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Why so many fuzzies with reverse tooth blade?

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  • Why so many fuzzies with reverse tooth blade?

    Finally got back in the shop and I started a new ginger jar today!! I have always had this problem so I thought I would present it to my forum friends and see what you think!!

    Today I'm cutting 3/4" Aspen and using a #5 penguin reverse tooth blade. Like always I have a ton of fuzzies when I get done cutting.
    0041.jpg

    Here's a closer shot:
    006.jpg

    I doesn't matter how thick of wood I'm cutting I always get fuzzies even tho I use a reverse tooth blade. I don't think this is normal is it?? It get really frustrating having to sand them off everything. Any ideas on this?? Thanks so much!!
    Cathy in NE

    "While we try to teach our children all about life, our children teach us what life is all about." - Anonymous

  • #2
    i usually use a propane torch to lightly hit them with flame and singe them off still have to sand but makes it easier for me

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    • #3
      If that is the top of your bowl you have the blade in upside down...Have you tried his ultra reverse blades. I get very few fuzzies...
      "Still Montana Mike"

      "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
      Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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      • #4
        Hi Cathy - good to see you making sawdust - er, I mean fuzzies - again

        If you have the blade in correctly can I ask if you use packing tape between the wood and your pattern? I usually find that pressing packing tape firmly to the wood, with pattern then stuck on top, not only helps to lubricate the blade but also to minimize fuzzies.

        It could also be that the wood is very fibrous, if so try using a #3 size instead of the #5 blade.
        Jim in Mexico

        Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
        - Albert Einstein

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        • #5
          Cathy, I'm surprised you're getting fuzzies, and wonder if the blade is in upside down. I've done that, and the results looked a lot like yours. For bowls, however, fuzzies will disappear when you do the sanding, since it isn't like fretwork. But it is odd--there has to be a reason!
          Carole

          Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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          • #6
            If this is happening with all wood species you cut, then I agree with Mike that you may have the blade in upside down. However, aspen, even though it is hard, is a fibrous wood, and presents me with fuzzies no matter which type of blade I use to cut it.

            george
            A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
            George

            delta 650, hawk G426

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            • #7
              I wish it was as easy as having the blade in upside down but I don't. I have some ultra reverse blades I just didn't care for them as they cut so straight which is funny because most people like that! I will try them again tonight and see what happens. I wondered if maybe the reverse teeth are not "clearing" the opening going up into the wood? Could that be possible since it seems like it happens with everything?? I will check that out after work tonight. Will keep you all posted on what I find.
              Cathy in NE

              "While we try to teach our children all about life, our children teach us what life is all about." - Anonymous

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              • #8
                I notice that I have to take care not to set the blade too far down in the clamps. If I do, then I don't think the reverse teeth make enough contact with the bottom of the wood. When I pay more attention and make sure I set the blade as high in the clamps as I can, I have a lot fewer fuzzies.
                Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                • #9
                  Cathy,
                  Aspen is a very fuzzy wood. From what I see most of your fuzzies are at the end grain.
                  For these type of fuzzies I just kiss them on my mac mop.
                  With the saw off bring the blade all the way up and see, as stated above, if the reverse teeth are above the table.
                  Rolf
                  RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                  Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                  Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                  And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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                  • #10
                    The ultra reverse blades have a 2 down 1 up configuration throughout the blade, so placement is not an issue.

                    Aspen does make a lot of fuzz, but if Cathy is having this problem with other wood, then it must be something else.

                    The mystery deepens . . . . .
                    Carole

                    Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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                    • #11
                      Aspen = fuzzies no matter what. I think having the blade a bit higher may help on the bottom, but not sure about the top. Mop sander should help take care of it.
                      Janette
                      www.square-designs.com

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                      • #12
                        Hi again Cathy - as most folks have confirmed that aspen is a fibrous wood I'd emphasize that you should try a finer blade. The fuzzies will most likely still be there but but smaller and easier to remove with a pass of a mop sander.

                        You should also find that by using a smaller size you'll be able to better control the aggressiveness of those UR blades you seem to be having problems with.

                        Let us know how you go on
                        Jim in Mexico

                        Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                        - Albert Einstein

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                        • #13
                          I agree with the others, Aspen = fuzzies big time. Try this for a test on a scrap piece....use the same blade you cut Aspen with then try something else like Oak or Maple for instance, you should see a big difference with the fuzzie problem.
                          Gloria ............... Two memorable things to say in life, "Hello" for the first time, and "Good-bye" for the last.

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                          • #14
                            Hi Cathy,
                            There are three basic things to remember when scroll sawing.
                            Have good tension, the blade should not move sideways more than 1/8". Have good speed and low feed rate.
                            I use my 2" package tape on top of the pattern. The tape does not lubricate the blade. The tape has a chemical on top so you can un-roll the tape. The chemical is like a silicone and releases friction.
                            You might try to put the blade lower, like other have suggested.
                            FDS Mike
                            SD Mike

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