Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Puzzle Piece Count

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Puzzle Piece Count

    Anyone have any thoughts on the number of puzzle pieces for youngsters (by age group)? I've got some 1/4" 5 ply wood and 3/0 skip tooth Olson blades on order. My first puzzle attempt will be a blue frog for my neighbors 5 year old.

    Why a blue frog? Well, James (that's the child) told us never to pick one up 'cuz their poisonous. Days later he brought me a frog book with, you guessed it, a blue frog picture. He had to show us he wasn't making it up!

    I don't want to make it too hard, nor too easy for him. He's smart and I can't have him showing me up again!
    Mike

    Craftsman 16" VS, Puros Indios and Sam Adams!
    Scrollin' since Jun/2006

    My Gallery

    http://scrollcrafters.com (reciprocal links welcomed)

  • #2
    hmm make it a 500 piece puzzle! That'll show him! I would say piece count should also coincide with puzzle size. I would think 25 pieces would be a good challenge. Dale
    Dale w/ yella saws

    Comment


    • #3
      This one would keep him busy - http://chrisandnaomi.hathawayhome.ne...jigsaw_puzzle/
      Ian

      Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

      Comment


      • #4
        Ian

        Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree with the 25 pieces, and don't show him/her what the picture should look like either. I have a 5 year old and she can handle that.

          I suggest the puzzle be thick, like at least 1/2 inch. Them 5 year olds will break the pins off 1/4 inch puzzles, trust me they will. my daughter has put her puzzle i made for her together 20 times or more, and she has also chewed it, punched it, kicked it, mashed it into a container, you name it..anything short of pouring ketchup on it...that may still be yet to come !

          I have to make her another one, because she has removed alot of the pins and lost them, so next time I'll go 1/2 inch thick...perhaps I'll go with 1/2 thick steel ?
          Jeff Powell

          Comment


          • #6
            A lot of it depends on the child. I still remember my first puzzles. They were framed puzzles with the shape of the pieces stamped in the backer board. I remember putting them together countless times. Then I graduated to more complex puzzles. I think it is important to keep the child interested and challenged, but not so complex that they become frustrated and then they give up.
            Bill

            I have an RBI Hawk 220-3 VS

            Visit my Gallery
            and website www.billswoodntreasures.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Mike, of my grandchildren, one isn't good with puzzles, one is great but doesn't care about them and another was putting together 12-piece puzzles at age 2. Who knows? For a five-year-old, around 20 pieces should be fine. 1/4" wood in fine also. It helps them learn the concept of flat jigsaw puzzles. They'll take care of them better than you think.

              Here is a children's puzzle of about 35 pieces. Note that it has images within the picture that lend themselves to being cut as puzzle pieces. I'll post picture of both the front and the back. The overall size is about a square foot.

              Have phun.....Carter



              Comment


              • #8
                Mike D.

                3/0 blade will be too small of a kerf for any child under 8 years. It has to do with the accuracy of placing the piece just-so to fit in with the rest of the pieces.

                I cannot find the reference among my books but Patrick Spielman I am sure wrote in one of his books that #3 was the smallest kerf for young children, but a #5 was best. (I think it has something to do with the development of the fine coordination of the muscles in the finger tips. I hope someone with knowledge of child development will chime in.)

                3/0 blade would be a good choice for Teenagers and Adults since the accuracy of exact fitting adds to the challenge.

                But just be very accurate in making the table 90 degrees to the blade if you do use a 3/0 blade or even a 2/0 for puzzles. I have been there and made a puzzle that could only be put together by sliding the pieces in from the back.

                Just IMHO

                Phil

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by GrayBeard Phil
                  I cannot find the reference among my books but Patrick Spielman I am sure wrote in one of his books that #3 was the smallest kerf for young children, but a #5 was best. (I think it has something to do with the development of the fine coordination of the muscles in the finger tips. I hope someone with knowledge of child development will chime in.)

                  Phil

                  I questioned Ben Fink at bensscrollsaw.com, where I get some of my blades from, about this and he also said most people use #5 blades for small children's puzzles. I tried them in a couple simple 3 piece 3/4" puzzles and they worked good.
                  Mike

                  Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                  www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Mike -- I made a few of the animal puzzles in SSW mags just for the sake of sawing- I put them on a shelf in baggies and when my grandaughter saw them when I was throwing out scrap wood she got all excited and wanted to do one. the first one she picked up was of the family of owls in a tree- not an easy puzzle for even grown-ups. but she put it together and wanted more.I was thankful that I had all the puzzles in baggies when they were in the shop and I just tossed bags and all in the burn pile. So we retrieved all of the puzzles and she happly put them all together with joy.She was 6 then and she now thinks I have to make every puzzle that I come across. She doesn't care for jigsaw puzzles but loves the ones out of wood. Go figure what makes a child think the way they do but you have to love em just the same.
                    Sharon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the input. Sharon, thanks for that tip (in another post) on spirals (sticky side down). Did not even think of that.
                      Mike

                      Craftsman 16" VS, Puros Indios and Sam Adams!
                      Scrollin' since Jun/2006

                      My Gallery

                      http://scrollcrafters.com (reciprocal links welcomed)

                      Comment

                      Unconfigured Ad Widget

                      Collapse

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      Working...
                      X