stand and light...good accessories!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    FYI, in my shop I have 5 scroll saws of diff. sizes. a Craftsman Professional, an RBI -(early model) and two Delta models, had a Dremel but gave it to a young man starting out in woodworking, not that it would work for everyone but I don't like having to fight blades in and out of the various pieces Im working on. For a limited budget, the Delta bench top units are ok. for a floor model with some beef in it the Craftsman is the way to go. as for the others it comes down to how much money you want to spend. I sould mention that I have accumulated my tools over several years and have not always bought new. But beware if you buy used equipment - you get what you pay for...sometimes!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    hummm,

    i thought the cheap harbor freight 79.00 scrollsaw might be good enough, but if its just gonna be bench fodder, i sears has provided 'enough of that already'..

    guess theres always christmas, fathers day, birthday, and grandparents day to hope for....

    we had a black and decker at the votech-collage. it was a blade eater, and worst thing i ever seen to change a blade in.
    it wouldnt cut 90 degree through the material, and shook so bad..

    i did better work with a coping saw.

    but everybody had a turn at the school saw, so it might not be a proper assement of the quality of black and deckse tools.

    thomp


    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    In my opinion, the best saw for the best price is the Grizzly G0555 (I think thats the number) comes with the fence and square included in price, but also comes with the automatic tension adjustment! Good feature. I have a Ridgid, I like it, but had to pay extra for the fence and square, and no tension adjust. plus about 150.00 more ??? :

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    Yup ... Two things I can tell you for sure:
    1) You don't want a real cheap scroll saw
    2) You don't want a bench top band saw.

    I've only had three saws:
    Ryobi, DeWalt, and RBI Hawk. The Ryobi was junk, the RBI Hawk best be a mile but also most expensive by a mile, of the three on a limited budget I would recommend the DeWalt. I'm sure there are others, but those are the ones I've had experience with.

    If they are out of your price range right now, bite the bullet and save up. You won't be sorry you did.

    For a band saw, I'd say the absolute minimum would be a 10' floor model (some models can be removed from their stand and bolted to a bench). I've got a 12' and am seriously considering going to a 14'. The bench tops models typically limit you to about a 3.5 to 4' vertical cut.

    Am real curious about what others have to say...

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    I been carving for years, and love to experiment with other fassets of art fourms, but it all takes specialized tools.

    as im deciding the end use of a new tool as well, havent decided between a bench top bandsaw, or a scroll saw.

    while a bandsaw would give me another great toy, to resaw lumber and make great curves. as it provides good clean 90 degree inside corners that a jigsaw can never make, you cant get very intricate with ither as you can with a scroll saw.

    as to the brand of either i cant afford a lot on any of them, harbor freight had a scroll saw for $74.00 that i was thinking about purchacing, but doing delecate fret work or intarsia im afraid that the cheap scroll saw would just shake the material apart after it was in the weakened state just pryor to completion...
    or am i looking at it the wrong way...
    thomp

    Leave a comment:


  • jttheclockman
    replied
    Re: Intrasia

    INtarsia is an artform of woodworking where the pieces are cut seperastly and then sanded and contoured to fit next to the last piece cut. There are different ways of making the pieces stand proud of one another and to get into it may take some doing so I would suggest if you are serious about this artform you can get books out there that will explain and show the proper way of doing this. You can also do a web search for I bet there are sites that can explain this. Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    intrasia,

    when you cut out the segments, are they stacked?

    like a plank of cherry, maple, burch, walnut and so on,

    then the pattern is traced on the top piece of wood?

    i have often wondered if it was done that way or if you cut each piece out at a time. ?

    thomp

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    You don't need to spend $500 on scroll saw to do intarsia. You can buy a cheap one at Home Depot for under $100.00 cdn. I have used the cheaper ones and they will do the job if you make sure the blade is in tight enough. I have a Dremel Scroll saw and it is super to use, it was $329 cdn at HomeDepot. Buying a scroll saw is money well spent. I use my Dremel Multipro to round off the edges when I do intarsia.
    Barb

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    You still need the scrollsaw for marquetry and intarsia LOL : You are going to be very busy, trying to learn all three LOL!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    OK, you peeked my interest. Where did these unique terms come from? I found this in an online search: 'Italian authorities have suggested that the word 'intarsia' derives from the Latin verb interserere, which means 'to insert.' These authorities classify intarsia pieces as 'sectile' (in which fragments of wood or other material are inserted into the wood surface), and 'pictorial' (in which the pieces completely cover the ground).

    Early Italian intarsia was sectile -- done by gouging out a shape in the ground wood (backing) and inlaying a cut piece into that ground. Usually this process was used to decorate furniture or window frames, and consisted of repeating intricate patterns -- either organic or geometric.

    Today, the definition of intarsia is much more focussed than it was. The practice of intarsia still involves gluing cut pieces of wood onto a ground, but usually the pieces are of varying thickness, thus creating a relief image out of wood.

    The process of inlaying one wood into another is now referred to as marquetry, but more resembles the traditional definition of intarsia than do the modern day relief images. The real difference with marquetry, however, is that the veneer is much thinner, and therefore is cut using a different process. Rather than sawing off slabs that are about a 1/4' thick, modern marquetry uses veneer that has been shaved off of the tree, so that it's often thinner than 1/16'. As a result, one doesn't need a saw to construct the wood inlay, but can instead use an X-acto knife.'

    Does anyone use an x-acto knife? Maybe I don't need to spend $500 on a scroll saw? Hard to believe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Intrasia

    Ya!

    Leave a comment:

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X