Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

could somebody explain how to do inlay?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • could somebody explain how to do inlay?

    I would like to give inlay a try but need some direction. I know there are videos by steve good but I still live in the land of dial up and videos take about three days to load. How do you determine the angle? I read the sticky on determining angle but it got a little confusing. Is the angle cut in toward the pattern or out away from it? Thanks.
    Keith

  • #2
    There were several articles on inlay in past issues, so do a search on that. Or search for threads on inlay. I sent you a PM
    Rolf
    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

    Comment


    • #3
      Here's a link to an angle calc. AngleCalc!
      Don

      Comment


      • #4
        Martzy here is a link to a fine inlay tutorial by one of our resident inlay masters Jim Collins (Jim Sawyer)
        http://www.scrollsawer.com/forum/new...igns/24011.htm
        Gloria ............... Two memorable things to say in life, "Hello" for the first time, and "Good-bye" for the last.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Martzy,
          Jim_Mex and I are working on a nice tutorial designed especially for first timers. it should be ready within about a week.
          If you can be patient, I think you'll like what we've come up with....
          Jim

          The limits of the imagination are imaginary.
          No task is too tedious for Art.
          Rock and Scroll

          My Gallery

          My Website
          Featherwood Woodcrafts

          Comment


          • #6
            Here is how I do inlay.....(I do on average 1-2 a day) I do what is called double bevel inlay. I use for background a piece of Cedar 1/4" thick. I draw the shape of the image on that cedar and tape to the underside of it 1/4" + of other wood, Poplar, pine, mesqiete, or oak ...etc. I tape it in place with 2" wide celophane packing tape. (This helps it to slide easily too.) I tilt my table to 3.7 degrees and cut using a Flying Duchman #5 Polar blade. While cutting I keep the center of the image to the right side of the line. This will allow the bottom wood to come up and fit the upper hole. I glue it in place with white glue and sand flush on both sides. I use a wixey guage to set the angle of the saw bed. If I want the top wood to drop down into the hole , instead of the bottom coming up, I cut with the center of the image to the left of the blade. Practice on some scrap. The key is: always use the same thickess woods. I leave one saw set up to the 3.7 degrees and use it just for inlay. (For the most part)
            Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
            "No PHD, just a DD 214"

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks everyone for helping out a first timer. Looking forward to the tutorial JimSawyer.

              So Jim Finn, both of your woods layered would be a half inch and you use an angle of 3.7 degrees. What if the wood was thicker? I wanted to put an inlay at the bottom of a bowl so both layered pieces of wood would be pretty thick. How do I determine the appropriate angle?
              Keith

              Comment


              • #8
                I can't wait to try inlay...cutting my teeth on intarsia now....one addiction at a time

                Comment


                • #9
                  Martzy - I do a trial and error testing to determine the angle of wood for different thicknesses of wood. It also depends on the blade you are using.

                  So - take some scrap pieces of the wood you will actually be using. I start with 3.5 degree angle. Go from the edge of the wood, and cut a circle in the wood, coming back out the edge you came in on. Doesn't have to be big - just enough so that the top wood can drop down into the bottom wood.
                  Now - check and see if the layers are flush or not. If not, adjust the angle.
                  A tip someone gave that helps me greatley - a zero degree angle the woods will slide right through. So - if the top wood lies above the bottom wood, you need to reduce the angle - make it closer to zero degrees because it needs to go down more.
                  If the wood is too far into the bottom layer, you need to make the angle higher (try 4 degrees) etc.

                  When you are cutting the double bevel, the edges of the wood are like this: \ /
                  When you cut at a zero degree (most scrolling) the edges are like this: | |

                  T
                  Theresa

                  http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                  http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by martzy View Post
                    I wanted to put an inlay at the bottom of a bowl so both layered pieces of wood would be pretty thick. How do I determine the appropriate angle?
                    Martzy -- I use the Excel angle calculator that Tor posted. I've tried to make it into a table. If you know the wood thickness and the blade thickness, you can look up the angle. I always make a test cut or cuts, but this might give you a place to start.

                    Well, I can't seem to get the table in here in a readable form, and the .doc form will not attach. PM me and I can email you the table.
                    Last edited by mtnman; 08-25-2011, 10:47 AM.
                    Mtnman Jim

                    taking life as it comes and trying to make the best of it

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To shed a little light on the angle. The simplest way to get your angle right is to place the piece of wood that will be the top of your stack behind the blade and place the right side of the board, (being sure that the side is square to the top), right up to the blade. adjust your table so that the left side of the blade at the top meets the outside edge of the board, and the right side of the blade at the bottom meets the edge of the board.
                      I'm sure this is clear as mud, but it is correct....
                      Jim

                      The limits of the imagination are imaginary.
                      No task is too tedious for Art.
                      Rock and Scroll

                      My Gallery

                      My Website
                      Featherwood Woodcrafts

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jim - do you have a picture of that?
                        T
                        Theresa

                        http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                        http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jimsawyer
                          To shed a little light on the angle
                          I need a brighter bulb........and I agree with T, pictures.
                          Gloria ............... Two memorable things to say in life, "Hello" for the first time, and "Good-bye" for the last.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I need a brighter bulb
                            Hi Gloria - forget the bulb. I need a brain implant to visualize that one! - and I thought I could understand my pal Jim pretty well.

                            I think on this one someone rippled the pond between our two nations separated by a common language!
                            Jim in Mexico

                            Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                            - Albert Einstein

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ok, I took a couple of photos to help illustrate...
                              ...here in this photo, the red arrow points to the top of the blade. This is where the left side of the blade is even with the edge of the board.
                              The green arrow points to the bottom of the blade. This is where the right side of the blade is even with the the edge of the board.
                              angle pic 01 x02.jpg

                              In this photo, I've pushed the board over so that you can see it better...
                              angle pic 02.jpg

                              Does this help???

                              I only do this when I'm cutting wood thicknesses that I don't cut often, like 3/8" or 1/2".
                              ..And this will generally just get you in the ball park. You'll still need to do a test cut or two...
                              Jim

                              The limits of the imagination are imaginary.
                              No task is too tedious for Art.
                              Rock and Scroll

                              My Gallery

                              My Website
                              Featherwood Woodcrafts

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X