Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

One-of-a-kind intarsia prep

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • One-of-a-kind intarsia prep

    I was working on an intarsia duck pattern and realized the graphic cleanup is taking longer than the cutting will. Now, if I was going to make many of these or sell/give the pattern to someone, then all the clean-up and detail marking would be important. But, this is a one-time project so I was thinking why don't I just mark major cut lines/levels, print one, and make copies. Might not be pretty but, no one will see patttern but, me.
    So, what does everyone do for the the one-of's? Make full, clean, detail, pattern? Or, mark-up a basic one and make copies?
    Thanks,
    Regis
    An old beginner leaping in.

    Pleased with my new EX-16.

  • #2
    For one off's it is down and dirty. Make the lines as sharp as possible or the parts will not fit after you are done.
    But make copies anyway just in case there will be another.
    Rolf
    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with Rolf. Always keep a copy and make sure you can make the cuts so the parts will fit. Do what works for you. And........have fun!

      Jan

      Comment


      • #4
        Great. Cuz, after about 4 hours converting and cleaning the photo of a duck that is only going to have less than a dozen pieces I could not imaging that method was common for one-of's.
        Now, off to cutting.

        Thanks,
        Regis
        An old beginner leaping in.

        Pleased with my new EX-16.

        Comment


        • #5
          Back when I was doing projects on my bandsaw I soon realized that the better prepared my pattern was the nicer my projects turned out.
          But maybe that's just my "gotta be perfect" trait coming out.
          I want my end results to be as nice as possible.

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree with Catlyn in that I want a detailed pattern to begin with and, who knows,
            when someone else sees the 'ONE OF' project you made, you may just wish you had the
            detailed pattern to work from when they request one for themselves.
            God Bless! Spirithorse

            Comment


            • #7
              I usually trace my patterns using a light table, paper, and pencil. Once I get it on the 8 1/2 x 11 paper, I take it to my local office shop to have it enlarged to the size I need. Further adjustments may be made on the "original" if needed. I save the original pencil drawn pattern, and 1 copy of the enlarged, retouched pattern. Make a photocopy of that and start cutting. Adjustments may also be made as I'm cutting. But since I cut from only 1 copy of the pattern, the adjustments are aren't drawn.

              If I make a "One of a Kind" and sell it as such, then there is no need to have a detailed pattern to make another.
              T
              Theresa

              http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

              http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Catlyn View Post
                Back when I was doing projects on my bandsaw I soon realized that the better prepared my pattern was the nicer my projects turned out.
                But maybe that's just my "gotta be perfect" trait coming out.
                I want my end results to be as nice as possible.
                Detail is absolutely required. ALL cut lines MUST be clear and sharp. My point was taking the time to clean all the background and fur/feathers up to all lines, inside and out. Perfect is in the final product.
                An old beginner leaping in.

                Pleased with my new EX-16.

                Comment


                • #9
                  RegisG, How are you doing with your project? Lance

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Regis - I definitely fall in with the group of apparent sadists who go all out to draw up a perfect detailed pattern whether the project will be a one off or not. I honestly believe that having a really clean fine lined pattern to begin with helps tremendously when cutting.

                    I'm fortunate in that I'm pretty good and fast at drawing a pattern on the PC using vector illustration software and I draw all of my patterns this way which me scaleable keepsakes for future projects or for similar projects with minor design modifications. I also always print mine in red ink because I find it is much easier to cut to a fine red line than a black one.
                    Last edited by jim_mex; 12-02-2011, 07:38 AM.
                    Jim in Mexico

                    Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                    - Albert Einstein

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fireglass View Post
                      RegisG, How are you doing with your project? Lance
                      Well, I cleaned up the pattern anyways and have cut the pieces. Sanding & grinding them down is a different story, slow, slow, slow. I don't want to go and buy anything for sanding and shaping this close to Christmas....

                      Regis
                      Last edited by RegisG; 12-02-2011, 05:40 PM.
                      An old beginner leaping in.

                      Pleased with my new EX-16.

                      Comment

                      Unconfigured Ad Widget

                      Collapse

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      Working...
                      X