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This little guy ate all my blades...

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  • This little guy ate all my blades...

    Well, not all of them but I did go through a lot of blades compared to a few other puzzles I've made recently.

    Not sure what kind of wood this is but I went through about 5 blades cutting this little guy. FD #5 reverse were mediocre and FD ultra reverse burned up faster than you can say "rumpelstiltskin". I even placed clear packing tape on the the wood for the first time. I cut this guy SLOOOWWWWW. Probably took me half an hour or so. I don't think I was rushing the cuts.

    The packing tape caused me some troubles because the dust was collecting just under the tape in front of the blade making it hard to follow my lines.

    Now I have to sand a few burned toes and some other areas... what's the best way to get sandpaper into tight areas like his feet? Wrap it over some cardboard or a 1/16" piece of wood?

    I have another one traced on the same wood and will try again. I'll use a #9 to cut the frog and go back to a #5 for the inside puzzle cuts. Should I use something other than a "Reverse" blade? How about painters tape this time instead of packing tape?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    These things from woodcraft are the best I have found for detail sanding. I balked for months paying $25 for what I thought were just plastic sticks, but these thing s are slick and well built, very good investment.



    Buy 24 Piece Finishing Kit Sanding Sticks at Woodcraft

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    • #3
      It looks like you cut that puzzle out of hard maple. If that's the case, the #5 FD UR didn't stand a chance. Try it again with something like poplar or aspen and see if it's a lot easier. The # 9 blade will cut it more easily, but you're still going to have trouble with the inside cuts if you use a #5. I have to admit I don't use tape on any wood that I cut so I can't give you advice on that problem.

      Jan

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      • #4
        I would put the packing tape on the bottom only. This slides very well on the table and makes cutting easier. I would use FD polar #7 for this. I find #7 to cut faster and easier than #9 does on wood this thick.
        Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
        "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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        • #5
          I find the #5 FD Polar works well on this type of wood.
          T
          Theresa

          http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

          http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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          • #6
            Xray,
            Those little doodads look like they would be great for a variety of small sanding projects. I'll have to check them out next time I'm in a WoodCraft shop.

            Jim Finn,
            It's funny how the most obvious solutions sometimes take the longest to figure out. "Put the tape on the bottom of the puzzle" he says Here I was, ready to drive to the hardware store to grab some painters tape or start putting multiple layers of the packing tape... all on top of the wood again. I'll slap it on the bottom in the future. Thanks a bunch.

            *sigh* I ordered a half gross of blades from Mikes a month or so ago, but sadly, I didn't order any Polar blades. I can't rationalize an order just for some Polar blades so I'll simply switch wood for the time being. I'm glad to know that that Polar are what I should be using on wood with the apparent density of titanium and concrete mixed.

            Thanks all for your time and help.

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            • #7
              when I do a project with an applied pattern, like lettering, I put packing tape top and bottom, spray glue pattern over tape on top.This makes removal of the pattern ,after cutting, easier.
              Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
              "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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              • #8
                I use blue painters tape on top of wood and spray glue onto the tape than put on the pattern. Then I cover all this with the packing tape. I make sure the packing tape is pressed down good using a rolling pin. No trouble with saw dust getting under the tape. I have cut hard maple using #3 FDR without any trouble with this set up.

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                • #9
                  I have read that you can take a 5 inch piece of sand paper and cut it, fold it and put it in your saw to make sanding easier, but after a number of tries I found that just plain old sand paper lasts about 3 minutes if your lucky. No I take used hook and loop sanding discs I'm finished with and I cut two r1/2 inch strips from it. I fold them in half and put them in my DeWalt, man what a difference!! They last forever and do a great job. I think the cloth backing helps the material last so long.. I especially like it for sanding in really small places like between the toes of one of those frogs!!
                  Try it and let me know what you think>>
                  Jack
                  Last edited by WildmanJack; 07-17-2012, 12:16 PM.

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                  • #10
                    There are these little sanding strips that mount in your saw like blades. That might help you, but, I can't think of the name right at this moment.

                    Found the name...Olsen (the blade people) I haven't tried them yet, but they are about due.

                    Or...the little sanding sticks your wife uses on her nails. They are cheap, and might do the job.
                    Last edited by flyboy; 07-17-2012, 02:59 PM.

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                    • #11
                      I've tried the sanding gizmo posted above as well as some other ones and haven't found anything better than the old-fashioned rolled-up piece of sandpaper for getting into spots like the frog's toes, puzzle keyholes, etc.

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                      • #12
                        I can not attest to this yet,but I trying to get my hands on a can of dry moly spray,used on bearings and bushing ,bonds to the metal actually fuses and partially impregnates the metal,reduces friction greatly used yrs ago press fitting 6"x2 3/4' into cast ironplattens -heat and dry ice no could do with 100 ton clamp ,removed ,sprayed with dry moly spray ,pressed slick as you please .I wonder what effect it would have on blades ,should really help,let you know soon as I get my hands on a can ,not cheap ,so trying to get some from a buddies mach shop .Has any body ever tried that?
                        "Home Of The Dust Free Scroll Saw"
                        Remember (IT is WHAT it IS)( Unless YOU change IT!)

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