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Another idea shot to hell

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  • Another idea shot to hell

    The next thing I was going to attempt was coasters. I had some neat patterns in mind and scrolled one yesterday of a wolf head. I cut it out of 1/4" maple and affixed it to a black plexiglass backer. Once I figured out how to best finish them, I was going to be in business - so I thought. As I was studying my wolf head, the question came to mind. How in the world would you clean out the narrow frets if pop, beer or coffee dripped into them?
    Mike

    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

  • #2
    Leave the frets open, but fill the entire thing in with clear epoxy! Then there are no holes for the stuff to drip into!

    Bob
    www.GrobetUSA.com

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    • #3
      You were quick with that one, Bob. Would you just cover the whole coaster with the epoxy and then squeegee it over the top to level it out and remove any excess? What would that do to the finish on the wood?
      Mike

      Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
      www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd actually use the two-part epoxy for the finish (a thin coat of course). That would be very durable (shellacs and lacquers have a habit of breaking down under alcohol or water), and it would be tough to finish after applying. I'd do an oil finish of some sort first, then the epoxy.

        Another option would be to fill the frets with a different colored sawdust mixed with glue for a contrast...just brainstorming...

        I've been editing for the past too days, and the DIY/problem solver in me is gnashing it's teeth to get out!!!

        Bob
        www.GrobetUSA.com

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        • #5
          Bob, any recommendations for the type or brand of 2 part epoxy?

          Thanks much for the advice. However, I'm not crazy about option 2.
          Mike

          Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
          www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BobD
            I've been editing for the past too days
            For how many days, Bob? Definitely time you took a break !

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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            • #7
              I don't need to be able to type to edit <GRIN>

              BOb
              www.GrobetUSA.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Mike

                The project might lose its commercial viability if you have to take a lot of trouble over finishing. How about stack cutting with a softer contrasting wood and creating an inlay? Or could you even make the coasters using relief cuts?

                Gill
                There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've never dripped into anything ("... if pop, beer, or coffee dripped into them?")... don't care what you've heard...
                  PoP
                  Pop
                  Delta 16" 40-530
                  Ryobi 16" VS

                  "Never be afraid to try something new. Remember it was amateurs that built the ARK but Professionals that built the Titanic!"

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                  • #10
                    Gill, I was thinking the same thing. Coasters aren't that expensive. However, when you start talking inlays and relief cuts, you lose me. Remember, I'm just a simple scroller.
                    Mike

                    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have to agree with bobs idea, it makes the most sense. I wonder if auto body filler would work. pack it in, let it dry, then take the belt sander to it, apply your finish. Body filler might be a bit cheaper than the epoxy.

                      Ever consider making compact mirrors??? you need to tap the female market. I was just looking at the new woodworker supply catalogue, they have some pretty tiny pin/dowel hinges in there. You can have the mirrors custom cut locally, wherever you are, it's pretty cheap and fast..just silly cone them in. make a little felt pad to put inside it for a blush pad and a blush brush to sit on. it's simple and it's elegant.
                      Jeff Powell

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Pop
                        I've never dripped into anything ("... if pop, beer, or coffee dripped into them?")... don't care what you've heard...
                        PoP
                        ROTFL
                        Ian

                        Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I saw a project in one of the magazines I get that is exactly what you are trying to do. I believe they used a product called Envirotex (sp?) or something like that. Basically it's a clear, thick finish like is used on bar tops & such.

                          Try a google search on Envirotex and see if that is what you are looking for.
                          Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                          • #14
                            How about just putting the fret side under lexan (or similar transparent material or glass) and maybe sort of have a little frame as the coaster edges holding it all together.

                            Doesn't have to be thick and could be changed when scratched, and would protect the fretwork.

                            Regards,
                            Marcel
                            http://marleb.com
                            DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                            NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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                            • #15
                              Jeff.
                              What a great idea this was.

                              Ever consider making compact mirrors??? you need to tap the female market
                              because as a scroller/turner I look at ideas like that from a couple different perspectives. Now a ladies compact with a mirror in it made with the same wood as the perfume applicators that are commonly turned on a lathe would make a nice little gift package.
                              I am going to look into that idea from a wood turning standpoint and would like to see ideas on it from a scrollsawing standpoint as well .. Perhaps a combination of the two forms of woodworking rolled into the same project.
                              W.Y.
                              http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

                              The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

                              Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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