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  • #16
    I stopped using tape all together. I dab some hot glue on the edges to hold it aligned them add a few small nails in waste areas. I did not like packing tap over the pattern, it would allow dust to get under it in areas and make it difficult to see the pattern. The blue painters tape always worried me that it would take fragile pieces with it when removed. I'm not convinced tape lubricates the blade but if it does the spray glue I stick my pattern to the wood with must do the same. I have no burning. I use mostly Baltic Birch, maybe that is why, but my current project is some rosewood and mahogany and no burning so far.

    Anyway that is my current process, I am flexible.
    AKA Paul from Washington State

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    • #17
      Scrappile,

      Tape has a release agent on the non-stickie side to keep it from sticking to itself, otherwise we wouldn't be able to unroll it. This same agent provides the lubrication we get when scroll cutting.

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      • #18
        I don't like packing tape on top either, I always seem to get sawdust under the tape and it blures my lines.
        Tom,
        I was a skeptic so I did a test on Cherry, a prime burning culprit, one with and one without blue tape. There was a significant difference for the better with the tape.
        The belief is that the coating they put on the tape to keep it from sticking to itself is what helps.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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        • #19
          Well I have a project in the future I planed on using cherry. I will test it out. I also use spiral blades for the most part, I'm wondering if they do not cause burning as easily(?).
          Last edited by Scrappile; 03-12-2015, 08:36 PM.
          AKA Paul from Washington State

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          • #20
            I would think that spirals will burn less because they have no flat surfaces. But pitch pockets may still give occasional problem.
            Rolf
            RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
            Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
            Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
            And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

            Comment


            • #21
              You can use double sided tape. I have tried wrapping blue painters all the way around. But have used a brad nailer but the brad nails tend to blow out parts of the wood. I now use a pin nailer its very tiny small pins, if the go through get a pair of side cutters or dikes as they are called and nip the pins off, then I use a small metal file and file down the nails even with the wood. I also put the pattern on first on the top, to use this as a guide to pin nail in the waste areas.

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              • #22
                I Pin nail it on an anvil, like the ones on the back of most vises. I then take a small hammer, again on the anvil and hit each pin. It takes a few seconds. No cutters or filing.
                One other thing I do is after drilling all of my entry holes I sand the back of the stack so that it is smooth and flat, that also takes any remaining pin protrusion off. I use my Sandflee but a RO would be fine. Obviously that wont work if you wrap completely with tape.
                Rolf
                RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Rolf View Post
                  I don't like packing tape on top either, I always seem to get sawdust under the tape and it blures my lines.
                  Tom,
                  I was a skeptic so I did a test on Cherry, a prime burning culprit, one with and one without blue tape. There was a significant difference for the better with the tape.
                  The belief is that the coating they put on the tape to keep it from sticking to itself is what helps.
                  Thanks for the test and results, I will try out the blue painters tape next stack cut I make.

                  Tom
                  Hawk G4
                  http://www.scrollsawer.com/gallery/s...00/ppuser/4243

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                  • #24
                    Wrap the stack in clear packing tape. Spray back of pattern with glue. Allow to be tacky. Apply and cut. Easy and fun. Other ways mentioned also work good. I'm stuck doing it that way. Blue tape removes a little easier but also a little more expensive. Try them all you'll decide what works best for you.
                    Show your work later
                    Have fun. Happy scrolling

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                    • #25
                      I got a pack of 100 of those full sheet shipping labels for 21 bucks off amazon. Which if I figured it out right comes out to about 21 cents a sheet, if just want to try them can get a pack of think 10 at walmart for 4 bucks.

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                      • #26
                        Print the pattern Backwards glue tto the top board brad nail in spaces that are waste but out the top pattern beings it is backwards dosen t tale for much clean up. I stack cut a lot bb 1/8 in lots of 4-5 paper ( card stock or poster board) in lots 0f 25 wiith two 1/8 cover sheets

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                        • #27
                          Initially I was using the full page Avery Labels. I found them to be expensive and a challenge to remove from any delicate fret work. I now us the Xyron 900 with the repositionable product. The patterns are much easier to apply ( no wrinkles) and they stay attached and for the most part they are easy to remove.
                          cwmagee
                          aka Fibber
                          Producer of fancy firewood​

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                          • #28
                            I have tried most of the ways mentioned above, but, always come back to the blue painters tape. I don't wrap the entire stack, just the top and enough around left and right edge to hold and then I use short short strips on top and bottom edges. Then glue the pattern to blue tape. I drill a pilot hole at the edge of the pattern for my last cut, so the stack will stay together.

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                            • #29
                              See my post under wood and materials, double sided tape.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by cwmagee View Post
                                Initially I was using the full page Avery Labels. I found them to be expensive and a challenge to remove from any delicate fret work. I now us the Xyron 900 with the repositionable product. The patterns are much easier to apply ( no wrinkles) and they stay attached and for the most part they are easy to remove.
                                I use a old hair dryer on low heat and the shipping labels peel right off when heated up it releases the sticky, If going to the store to buy them they kind kigh but I bought a pack of 100 of amazon for 22 bucks.

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