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New Inlays - sailboat & birdhouse

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  • New Inlays - sailboat & birdhouse

    The first time that I tried to cut inlays was when the Jim's posted the inlay challenge last summer. Once again, I drew up some patterns from clipart and gave it a try. I still have problems with getting the drill holes angled correctly. I also learned that I should not use a hammer to try to get the inlays to fit together properly. What can I say, it was the last piece of the sailboat & it just was not cut correctly. The hammer did the trick, but I ended up breaking the wood. Good thing that a little glue fixes most things


    Also I made the birdhouse because of Jim Mex's comment during the challenge.

    Here are my latest attempt at inlays:
    Attached Files
    Website:
    www.wix.com/tangowooddesign/home-page
    ___________________

  • #2
    Yes hammers will ruin your work quickly. I have tried tapping poplar inlays into cedar and it splits the cedar. I now push it in place... as hard as I can, but do not tap it at all. The way Iget the right angle drilled is: I lay the piece on the tilted saw table and drill streight down with a hand held dremel tool with dill bit in it.
    Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
    "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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    • #3
      Looking good.
      "Still Montana Mike"

      "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
      Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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      • #4
        Jim - Thanks for the tip. I have tried hand drilling the wood on top of my angled table, but I also tried angling the drill. I will try drilling straight. And it nice to know that I wasn't the only one to try the hammer routine
        Website:
        www.wix.com/tangowooddesign/home-page
        ___________________

        Comment


        • #5
          I must admit that in the past, I've used a carving mallet to force a piece in. I've come to realize that it's often better to have the inlay stick up a bit when you cut it. One thing I've noticed is that some woods will swell a bit when the glue is applied. Another thing is when there are many turns in a piece, it's likely that the blade will bend.

          I really like your inlays, my favorite is the birdhouse....

          Like anything, repetition will help to improve your skills...
          You're off to a great start..!!!
          Jim

          The limits of the imagination are imaginary.
          No task is too tedious for Art.
          Rock and Scroll

          My Gallery

          My Website
          Featherwood Woodcrafts

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          • #6
            Hammer, oh, how I have been tempted! Now, if it is raised a little I try to sand flush.
            But I must say you did a good job on them. I don't see the crack in the wood.
            Fran

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            • #7
              I find the best way to get a good fit when doing inlay is to use a new blade for each inlay. This keeps the fit consistent. I think the kerf gets worn off of the blades during just one cut. That makes the fit too tight to fit well. I use these used blades for, other than inlay, cuts.
              Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
              "No PHD, just a DD 214"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JimSawyer View Post
                Another thing is when there are many turns in a piece, it's likely that the blade will bend.

                I really like your inlays, my favorite is the birdhouse....

                Like anything, repetition will help to improve your skills...
                You're off to a great start..!!!
                Thanks Jim
                My favorite is the sailboat just because I miss the warm summer days on the lake.
                Regarding your comment about the "many turns will cause the blade to bend" - I believe that you found the error of my ways. I tied to keep the blade real tight & cut real slow, so that I wouldn't bend the blade. However I was having a bad day & I should have set it aside. I wanted to finish & ran into the issue of the last piece not fitting. Hence the hammer
                Donna
                Website:
                www.wix.com/tangowooddesign/home-page
                ___________________

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Fran1942 View Post
                  Hammer, oh, how I have been tempted! Now, if it is raised a little I try to sand flush.
                  But I must say you did a good job on them. I don't see the crack in the wood.
                  Fran
                  Thanks Fran for a good laugh. I'm glad that you were only tempted to use the Hammer. In the past, I have only been tempted, but I had a bad day at work & the hammer just relieved alittle stress. Of course I had to fix the sailboat. The wood broke right below the large sail. Luckily, I have learned how to fix my errors
                  Website:
                  www.wix.com/tangowooddesign/home-page
                  ___________________

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jim Finn View Post
                    I find the best way to get a good fit when doing inlay is to use a new blade for each inlay. This keeps the fit consistent. I think the kerf gets worn off of the blades during just one cut. That makes the fit too tight to fit well. I use these used blades for, other than inlay, cuts.
                    Thanks Jim for the tip. I was cutting both inlays at the same time & I didn't change the blade. Next time I will try your method.
                    Donna
                    Website:
                    www.wix.com/tangowooddesign/home-page
                    ___________________

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good "ole" hammer. HA I don't do inlays, but, I tried it once. I didn't do it with wood though. I thought if you didn't get it flush, you were to sand it smooth with the other surface. Is that right?
                      PERK

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                      • #12
                        Perk - yes the idea is if it is not flush, then you should sand it smooth. However mine wasn't fitting together enough. I would have had nothing left if I sanded it smooth. Hense the hammer. I should have taken my time & sanded/filed the edges. It should have then fit together enough to sand smooth, but the hammer seemed like a faster method
                        Website:
                        www.wix.com/tangowooddesign/home-page
                        ___________________

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