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  • Flex Drum Sander Opinions?

    Hi All,

    I would like any kind of input I can get on the Flex Drum setups, or what ever kinds of sanding methods that this bunch of talent has to offer.
    I am thinking of using a bench grinder (Ryobi 6") for the motor, or I have a 1/2hp craftsman motor, but I think they might have too many rpm (@3450rpm).
    Any help will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks, oops99
    oops99



    KEEP THE PIECE
    Glue it back on, they'll never notice.

    DW788

  • #2
    I use the flex drum sanders from JGR almost exclusively for my shaping. I mount them on a drill press with the speed about 1725 (I think that's about the max you want to have for these).

    The only thing I don't like about them is if you press too hard, you'll "burn" grooves in the foam part and sometimes the sanding pad slides up and down. I've used the little abrasive strips they come with and tried 2 sided carpet tape but still have trouble.

    Overall, they're great and I swear by them. I just got a rougher one (100 grit) for rough shaping and find I don't have to press nearly as hard. Could be part of my problem is I use them forever and as the grit disappears, I just push harder.

    Good price too!
    Janette
    www.square-designs.com

    Comment


    • #3
      I use the flex drum sanders also but I have mine mounted on a 1750 rpm motor shaft. An old washing machine motor might work fine. I also got mine from JGR. I don't have any problem with mine slipping at all, it might be a new type shaft because I didn't get any abrasive strips with mine. The sander works great, so far I have no problem with the foam burning either. I highly recommend them.

      Chris
      Attached Files
      What! There's no coffee?!!

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      • #4
        I use the same thing but get them from Seyco. You can't go wrong with them. I have never had any slippage problems and the sanding sleeves are super durable. I use 100 grit on one shaft of the motor and 220 on the other shaft. 100 grit works pretty good to round and shape then the 220 does almost all the finish sanding.
        If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

        Comment


        • #5
          I would love to see someone mount one of them sanding sleeves onto the end of a weed wacker. Gas powered of course. You could mount your wood in a vice and grind away without fear of touching the sandpaper.
          Jeff Powell

          Comment


          • #6
            I purchased a set of 3 inflatable drum sanders. I can't remmember where. The set was reasonably inexpensive and works great. I chuck mine in my lathe
            or now on the end of my sand-flee (1725 rpm)
            Rolf
            RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
            Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
            Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
            And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a variable speed delta grinder the gets below 1800 RPM. They work great. If you use a sanding stick to remove wood and resin from the sand papaer, the sleeves last a long time. Good control at the low speed too.
              Dan

              -Just do'in the best I can every day

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              • #8
                Like Rolf I also use inflatable drum sanders. Works great. I may buy a sanding star some day to see if it does anythying different. It will get into tight corners. For now I use my Dremel for that work which has not been excessive. Like Owler mentions, I also use Crepe Blocks to keep the sanding drums like new.
                Bob
                Scrolling satisfies the passion for intricate creativity. My saw is an Excalibur EX21.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bob in Whitby
                  Like Rolf I also use inflatable drum sanders. Works great. I may buy a sanding star some day to see if it does anythying different. It will get into tight corners. For now I use my Dremel for that work which has not been excessive. Like Owler mentions, I also use Crepe Blocks to keep the sanding drums like new.
                  Bob
                  I just got a mop sander for Christmas and don't know how I ever did without it! It's great for easing the edges and getting the scratches from areas the flex drum can't reach. I use a dremel sometimes too but find that it always scratches and they're hard to remove.
                  Janette
                  www.square-designs.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I also use inflatable drum sanders and the flex drum sander which I mainly use to put a dish shape on pieces such as ears. the reason for this is the flex drum sander allows you to sand past the end without damaging your piece because of the soft foam core. I also have a sanding mop and I love it it takes away almost all the need to hand sand, but it cannot be used on soft woods such as WRC.I have my flex drum sander mounted on one side of a variable speed grinder and have a wonder wheel from JGR mounted on the other the side for texturizing my piece if needed.
                    Last edited by intarsiabill; 01-19-2007, 12:33 PM.
                    Bill



                    Excalibur Ex-30

                    www.redrocstudios.com

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                    • #11
                      I have the JGR sanders mounted on a 3450 motor because I had that motor and just used it. It does make a lot of sawdust and keeps the dust collector busy. If you get too agressive you can heat up the foam and damage it and after I did just that, I just sanded on other parts of the sleeve.

                      Jay

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jayintarsia01
                        I have the JGR sanders mounted on a 3450 motor because I had that motor and just used it. It does make a lot of sawdust and keeps the dust collector busy. If you get too agressive you can heat up the foam and damage it and after I did just that, I just sanded on other parts of the sleeve.

                        Jay
                        I'm terrible for doing that! I just put numerous "grooves" into a pretty new one (after I promised myself I'd be careful). It makes it a little trickier. But...for the money ($4.95) they last a good long time. I just take my old ones to use for sanding backers or extra fine sanding.
                        Janette
                        www.square-designs.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Seems that a lot of people like sanding mops and flex drum sander's. I put on a liquid wood stablizer (Like woodturners use) clear coat for softer woods. Then you can use a sanding mop on WRC if you use silica sand mops. I use them all the time and in 400 grit, I can put a high polished finiish on most soft woods that you almost can use as a mirror. I start with 180 grit and then work my way up to 400 or even 600 grit silica! Speed and light hand pressure is also a factor! I have learned to cut shop costs, by making all of my
                          mops

                          ANYWHO.....THAT WORKS FOR ME!

                          Rick
                          Old Scrollers Never Die...They Just Saw Away!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't use a flex drum sander, I just use the end of the big stationary belt sander which has alot of power for grinding, but also gives me a large flat surface as well. I also have an oscilating spindle sander. I have a drill attachment similar to a sanding mop, but the "mop" last much longer and doesn't "throp" the wood. I buy them through a friend because you need a business to place an order, and they are not cheap. The company is Dynabrade, I do know that. The sandpaper is on both sides of the fingers and mounted on a cloth which slowly breaks off as the ends of the paper wear down. It's not good if the abrasive wears off and then your beating/thropping your wood with paper or cloth. I've had that happen with some other mops and it deffinitely affects the finish where you have shiny and dull spots instead of a nice even shine.
                            Jeff Powell

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My wife bought me the Jett spindle sander for Christmas. I have been playing around a bit with it and I think it will become a major workhorse in my shop.
                              I just designed a roll around cabinet for it that puts the top at 40" above the floor. I think that will be a good height for me.
                              Rolf
                              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                              Comment

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