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  • key hole slot?

    What type of tool makes this kind of cut on the back of a narrow wall hanging for attaching to a nail on the wall?
    Attached Files
    Mike

    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

  • #2
    That's a plunge router with a keyhole bit. simple and easy, but you need to clamp a straight edge on your picture for the router to follow or you'll have a wild looking keyhole. It's a cheap bit to buy too, maybe 5-10 dollars.
    Jeff Powell

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    • #3
      Just for the picture:

      http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-router...30734_22890+48

      I recommend google for other vendors of keyhole router bits.

      Phil

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      • #4
        I'm not crazy about the keyhole bit for my particular project. I am using something that is almost exactly the same. It's a metal keyhole picture hanger. You drill a hole in the back of the picture with a forestner bit the same size as the hanger, then you drill another smaller sized hole in the center with the same tipe of bit. The first hole is the same depth as the thickness of the hanger. The second hole is about 1/4 inch deeper for the screw head to fit in. The hanger is then screwed into the back of the picture where it sits flush. This is extra strong and yet keeps the picture flat on the wall rather than a rope or wire that makes the top of the picture stick out.
        Here's a picture of one that is not quite installed right, but it's the closest example i have nearby.
        Attached Files
        Jeff Powell

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        • #5
          Two questions - how does a plunge router differ from a regular router? What is a forstner bit? The sample I photographed is in the back of a 1" wide cross.

          Thanks
          Mike

          Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
          www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

          Comment


          • #6
            a plunge router is a regular router with a special base that allows you to push down to make plunging cuts. you can adjust the depth of the plunge. you can just take a regular router and angle it down in, but then you get a messy plunge. A forstner bit is like a drill bit but it is flat on the end. comes in many sizes to drill holes. similar to a circle cutting drill bit, but it hogs all the wood out of the middle of the cirlce, where as a regular circle cutter will leave you with a tire. check a magazine or online to see images of these, they are pretty basic tools. A plunge router is not cheap, but a forestner bit is. I thought everyone had these bits...they usually are purchased in a box kit with several sizes.
            Jeff Powell

            Comment


            • #7
              btw, you can use a keyhole bit for a router in a drill press. you can set the depth of the bit, pull down/plunge your drill press, and then pull back on the wood, then push forward and exit up through the entry hole. Clamp a wooden guide on your drill press table to help keep the hole straight when you push forward...i would use a guide on both sides if i was going to use a drill press to perform as a router would. for a lightweight little cross, the keyhole is the best way to go.
              Jeff Powell

              Comment


              • #8
                Question for Jeff or anyone else router savvy. I just picked up a keyhole router bit at Home Depot yesterday. It was a 1/4" Bosch on sale for $14. They also had a no name brand for $5 but it didn't look like it was capable of cutting into wood. Maybe it was for styrofoam. Anyway, why wouldn't a regular router be able to do the same job with this bit as a plunge router? I have an old Stanley router I bought used about 20 years ago and have never really used it because I don't know anything about it. It does have a gizmo on it for depth control. Remember, I'm not a wood worker, just a scroller so I have much to learn.

                Thanks
                Mike

                Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mike,

                  Your regular router can do the job. The approach is different and results can be better with a plunge router in regards to the ease of use.

                  With a regular base, you have to set the depth, then you tilt the router down in order to plunge the bit in the wood.

                  It is easier to show than explain: you need to put the bit over the entry point, then lift one end of the router in order for the bit to be above the entry point so you can start the router without having the bit in contact, then by tilting the raised end down to make full base contact you are plunging the bit in the wood. you then move the bit in the direction of the slot, return to the start point and lift the router squarely away.

                  Hope the description makes sense to you, if not let us know and I'll try to be clearer or someone else may be able to clarify it.

                  Regards,
                  Marcel
                  http://marleb.com
                  DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                  NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You know Marcel, you explained it very well. Tilt, lower, push forward and pull back and out. I pictured it in my mind while you explained it. Thank you very much. If I couldn't have grasped your details , I would have requested a DVD of you working with one.
                    Mike

                    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You got it now, that keyhole is perfect for fretworks, and crosses or whatnot. And you sure can do it like Marcel says, but technically that's the wrong way, just like using a drill press would be the wrong way. I admit I've been lazy and when with the tilt plunge method too. Just be careful, because that is the dangerouse way..when that bit hits the wood on an angle, it can jump up, spin around and gut you. I don't know if it is a fact, but I have heard that the router is the number one cause of workshop injury and death.
                      make some practice cuts on some scrap boards. it helps to clamp a piece of wood on one side to use as a straight edge so your keyhole is not wavy.
                      Jeff Powell

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Mike,

                        I should add since you mentionned being a novice:

                        Clamp your workpiece down safely, and Jeff's suggestion of a guide is a good one for a straight cut.

                        Do be carefull when tilting down, go very slow so the bit doesn't bite a lot at a time. You can also raise the whole base and lower the router squarely, thus acting as the plunge part of the router yourself.

                        I would definitely recommend using a plunge router for this as the safest solution, but hey you make lemonade with lemons, and it should work: fixed bases were the norm for a long time.

                        Regards,
                        Marcel
                        http://marleb.com
                        DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                        NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks guys, for the warnings. I will certainly heed your advice when the time comes. I'm too young to be gutted. It's very handy and valuable being acquainted with seasoned woodworkers such as you guys.
                          Mike

                          Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                          www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One other way you can do it, is first drill a hole just a little bigger then the big diameter on that router bit. Drill that hole to the depth you plan on making your slot, plus a smidge deeper. Clamp a board to be used as a straight edge so your router bit is sitting in that hole.with absolutely no distractions, carefully start the router, allow it to reach full speed, and procede with your cut.
                            One more suggestion? To bad, here it goes anyways! When trying to hang things with a keyhole, balance is critical. Instead of making the traditional keyhole, make a hanging slot. You use the same bit , but instead, cut your slot horizontally.That way, you can adjust your project left or right if its weight is uneven to get it to hang. When I do this, (I do have a plunge router)I clamp a board for a straightedge on the project. I then mark a starting and ending point on that straight edge. I start the router, plumge in at my starting point, move the router to my ending point, then let the router unplunge there, then turn off the router, and LET IT STOP TURNING before picking up the router.The slot looks like this(use your imagination) O---O Routers are like any tool, disrespect it, it will dismember you! Dale
                            Dale w/ yella saws

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                            • #15
                              Dale, those were good suggestions. I especially like the idea of drilling the hole with the drill press first. That sounds safer and it will also save on the router bit. Drill bits are much cheaper. Your second suggestion makes sense too except I'll only be using the keyhole method on items too narrow for a sawtooth hanger.

                              Thanks for the tips.
                              Mike

                              Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                              www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                              Comment

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