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  • #16
    Looks good Randy. A very nice piece.

    I looked at magnetic polisher and they can be expensive. I hope you can make it a profitable venture.

    Karl

    P.S. I have to ask this question from your site. When showing the reduction rates for different coins, below it you state: Not the coins you are looking for?

    Is that a reference to Star Wars: A New Hope when Obi Wan says: These are not the droids you are looking for. It may just be coincidence, but the way you wrote it reminded me of the movie.
    Last edited by KarlB; 04-15-2018, 06:18 PM.
    Karl in Sunny Southwest Florida

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    • #17
      The pin polisher intrigued me so I went looking to find out exactly what it was and curiously enough the idea of having fine abrasive embedded into silicone or hard rubber is something I've come across in my ceramic manufacturing background, albeit on a much large scale.

      Polishing the feet of fired cups or plates to make them very smooth is often carried out on revolving turntables with a head made of rubber impregnated with abrasive.

      Thinking of this threw me on to another technique which might be worth trying which again is similar to much larger equipment used in both ceramic tableware manufacturing and stone tile polishing

      Take the idea of a revolving drum gemstone polisher for creating jewelry baubles and instead of using a water and sand mixture as the polishing medium try just very fine sand or if you can get hold of some, fine silicon carbide. I would think that revolving coins around in this mixture at relatively slow speeds would do the trick of removing any burrs without causing damage.

      Just my 50c coin idea...
      Last edited by jim_mex; 04-15-2018, 09:08 PM.
      Jim in Mexico

      Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
      - Albert Einstein

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      • #18
        Originally posted by KarlB View Post
        Is that a reference to Star Wars: A New Hope when Obi Wan says: These are not the droids you are looking for. It may just be coincidence, but the way you wrote it reminded me of the movie.
        . I love that perspective, and wish I had done it on purpose :-)


        "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
        website: http://www.coincutting.com

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        • #19
          Originally posted by jim_mex View Post
          Take the idea of a revolving drum gemstone polisher for creating jewelry baubles and instead of using a water and sand mixture as the polishing medium try just very fine sand or if you can get hold of some, fine silicon carbide. I would think that revolving coins around in this mixture at relatively slow speeds would do the trick of removing any burrs without causing damage.

          Just my 50c coin idea...
          Interesting Idea . . . now if I can just find my tumbler :-)

          Last edited by hotshot; 04-16-2018, 10:39 PM.
          "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
          website: http://www.coincutting.com

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          • #20
            It will be interesting to see how this works out for you.
            Rolf
            RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
            Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
            Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
            And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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            • #21
              Well, got the pin polisher and it is pretty neat. I worked up to a few pieces with detail, then finally put this piece in that had just a few highly detailed pieces. I polished right up, but did not damage with fragile pieces.

              ------Randy

              Pin_Polisher_Test.jpg
              "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
              website: http://www.coincutting.com

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              • #22
                That's interesting Randy.

                How did it do with the burrs?
                Were they all eliminated?
                Were the edges of the cuts smoothed?
                Did you lose any detail from face or edges of the coin?

                Thanks,
                Karl
                Karl in Sunny Southwest Florida

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by jim_mex View Post
                  The pin polisher intrigued me so I went looking to find out exactly what it was and curiously enough the idea of having fine abrasive embedded into silicone or hard rubber is something I've come across in my ceramic manufacturing background, albeit on a much large scale.

                  Polishing the feet of fired cups or plates to make them very smooth is often carried out on revolving turntables with a head made of rubber impregnated with abrasive.

                  Thinking of this threw me on to another technique which might be worth trying which again is similar to much larger equipment used in both ceramic tableware manufacturing and stone tile polishing

                  Take the idea of a revolving drum gemstone polisher for creating jewelry baubles and instead of using a water and sand mixture as the polishing medium try just very fine sand or if you can get hold of some, fine silicon carbide. I would think that revolving coins around in this mixture at relatively slow speeds would do the trick of removing any burrs without causing damage.

                  Just my 50c coin idea...
                  Actually, a lot of people who make their own silver jewelry pieces with silver clay do this with a rock tumbler already. Just the inexpensive kind you can get at harbor freight works. They use stainless steel shot usually in them but I think there are other things some use (its been a long while since I explored all this so would have to go back and do some to get more info. Just let me know if anyone wants more detail on it.)

                  You can see some examples here from a jewelry supplier that I have used in the past while making jewelry pieces from silver clay. Many of those pieces can be pretty fragile looking but work well in this tumbler. I bought the tumbler from harbor freight for 1/2 that price I believe because many said they used it. I had never thought about it or would have previously thrown that out for your info. Randy.

                  https://www.cooltools.us/searchresul...&Submit=Search

                  https://www.cooltools.us/Stainless-S...-p/brn-402.htm (has a video at this link showing how it works)

                  https://www.harborfreight.com/catalo...%2Cf&q=tumbler

                  The metal clay is something Randy that would allow you to create your own sized "Coins" to work with. Especially if in some instances you wanted bigger than you can get with a regular coin. I don't know how that would compare for you price wise though. I have thought about throwing that out for you before in case you were unaware of the "sliver clay" that you can use to create your own pieces with. There is lots of information available about working with silver clay online for anyone interested.

                  Melanie from East TN

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                  • #24
                    My $$ are on Randy in any throw down.
                    Doug

                    Take what you do seriously
                    Never take yourself too seriously

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by meflick View Post

                      .... "sliver clay" ......
                      Yep, heard of it and we have someone in our craftstore that does various pieces with this medium. Pretty neat . . . expensive. . . but neat.

                      I looked into playing with this a little, not necessarily for coins, but just as another craft type. I hope to circle back around to play with it, but my plate is full right now. I'm into neck deep into electroforming/plating/copper etching, glass fusing, enameling, and I would like to add engraving at some point. Too much to learn, so little time.

                      -----Randy
                      "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
                      website: http://www.coincutting.com

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by hotshot View Post

                        Yep, heard of it and we have someone in our craftstore that does various pieces with this medium. Pretty neat . . . expensive. . . but neat.

                        I looked into playing with this a little, not necessarily for coins, but just as another craft type. I hope to circle back around to play with it, but my plate is full right now. I'm into neck deep into electroforming/plating/copper etching, glass fusing, enameling, and I would like to add engraving at some point. Too much to learn, so little time.

                        -----Randy
                        Oh, I feel your pain Randy. so much to try and learn and so little time. I have done many other crafting type things over the years. Still have most of the equipment and supplies. I am presently exploring cloning so I can have the me who does scrolling, the me who does pyrography, the me who does the silver clay work, the me who does the glass beads, the me who does the vinyl work, the me who does the paper crafts work, colored pencils, comic markers, and so on and so on. I figure the only me I don't need is the one who cooks regularly or keeps an immaculate house. After all these years of NOT having that, I wouldn't want to give my husband a heart attack. The good news is that I still haven't invested as much in my toys errr tools as that boat we have out back so all's good. (Plus he's the one who taught me if you want to do a job right, you need to get the right tools. Bonus is he's a hobby woodworker so a lot of the workshop tools are his. I just use them.)



                        Melanie from East TN

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                        • #27
                          Lots of great information from all of you! Melanie the link to Cool tools proved very interesting especially the bit about work hardening the rings.
                          I also agree so much to do and learn so little time!
                          Rolf
                          RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                          Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                          Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                          And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                          • #28
                            You could also use a vibrator for polish and removing burs. The type they use for cleaning and polishing shell casings reloading ammo.
                            Something Profound

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Wild Bill View Post
                              You could also use a vibrator for polish and removing burs. The type they use for cleaning and polishing shell casings reloading ammo.
                              Indeed, Harbor Freight has them, and a lot of other Jewelers makers either use the vibrating or a regular tumbler as they are pretty reasonably priced, especially at harbor freight. I inherited a drum tumbler, so may dig that out some time and give that shot (how is that for a pun?).
                              "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
                              website: http://www.coincutting.com

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