Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What am I missing?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What am I missing?

    For the spiral blade users I have a question. Some of the cuttings I have done especially the patterns by Jeff Zaffino, some of the cut lines are so close to each other that when I cut them with a 2/0 flat blade there is just a sliver of wood. How can you cut these lines with a spiral blade which has a much wider kerf than a flat blade and not blow through to the line next to it?
    Just curious.
    Mick, - Delta P-20

    A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mick Walker
    For the spiral blade users I have a question. Some of the cuttings I have done especially the patterns by Jeff Zaffino, some of the cut lines are so close to each other that when I cut them with a 2/0 flat blade there is just a sliver of wood. How can you cut these lines with a spiral blade which has a much wider kerf than a flat blade and not blow through to the line next to it?
    Just curious.
    Mick, this is an excellent question, and one I've been meaning to ask. I would also like to know how spiral blade users do veining with a spiral blade. I thought veining was delicate thin lines cut into a project to give definition. I could never do veining with the spiral blade I was practicing with on Sat, the kerf was far too wide for veining.
    Marsha
    LIFE'S SHORT, USE IT WELL

    Comment


    • #3
      Mick, the honest answer is that I myself simply adjust the orginal pattern a little bit. Prior to getting into the cutting phase I always look at the pattern and identify areas of concern. From there I simply adjust a line as to give myself the minimum amount of clearance needed. I just posted a Moose in the Gallery and it did get real tight on the forehead area, I pulled it off with adjustments and completed the entire thing with FD-NS 2/0s.

      Marsha, you are correct that spirals do not vein very well. However that depends on the size of the project and what you are veining. I did a wolf pattern designed by Charles Dearing and it had a fair amount of veining. But because of the size of the pattern I was able to effectively complete it without the finished project looking "off".

      When it comes to extensive veining I think there is only one best answer and that is the use of a flat blade (which I have no control of but am working on to improve).

      That's my 2 cents...
      Todd

      Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

      Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

      Comment


      • #4
        Maybe you need to be really good at hiding mistakes by making the occasional pattern alteration?
        Jeff Powell

        Comment


        • #5
          practice, practice, practice, and luck. Dale
          Dale w/ yella saws

          Comment


          • #6
            I have always used only spirals. 1- No law says you have to stay on the lines 2- When the pattern is made, if you're like me and don't have the talent to make it like it has to be before going to get printed, then they have to outline my patterns. Sometimes that outline will crowd the lines, but, just know you do not have to do things exactly as they appear. It doesn't mean you aren't good enough. As far as veining, well I like to do work that you don't have to be right in front of to see detail so the wide kerf works for me. Also, I like to do pics relatively large so proportionately the veining works.

            Comment


            • #7
              I normally try to stay dead on the line and use flat blades. Except for close cuts like you are talking about. In that case, I cut just outside or inside of the line to leave as big a sliver as possible. The pattern dictates how I cut and I don't know how well my technique would work for spirals.
              Mike

              Craftsman 16" VS, Puros Indios and Sam Adams!
              Scrollin' since Jun/2006

              My Gallery

              http://scrollcrafters.com (reciprocal links welcomed)

              Comment


              • #8
                I guess after scrolling for 14 years with flat blades I will stick to what works best for me.
                Mick, - Delta P-20

                A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I love to scroll with spirals and when I have lines close together I try to give enough room for a little wood inbetween lol- I tend to change blade sizes to fit the need and I usually use a #2/0 on the small stuff and up to a # 5 - veining is also easier for me with spirals. I try to say inside of the lines when using spirals and on the line when usinf flat- on veining I am on the line. I go slower speed when I want to be accurate and on vein==I hold the tight fragile inplace with scotch tape to givestabilty to the neighboring peices.
                  Sharon

                  Comment

                  Unconfigured Ad Widget

                  Collapse

                  Latest Topics

                  Collapse

                  • will8989
                    Reply to Farmers market "survey"
                    by will8989
                    The one I do is under a pavilion on County Property, about 60 spaces. They run 4 ‚Äúseasons‚ÄĚ, spring 6 weeks, summer May - mid September, fall sept to Mid November, and holiday fare Mid November until end of year. Cost is $75 per season, per day as they are open Saturday and Sunday. If you are called...
                    Yesterday, 11:10 PM
                  • will8989
                    Reply to Farmers market
                    by will8989
                    Ours are run by the state Ag Dept. They have very strict rules as to masks and distancing. The Ag Dept does come and visit to make sure rules are being followed. We stand behind the table and use the tailgate for packaging. I have people place their credit card in the reader on my phone and remove...
                    Yesterday, 10:31 PM
                  • tgiro01
                    Reply to I admit it... I splurged on a new "toy"
                    by tgiro01
                    Linda - Here is my gimmick for the Incra 1000SE on my SS CNS. I scratched a line 3/4-inch in from the blade end of the fence. I then use a ruler to set that line 1-inch from the side of a carbide tooth on the blade. Then I line the 1-inch mark on the fence ruler to the scratch line.

                    Now,...
                    Yesterday, 09:38 PM
                  • Linda In Phoenix
                    Reply to I admit it... I splurged on a new "toy"
                    by Linda In Phoenix
                    It was a tough choice on the miter gauges---based on recommendations here. I researched the Kreg and the Incra. They were pretty much tied. I let fate decide it. Went into my nearest 2 hardwood stores. #1 sold Kreg, but they were out of stock and didn't know when an order would come in that...
                    Yesterday, 06:47 PM
                  • Linda In Phoenix
                    Reply to Plastic puzzle
                    by Linda In Phoenix
                    Nice puzzle. Go for the gusto---scroll it next time!! Several of the quality brands of blades make blades just for acrylics. With a sharp blade and the right speed it's all good.
                    Yesterday, 06:38 PM
                  Working...
                  X