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A little Safety Reminder

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  • A little Safety Reminder

    Hi All,
    Returned from a camping trip over the weekend and decided to knock out some 3-D ornaments. I figured I could save time and use my cross cut sled to rip some short pieces to 1 1/8" squares. On the first piece I cut, the waste caught between the sled and the blade and kicked back and up. Fortunately for me, I saw it about to happen and tried moving out of the way. The piece of wood caught me in the neck about 2" below my jawline but as I was moving out of the way it only grazed me. If I had been half a second later, it would've caught me square in the jugular and I would not be typing this today. I have worked with these tools for most of my life and I know better. It took me about an hour to stop shaking and go back and resaw the stuff the right way.
    So, next time you're in a rush, remember....you can't save time if you get seriously injured or worse!
    Kevin
    Scrollsaw Patterns Online
    Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

  • #2
    The blade on my bandsaw broke while resawing logs, so I decided to finish up with my table saw. I was resawing with the blade all the way up and then I'd have to flip the log to continue resawing because the log was thicker than the blade would raise. I wasn't using my puch sticks and/or fingerboards. I managed to remove a nice chunk of my middle finger along with some of the nail. I learned a lesson that I already knew, but now I have drops of blood all over my shop to remind me. I had to shut down all my equipement before I could go to the hospital, thus all the blood everywhere...and my finger still is tender to this very day because a nerve was damaged at a finger tip. Have to be careful when i do something simple like push the lock on a door, or i feel the owwey.
    Jeff Powell

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    • #3
      Kevin, be more careful. We need more of your nice patterns. You learned a lesson the lucky way. It never pays to get in a rush.
      Mike

      Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
      www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

      Comment


      • #4
        I am glad you were not seriously hurt.

        There is nothing that brings safety to the forefront like a near miss accident.
        The same holds true for driving a car or running any power tool.

        I imagine most of us have had a close call of some kind. Thanks for bringing this to our attention. There is no such a thing as too safe
        CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
        "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
        Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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        • #5
          It's surprising how often this sort of thing happens, despite the risks being well known. Most of us get a second chance, but not not all of us . Whenever I'm using my TS I make a point of standing well to the side of whatever wood I happen to be feeding through and I use push sticks. I know you need to be in control of the wood, but the further I am from it, the safer I feel.

          Gill
          There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
          (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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          • #6
            Ouchies

            I found that I get kickback, poor results, close calls whenever I say to myself, "It's only one quick cut" or get in a hurry.

            I am training myself that whenever I start to think that way to shut everything down and take a break.

            EarlinJax

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            • #7
              And don't try to use the push-stick to move the scrap piece away from the blade.

              I was holding mine with the end against the palm of my hand and tried that.

              The stick caught the blade and kicked back inside my hand: Hurt like a ... well you get my drift.

              I thought i had broken something inside, and found out that you can get a bruise in the palm of the hand.

              Lesson learned: Turn off the saw first and wait for the blade to stop.

              Respectfull of the tools,
              Marcel
              http://marleb.com
              DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

              NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

              Comment


              • #8
                It happens to the best of us..

                I took the top of my thumb off with a table saw...


                I had this hook in my finger for about 6 hours..


                Trout
                Hawk G-4 Jetcraft
                Fish are food, not friends!

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                • #9
                  Thank you, Trout. Now please excuse me while I go and barf...

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                  • #10
                    Trout, those are some photos. I still wish I would have taken a picture of my finger when I shot a 2" brad through it with my air brad nailer. I didn't think it was working quite right so I decided to test it on a piece of scrap wood about 3/4" thick. I probably shouldn't have had my finger on the other side while holding it. I took one look and quickly pulled the nail back out. It amounted to 1 drop of blood on each side of my finger and never once hurt or throbbed. It must have went thru nothing but meat. I did save the small piece of scrap wood with the nail still in it. It will always be a reminder.
                    Mike

                    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      just for the record...

                      I was 16 when I did my thumb and that was 30 years ago...
                      what your seeing here is a 1/2 thumb that worked hard today...

                      my mom said that I could have the speakers out of the console stereo/TV as long as it put something back in there place so that no one would know they were gone...The TV didn't work any more but console was like a show piece in the front living room...
                      the table saw was home made by my great grandfather on a old Singer sewing machine frame. I think before small table saws were even invented..that heirloom went to the dump the following weekend...

                      as for the hook...I was fishing a derby so I had to finish the day and plus I had a 2 hour ride home..I tried to get someone to take it out for me but I couldn't find any takers...

                      if you fill the pictures are to graphic I'll be more than happy to remove them..

                      Trout
                      Hawk G-4 Jetcraft
                      Fish are food, not friends!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't think the pictures are too graphic - we all need reminding from time to time that some tools are dangerous and can cause serious injuries if we don't treat them with proper respect.

                        It's just that ... some pictures paint more than a thousand words.

                        Gill
                        There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                        (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just cuz God gave us 10, it doesnt mean 9 of them are for practicing on. Dale
                          Dale w/ yella saws

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                          • #14
                            I am glad to see this post for like everyone said we all need reminding that any tool with a blade can and will get you if you aint carefull, I had an accident with lawnmower- i no it aint woodworking related but that is one thing everyone has done is mow a yard, while i was mowing i fell backwards and pulled the lawnmower over my foot and guess what it hurt. I lost my big toe couldnt find it no where, it also cut me in the middle of my foot almost cut it off they did save the foot but i only can move the little toe the other 3 are just there for looks, it has been 3 years now and it still hurts it cut all the bones and tendions, the nevers and the blood vesols, i was off work for 4 mounths. so now when i see someone pull one backwards i just want to stop and show them my foot, I was going to post a pic. of it a mounth after it happened but it is still kinda nasty looking so i didnt.
                            bottom line is be carefull when you are around something with blades and just because you have done it for years dont take for granted that you want get hurt. if you think i should post a pic. let me no and i will.
                            Rick

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                            • #15
                              No thanks Rick, I myself can visualize.
                              Marsha
                              LIFE'S SHORT, USE IT WELL

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