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  • Tidbits of advice

    The more time I spend at my saw, the more things pop up that make the task easier or quicker. Most of you veterans probably take these for granted but some of the newbies or people who just haven't been scrolling that long, may find these useful. So, please don't say DUH!

    I've only had my Dewalt for a couple weeks or so. One thing that was annoying me was the more times that I unclamp and reclamp the blade, the more of a bend I get in it at the clamp area. This is real aggravating when trying to thread the blade thru a starter hole barely larger than than the blade. That kink really gets tough to push thru. I finally realized that I was clamping it too tight. I recall someone mentioning at one time that the blade does not need to be clamped all that tight. How right they were. Just snug it up and the blade will stay straighter much longer.

    Another thing I've been doing since I started this silly habit, is kicking out the small pieces of wood with the blade. There is nothing wrong with that, if you do it right. I've been doing it with the front of the blade. The only problem with this is if it pops out quicker than expected, the blade may hit a spot you don't want it to. I finally realized that using the back of the blade is not only safer, it actually works just as good if not better.

    One last thing. When the blade finishes the cut, it rarely if ever meets the start of the cut perfectly. I used to always use a needle file to smooth out the minor ridges, afterwards. Awhile ago, I figured out you can smooth out the hump much quicker by running the blade along the ridges before disconnecting the blade.

    Like I said, some of you are going to think DUH but I hope others will find this info helpful.
    Mike

    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

  • #2
    Mike. yes, I AM biting my tongue!! Thats why I always say practice practice practice. experience is the best teacher!!! Thanks for sharing those tips for everyone.The only one I dont agree with is using the blade to lift out a waste area. On a fragile piece, when the waste is being extracted, it can and often will break the wood somewhere along a thin area. I try to manually remove all of my cutouts, for small ones I push an old used up blade through the fret to poke out the waste by hand. Dale
    Dale w/ yella saws

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lucky788scroller
      Mike. yes, I AM biting my tongue!! Thats why I always say practice practice practice. experience is the best teacher!!! Thanks for sharing those tips for everyone.The only one I dont agree with is using the blade to lift out a waste area. On a fragile piece, when the waste is being extracted, it can and often will break the wood somewhere along a thin area. I try to manually remove all of my cutouts, for small ones I push an old used up blade through the fret to poke out the waste by hand. Dale
      I hope your tongue isn't bleeding too much Dale. However, you are right regarding kicking out the cut piece. You do have to use discretion. I should have explained a bit better. In most cases I "kick", but in the case of a highly sensitive area, use extreme caution. Thickness of the wood can also be a factor. The thinner the wood, the more caution must be used. Thanks for pointing this out Dale. Now go bandage your tongue.
      Mike

      Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
      www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Minnesota scroller
        The more time I spend at my saw, the more things pop up that make the task easier or quicker. Most of you veterans probably take these for granted but some of the newbies or people who just haven't been scrolling that long, may find these useful. So, please don't say DUH!

        I've only had my Dewalt for a couple weeks or so. One thing that was annoying me was the more times that I unclamp and reclamp the blade, the more of a bend I get in it at the clamp area.
        this is exactly what I am experiencing with my blades right now and its got me so aggravated that I had to walk away from my scroll saw, I had never experienced this problem with my ryobi and I can assure you I had those blades clamped just as tight as I as I am clamping on my dewalt, I'll give you tip a try Mike and see what happens. Thanks for sharing the tips
        Daryl S. Walters Psycotic scroller with a DeWalt 788

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        • #5
          Biting dales tounge here also --- hummm he taste like chocolate -- Mike that little trick you learned is what I call shaving- I use it a lot and rember- you don't have to run the throttle at full speed either- just cause it will go fast does not mean to drive it top speed.
          Sharon

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          • #6
            I learned one more thing recently. If you wear glasses and things aren't as clear as they should be, clean your glasses. I only wear reading glasses and one morning I started scrolling and thought either my eyes hadn't focused clearly yet or my $1 reading glasses were going bad. Guess what? I had quite a layer of sawdust on my specs. That will distort things.
            Mike

            Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
            www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

            Comment


            • #7
              Good tips Mike, I too use these methods especially the smoothing of my cuts, besides saving you time and not having to file its good practice with control of your blade. I'm guilty of kicking out my cuts with my blade also and have experienced a few mishaps, but I still tend to do it.
              Bill

              DeWalt 788



              aut viam inveniam aut faciam

              God gives us only what we can handle.. Apparently God thinks I am one tough cookie.....

              Comment


              • #8
                Horizontal or Vertical?

                What determines whether you cut your pattern with the wood grain running horizontal or vertical? Is it a matter of what would look best, or is there a more technical reason? Thanks for all the good info I'm getting from this site.

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                • #9
                  Wazabiker,

                  Mostly the way the pattern will look. A zebra or tiger with pronounced horizontal grain or clouds with pronounced vertical grain do not fall into the really good looking design catagory. However, sometimes the use of a piece will determine grain direction. For example, if you are scrolling a V shaped base for a piece, vertical grain will make for a weak spot at the bottom of the V so horizontal grain would be stronger. If it does not make the piece look funny an alternative is to run the grain diagonally.
                  A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
                  George

                  delta 650, hawk G426

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                  • #10
                    sawdustus of hiawatha

                    Mike,
                    Thanks for the reminders. It is too easy to fall into some lazy habits and to forget that the best is always done by those who think before they do.
                    A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
                    George

                    delta 650, hawk G426

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                    • #11
                      Mike, reguarding the dirty glasses. Think of them as your lungs.That is the dust you are breathing in without a mask on. Thats what was told to me before, one of these days I will wise up and get a dustmask. Dale
                      Dale w/ yella saws

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                      • #12
                        Actually Dale, I just got one. It was the one Mick recommended last week. My total investment with 20 additional filters, including shipping was $33 and it's NIOSH approved. My glasses don't even fog up with it on. I've had enough warnings.
                        Mike

                        Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                        www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wazabiker you ask about the grain direction. If the piece is longer than wide then run the grain direction up and down,if the piece is wider than long then run the grain sideways.There are exceptions but that is a matter of taste.
                          Bill
                          Delta P-20

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