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Using Jewelers Blades in 16" King/Excalibur/Excelsior

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  • Using Jewelers Blades in 16" King/Excalibur/Excelsior

    When I got my King, and got all setup at the shop, clamped down, blades layer out, 6+ reading glasses balanced on my nose . . . . when I went to tension the blade, I knew by feel, the tension was way too high, and pop, blade broke before tension was near full. The normal way of loading and tensioning the blades was never going to work.

    The shorter arm on the 16" makes a lot of difference in leverage. So, my Jeweler friends have woken up to the fact that a scroll saw can possibly replace their Jewelers saws, and a lot of them are looking for a saw, and I've been recommending the 16" which fits their project types perfectly (and is cheaper). So of course, we don't want folks messing with that back knob, but the answer was pretty simple, but hard to explain so I did a video. I which I had a "Presenters" type voice, but unfortunately, all I have in mine. Anyway, here is the short video demonstration geared to my Jeweler friends:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpvnN9bXw58
    Last edited by hotshot; 03-11-2018, 09:55 PM.
    "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
    website: http://www.coincutting.com

  • #2
    I just had a thought watching your video, very clear by the way. How would moving the tensioning cam part of the way before tightening the lower clamp work?
    Rolf
    RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Rolf View Post
      I just had a thought watching your video, very clear by the way. How would moving the tensioning cam part of the way before tightening the lower clamp work?
      That was my first thought, but it doesn’t stay in the correct position without being held. Under the table, it takes one hand to hold the blade, and the other to tighten it.

      if the tension lever had a “flat” at mid range to tighten it, I think that approach might work. I have an extra lever, I’m tempted to try that modification.
      "Ever Striving, Never Arriving"
      website: http://www.coincutting.com

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      • #4
        Enjoyed your video. Seems to me to be a very simple solution and would quickly become second nature when using those blades.
        AKA Paul from Washington State

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