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what size sanding mop?

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  • what size sanding mop?

    i need to order a sanding mop for finishing some small scroll sawed items and im
    curious what size mop i should order, 4" or 6"?

    and whats better, a double or single mop?


    + + I Love The Smell Of Sawdust In The Morning + +

  • #2
    Sanding mops

    Never heard of a double sanding mop. I made two six inch mops from Steve Goods plans. Scrollsaw Workshop: Make your own sanding mop on the cheap.
    For one I bought the arbor and the other I just bought a 1/4" bolt with enough smooth shank for the sandpaper. I think the 6" mop keeps my fat knuckles away from the drill press better. Seems to work well for both small and large pieces.
    Pat
    Woodworking is Therapy.... some of us need more therapy than others.

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    • #3
      I have used both single and double mops from Klingspor. The doubles last a bit longer but cost more to start with. Because of the laws of physics, the outer edge of the 6" in mops spin considerably faster than the outer edge of the 4" mops, so you have to set your drill press to a very slow speed, less than 1200 rpm or else you will just be polishing the wood, not sanding it.
      Use the slowest possible drill press speed and just barely touch the piece to the spinning mop for the best results. I personally like the 180 grit mop for most work but use the 120 grit for sanding harder woods and larger pieces. Guaranteed, you will sand you fingernails at the same time as the piece. Tape works but not well.

      george
      A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
      George

      delta 650, hawk G426

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      • #4
        I personaly preffer these. SPINDLE MOUNTED MAC MOP 180 GRIT 7" X 2" | Klingspor's Woodworking Shop
        They seem to last longer and I think they conform better to odd shapes.

        Pat a double mop is just two layers of this type of mop 3X9X1 100 GRIT 6 SLIT GOLD SAND MOP 24PK | Klingspor's Woodworking Shop
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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        • #5
          One of my must have tools is a double sanding mop. I don't use it the same way Sawdustus does, however. I have mine mounted on one side of a grinder motor and a flex drum on the other side. My sanding mops are 220 and 320 grit and I use them for finish sanding after I shape a piece. Did I say my main focus is intarsia?

          The grinder motor turns at 1750 rpm and is perfect for my purpose. The sanding mop smooths the wood and leaves it looking hand rubbed which is exactly what I want. I like the idea that it will take away the imperfections on the surface while not affecting the shape at all. Great tool to have.

          Jan

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          • #6
            which is better for small pieces, a 4" or 6" mop?
            i would think a four inch mop would be a little stiffer and able to get
            into small cuts better?


            + + I Love The Smell Of Sawdust In The Morning + +

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            • #7
              A 6" mop will sand more aggressively than a 4" mop of the same grit, for the reasons stated above. However, the grit is the more important determinant of aggressiveness.

              I use a 180 Mac Mop (see Rolf's post) for aggressive shaping, and a 240 regular mop of less aggressive shaping. I use a 320 for finishing, and also for smoothing the surface after a sealer coat of shellac. I use the 4" for getting inside smaller bowls to polish up the insides.

              Comes down to personal preference, since technique is the main determinant of how it works. Practice first--once something is sanded away you can't put it back!
              Carole

              Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                One note for ANY of the mops.
                When you get a new one use it a bit on some scrap wood first. Maple or oak is good, it breaks the mop in so it is not so aggressive. The Mac mops are soft to start with but the other type is very stiff.
                Rolf
                RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rolf View Post
                  One note for ANY of the mops.
                  When you get a new one use it a bit on some scrap wood first. Maple or oak is good, it breaks the mop in so it is not so aggressive. The Mac mops are soft to start with but the other type is very stiff.
                  that sounds like some good info Rolf

                  i just cant decide which way to go. im making a lot of necklace pendants and they are all roughly the size of a half dollar (1-1/2" square).
                  i dont know which would get into the little sharp corners of the nooks & crannies? but i do assume i need at least 180-220 grit so it dont take off so much material as i just want to round the edges a bit.


                  + + I Love The Smell Of Sawdust In The Morning + +

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                  • #10
                    Either the Mac Mop or the regular sanding mops will easily get into those little nooks and crannies you're worried about. Rolf is right....... be sure, whatever you choose, to take a block of wood and get the mop softened up so that it buffs and does not leave ridges. I find my mops do their best job when they're soft, ratty looking and flex easily when pushed against the wood. As for grit, 220 is going to do some rounding without taking away the basic shape you've cut. If you get too aggressive with grit and speed you're going to find that shape will change and you won't be happy. If I were you, I'd get the 4 inch sanding mop or Mac Mop and experiment with it before you start sanding your pendants. I think you'll be surprised at the quality of finish and edge softening you'll achieve.

                    Jan

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                    • #11
                      I've made similarly sized wooden pendants before and sanded them using the 180 Mac Mop Rolf described, and it worked well. I haven't tried the 220, but it might be the place to start for you, since a new 180 will be aggressive.

                      Personally, I wasn't able to get at the interior cuts of pendants with the sanding mop. It's great for the exterior, but for finishing the interior I still used the old-fashioned rolled-up sandpaper. Good luck.

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                      • #12
                        I use 180 on the hard woods if I want more agressive rounding for all else I use 220
                        Rolf
                        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'd go for the 6" double - it wears away so you end up with a 4" eventually but will definitely last longer. I've been using a 180 - once it wears it acts like a 220.
                          Janette
                          www.square-designs.com

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                          • #14
                            well i got one ordered the other day and i ended up getting a 220 double 6"
                            thanks for everyones advice and i look forward to using it soon. i wouldnt
                            have asked for advice if these things were cheaper as i would have bought
                            a few different ones but sixty bucks is a lot of money for some **** sandpaper!

                            i will report back on how i like it after trying it for awhile.


                            + + I Love The Smell Of Sawdust In The Morning + +

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Who did you order from and does it come with a mandrel?
                              Originally posted by Northerner View Post
                              well i got one ordered the other day and i ended up getting a 220 double 6"
                              thanks for everyones advice and i look forward to using it soon. i wouldnt
                              have asked for advice if these things were cheaper as i would have bought
                              a few different ones but sixty bucks is a lot of money for some **** sandpaper!

                              i will report back on how i like it after trying it for awhile.
                              Bob making sawdust in SW Louisiana
                              with a EX-21

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