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Ukulee work in progress

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  • #16
    Hobbyhorse
    I had the privilege of going to a local privately owned BMW museum.
    http://tbrnewsmedia.com/museum-like-...w-motorcycles/

    This video shows the only one of these BMW left, I am not sure if he restored it for BMW or if he owns it. I think it may be the first. This is the owner of the museum.
    http://tbrnewsmedia.com/museum-like-...w-motorcycles/

    The museum is by appointment only. I went with a local Triumph sports car club.
    Rolf
    RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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    • #17
      That is a stunning display Rolf ... a 1969 BMW R60/2 is not a model I have seen before.

      Thanks for the link.

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      • #18
        He had several BMW that were the only one left or extremely rare. He Had one, and I don't remember the model, that he asked us not to photograph as was waiting for a special reveal with BMW. Supposedly it didn't exist anymore.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

        Comment


        • #19
          A little more progress, but really very slow .... the weather has been good for riding and I have been making the most of it.

          I have been able to install the "rosette" which is made of the African wood Wenge but it was a real learning experience learning how to go about it. I made up a circle cutter with a trimmer mounted on some MDF and with a 1/4" piece of brass rod to act as a fulcrum point which is adjustable for differing diameters. The uke top is 2mm and the rosette was set in 1mm and the rebate was cut using a downcut 1/8th router bit. The bending of the circle of wenge did cause me some trouble but I finally worked out the technique required at which point things became much easier. I tried steaming it but could not get sufficient heat into it and finally used a holesaw of the correct size which was heated with a blow torch and the wooden strip was bent around it. The secret was in the amount of heat applied, too much and the wood chars, too little and it is not fexible enough.

          Today I glued the top down using Titebond II, which is such a nice glue to use ... tomorrow I will begin cleaning up the edge joint before tackling the neck. The back will go on last.
          Last edited by Hobbyhorse; 03-20-2018, 03:30 AM.

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          • #20
            Three more photos.

            I should point out that the joint in the top of the rosette is covered by the end of the neck and finger board.
            Last edited by Hobbyhorse; 03-17-2018, 08:13 PM.

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            • #21
              This is an interesting build and I appreciate you showing us how you do it. While I will never build one, your build is very good.

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              • #22
                Hi Rhys - well having talked a lot about this project between the two of us I thought I better look in at your post and see what was going on.

                I didn't expect anything less than professionalism my friend and your post to date hasn't disappointed. This is going to be a beautiful instrument, however, in my eyes your Maloof Rocker still commands the Woodworker´s Guild Premium Award .

                I look forward to seeing this finished project - and maybe a small video showing you strumming it?

                I also noted the steamer - neat and also handy for a preparing a nice mug of tea during projects

                Good on ya mate!
                Jim in Mexico

                Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                - Albert Einstein

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                • #23
                  Hi Rolf - the link to the BMW museum brought back a nice memory for me. Tucked in between the bikes is a 3 wheel ' bubble car'. I am not sure if this is a BMW original but it reminded me of my first covered transport after a string of British bikes which was an Isetta with 375 cc BMW motor. I well remember taking it for the first spin on a quiet Sunday morning driving down the main street of my town like a demented bumblebee. That front two front wheel steering was so positive it really took practice to get it to go in a straight line! Wow, memory lane!

                  Coincidentally here in my home town in Mexico I spotted an identical one to mine a while back in really nice condition at the back of a local mechanical repair shop. The owner had bought it on a whim many years back and decided to keep it. I've asked him a couple of times if he'd be interested in selling it but he's always refused. It would certainly be fun to drive one again but I definitely prefer my BMW with two wheels!

                  Jim in Mexico

                  Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                  - Albert Einstein

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                  • #24
                    Finally something to show .... I now have to figure out how to play it.

                    The back and sides are of 10,000 year old swamp Kauri while the top and neck are of recycled Kauri. I was fortunate to have the material in the shop and even more fortunately it was all vertical grained timber. The black wood in the fret board, rosette and bridge is Wenge. It is finished with three light coats of 30% gloss lacquer.

                    Just as an aside: the scrollsaw did get a lot of use in this project.
                    Last edited by Hobbyhorse; 04-28-2018, 01:59 AM.

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                    • #25
                      What a great looking project you have crafted. It looks very nice. It looks like you took a lot of time and effort to craft it and it was time well spent. Let us know how the lessons in playing it goes. Thanks for sharing,
                      Melanie from East TN

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                      • #26
                        Cutaway Ukulele.jpg

                        And another one.

                        I was intrigued by what it might take to bend the right side for the cutaway and indeed it was a learning experience. The left side bent up reasonably easily after steaming it as last time, but the sharp bend to the right had to be bent over a 1" diameter galvanised pipe which was heated with a heatgun and the timber kept wet to create the steam. The second bend against the neck was bent over a 2" diameter piece of pipe and in a similar fashion.

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                        • #27
                          How thick was the wood?
                          Rolf
                          RBI G4 Hawk, Delta SS350, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                          Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                          Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                          And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                          • #28
                            I can't imagine all the work that went into that beautiful instrument.
                            Denny
                            ArtCrafters in Dayton, TN

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                            • #29
                              Rolf, the sides are 2mm thick and are vertical grain.

                              Denny thanks for your comments and yes, there are quite a few hours in the ukulele.When I was working full time in the workshop time was a scarce commodity, but now that I am retired and it is a hobby workshop I have the luxury of time with no pressure.
                              Last edited by Hobbyhorse; 06-14-2018, 04:14 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Instruments are something few people attempt. Very nice!
                                Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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