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  • Selling Our Carfts...?

    I've recently gotten back into scrolling (used to do alitle bit when i was about ten or so) Im now 19...

    Did a portrait of me and the love of my life (gave it to her for her birthday)

    But I really enjoy making intricate pieces... What would portraits etc. scrolled sell for ?

    And where would be a good place to advertise them?

    Magazines?
    Websites?
    Ebay?
    On forums relating to the portraits? (for example hevy emblems on chevy forums.)

    If you have any advice on what sells and where to sell it (possible price range suggestions) Please Let Me Know (don't need to get rich just make alittle extra cash, doing' an enjoyable hobby...)

    ~Tim Bonner
    'smile it makes people wonder what your up to, and brightens anothers day.'

  • #2
    Personally Tim, I think face to face sales would definitely be the best if not the only way to go. People aren't that impressed unless they can see the actual product up close. They also like to be able to feel it. I believe craft shows would be your best bet. As Christmas get closer, there should be more and more craft shows popping up. If you live in a small community and can find a retail establishment that will display your work, you may be able to sell some this way or pick up custom orders. This is the route I'm going to attempt. Maybe you can find a small restaurant that would love to hang your art on their walls. You still have to sell the idea to the restaurant though. You'll more than likely have to give the location a cut, also.

    Good luck
    Mike

    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

    Comment


    • #3
      unsure on selling, and what works better then face to face selling, followed by word of mouth sales afterwards. The market in your area is yours to test out! give it a shot. Dale
      Dale w/ yella saws

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Minnesota scroller
        Personally Tim, I think face to face sales would definitely be the best if not the only way to go. People aren't that impressed unless they can see the actual product up close. They also like to be able to feel it. I believe craft shows would be your best bet. As Christmas get closer, there should be more and more craft shows popping up. If you live in a small community and can find a retail establishment that will display your work, you may be able to sell some this way or pick up custom orders. This is the route I'm going to attempt. Maybe you can find a small restaurant that would love to hang your art on their walls. You still have to sell the idea to the restaurant though. You'll more than likely have to give the location a cut, also.

        Good luck
        My mentor (girlfriends grandad, mid-as-well be my own grandfather) he turns pens more than anything now (bought a larger scroll saw, and I bought his old one off of him... He is planning on going to craft shows with a variety of the pens hes turning (in 8 or 9 months I suppose) I plan on going along with him then to show some pieces I make... So I'd like to also spend a good bit of time preparing for that (and do a few more larger projects... clocks, the E Tower...)

        just tring to think of ways to advertise (like website, buisness cards etc.) so i can give out info. at craft shows, and also possibly more sales oppertunities, as well as the shows...

        Thanks for the input, keep it coming if you can think of anymore...
        'smile it makes people wonder what your up to, and brightens anothers day.'

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Tim;
          Welcome to the forum.

          I sell my portraits for, 1st one $75 to include making the pattern, any additional $55. (I always stack cut, If they don't want the additional I have a sample to show with the photo.)
          That is an 8X10 cutting matted into a 11X14 matt and in a $5 Wally World wood frame.

          I do all my work as a fund raiser so there are many scroll pattern makers willing to help out if you do not want to make the pattern yourself.

          Wherever you go have at least one cutting with you. Someone will ask "What Dat?" and you are on your way. Wherever I mean, school, shopping, dancing, etc, etc, etc. It should be stuck to you as much as your credit card.


          Put a sticker with your name and address on every piece so people can contact you.

          Best of luck.

          John

          Old Dust

          Comment


          • #6
            advertising. .... business cards are great, a simple flyer with a few pictures is a great idea, as well as noting "custom orders encouraged" . One other thing to try if theres time. Now this is just an idea, but cut out a bunch of simple 3D designs, like the little swans or things of that nature, then on the bottom woodburn your name and number or some contact info for you on there. Hand them out to the ones that look like they are just about to spring for a piece you have for sale. Give a few to the kids that got dragged along with mom and dad to the show too. Dale
            Dale w/ yella saws

            Comment


            • #7
              Tim, I have no idea where John (Old Dust) lives but to get $75 for a portrait is pretty impressive. I've been getting just $20 here in MN. I know I should charge more, and I will be going up pretty soon, but $75? Personally, I think if you start out charging that much you are going to be very disappointed. I think you are better off starting low and then as you get more well known and your projects improve, gradually increase your prices. Less chance of early discouragement. You'll also sell more and this will keep you busier at something you enjoy.
              Mike

              Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
              www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

              Comment


              • #8
                heres my latest scrolling (started it at 8:30am-12:30pm finished it up today 4:30-11pm on and off)

                Im glad I got it all cut out today (gotta finish it later on in the week) I believe its cut outta Ash (forgot to get the folks i bought the wood off of to label the pieces)

                'smile it makes people wonder what your up to, and brightens anothers day.'

                Comment


                • #9
                  The one thing I can suggest is do some of the things that are related to the area your in ,like the wildlife , the scenery , anything thats remotely related to your area and do alot of the smaller things because they will sell alot better than the bigger higher priced ones .

                  And you can put up a website thats basically a picture album and direct people to it and they can see the work youve done and as well contact you from thereby email if they want anything else .

                  Word of mouth is the biggest thing especially when first starting out and like Old Dust said take one of your projects with you to carry all the time so people can see when you talk with them about it

                  and business cards
                  Charlie
                  "Everything Happens for a Reason"
                  Craftsman 18in. 21609

                  http://wolfmooncreations.weebly.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Tim,

                    I believe you will find this discussion in other older threads as well.

                    What you charge is going to depend on many factors:
                    Your location & your clientèle : where is the sale happening, a bazaar? a jewelery store?
                    Your local economy.
                    What it is your selling: The size, the intricacy, the originality, the materials used.
                    And of how you value your time.

                    If you have a day job that you LIKE, do you have the opportunity to do overtime? if so what do you value the loss of doing scroll work as opposed to working overtime? If you hate your job, and wouldn't do overtime unless a gun (or the unemployment line) is pointed at you, then it doesn't matter.

                    Figure out what is the minimum you are willing to make an hour and calculate your time put in. But be careful that you do not include the time it takes you to learn a new technique, or spent on this forum. But don't forget to add overhead: Electricity, patterns,blades, glue, finish, frames, backer material, saw depreciation, booth location (if any) advertising, business cards...

                    Basically: If you're starting a business, learn how to run a business if you want to be successful at it. Otherwise, slap a price you think is about right and hope to sell and just have fun enjoying a hobby.

                    Regards,
                    Marcel
                    http://marleb.com
                    DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                    NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Portraits don't sell well in my area. I don't do them at all. They are not my thing anyway. I think you need a variety of things at all price levels. I have some 3-5 dollar ornaments that the kids can buy for their parents, as well as higher priced items. I have a friend who does portraits exclusively and I believe he sells them for around $40. I am not sure that he always covers his table costs. His work is excellent, and he does some of his own patterns.
                      Rolf
                      RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                      Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                      Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                      And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The price of $75 for the first portrait is for a cutting ordered from a photo. For regular portraits that patterns are easily available I charge $45, matted and
                        framed.

                        Same cuttings in $3 8X10 frames sell for $25.

                        I have some of my work up in restaurants, pet grooming, car wash spa and other places and since I do my work for fund raising only give the location $5 per sold piece reguardless of price.

                        I charge the same at shows so as not to have a conflict in pricing.

                        John

                        Old Dust

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Rolf,
                          I'm surprised to hear that portraits don't do well around you. I'm just up the road in CT and they do pretty well for me here.
                          Marcel covered the pricing scheme pretty well. This is one of the reasons I stack-cut virtually everything (including clocks). It allows me to make a decent return per hour.
                          Kevin
                          Scrollsaw Patterns Online
                          Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Selling

                            If you are thinking about ebay you may want to check this listing out. Scrollwork doesn't seem to bring much even though it was an excellent piece of work. I saw it in Branson.
                            http://cgi.ebay.com/Victorian-Bridge...QQcmdZViewItem
                            Rick Hutcheson
                            http://www.scrollsaws.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I based that comment on the information from my club member who sells at some of the local craft shows.

                              I should say people portraits don't sell well. I may do a few dogs.
                              I suspect they may sell, I will do them as ornaments.
                              Rolf
                              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                              Comment

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