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It's August! Think Christmas!

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  • minowevie
    replied
    Wow, those are both wonderful. and some wonderfull advice too. I will just have to try this. when i get my xmas spirit back. woops did i say that.
    that could apply to lots of ocations. Evie

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  • Gill
    replied
    Smashing job, Bruce .

    Gill

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  • CanadianScroller
    replied
    Great Work.
    I am sure the recipients will be delighted.

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  • millwab
    replied
    Blame it on Carter

    For better or worse, here's my first attempt at a Carter-inspired Christmas card puzzle. He was right, by the 3rd or 4th one they didn't look quite like the first one. By the 18th I was getting a little bored and ready for something new. Hopefully they will be received as enthusiastically as they were made. Only had one casualty ... ply delaminated in the middle of cutting it out!

    Bruce
    Attached Files

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  • Carter-Johnson
    replied
    I use Aileen's Tacky Glue, available at most craft atores in a brown squeeze bottle. I have used regular yellow carpenters glue in the past and that works almost as well. I've never had a peeling problem with the thick card stock...

    Good luck.......Carter

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  • millwab
    replied
    Carter, one more question . . .
    when you glue the card front on to the ply, before putting on the triple thick glaze, do you use spray adhesive or something else?

    Bruce

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  • Carter-Johnson
    replied
    Hey, folks....good luck....glad you're going to give this a try... believe me, you will be greatly appreciated!

    Starting with Bill's question, I don't think stack cutting would work because of the exactness required to cut along color lines. Try it if you like, but I prefer to do one at a time.

    And Bruce, I do recommend that you cut the number of pieces down a little. Each of my cards has been about 30 - 35 pieces, just enuf to make putting them together fun for both adults and children down to five years and perhaps four.

    That's a perfect card. I would cut the border randomly (wiggly) , probably 1/4" or less from the original edges to allow room to fit in the envelope and still be snug for mailing.

    Assuming you'll be cutting along color lines, all pieces will have probably have two or more locking tabs. Unless they have naturally locking shapes (like a head or an ear) tabs are necessary for it to fit tightly. For example, your crib will probably be one piece unto itself, with each of the two legs formed into locks and probably two locks on the top. The roof may be three pieces, one for the greenery and one for each of the two wooden ends. Experiment. You'll have a good formula by the time you've done the third one.

    I buy the "triple thick glaze" at craft stores. Krylon makes one but some off brands are better. After one thick coat, just be sure to let each card dry a couple of days beforee cutting.

    Again, good luck....let us know any further questions and keep us appraised of your progress.

    Carter
    Last edited by Carter-Johnson; 08-11-2006, 08:29 AM.

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  • Bill Wilson
    replied
    That's awesome! Very creative, yet simple enough so you can make them by the dozen. I take it you cut each one individually. That's a nice touch. No two are exactly alike. However, do you think stack cutting these is practical for those who may want to try this, but probably won't start until November?

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  • millwab
    replied
    Now you did it!

    Okay, Carter, now you did it! You've convinced me to take the plunge and try doing Christmas card puzzles. I picked up a box of cards last night that looked to me like they might be a good picture for a beginner at this. What do you think?

    If this works, I have plenty of questions for you:
    1) The card measures 7.75"x5.5". Approx how many pieces would you suggest I cut? My first stab (with a pen-not a saw) come up with 55, but I'm not sure how big the pieces should be. For this size picture would it be better to cut that down (no pun intended) to 20-25 pieces instead?

    2) Do I need to cut tabs on every piece, or would the irregular shapes act as a tab?

    3) Approx how much do you need to cut the card down to fit into the envelope on the ply? Any rule of thumb?

    4) You mentioned using "triple thick glaze" to top coat the card before sawing. Is that the name of it and where can I get it? Is this something craft stores sell?

    These will get me started. Sorry if I ask too many questions, but I like to have a good mental picture of what I'm doing before I start cutting.

    Bruce
    Attached Files

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  • draken
    replied
    Ah, so you are recreating the original card using the inside and the posterboard, then tucking the wooden puzzle inside of that to keep it together while removing it from the envelope. Thanks for the clarification, I just may try this....

    Cheers,
    Draken

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  • Forester21
    replied
    Wonderful job as usual Carter!!
    I bought cards last year after Christmas, and they still sit in the bag they came in! Not sure when I will get to trying this, but I do want to! Your work is inspiring!!
    Theresa E

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  • Dusty Buffalo
    replied
    Can we maybe reschedule Christmas for another time? Maybe sometime in late January or early February. I've got too many fall/halloween things going on and I'm not sure when I'll get to Christmas.

    Too much on the to-do list this summer.

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  • Carter-Johnson
    replied
    Pete, I use FD 2/0 "puzzle blades" 90% of the time, occasionally using an 8/0 jewelers blades when working with aromatic cedar (those jobs go much more slowly).

    No pattern. I use the images within the picture as my guide, as you can see. (Note how the chickens sometimes lock it together.) But, I will be the first to admit that, after I've cut a few, I've decided on the best way to cut the picture and all the rest are cut approximately the same. So I guess you can say I develp my own pattern in my head over time. And that's what I advise others to do. In my mind, there's nothing so unchallenging and boring as a puzzle cut in patterned strips from one side and then the other, producing identical square pieces. What's the phun in that?

    Carter

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  • Gill
    replied
    Hi Carter

    Another example of inspirational sawing and another timely reminder.

    Oh, but I just can't focus on Christmas right now... September'll be early enough for me .

    Gill

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  • Back2Jake
    replied
    That is very cool! Seems a lot of scrollers enjoy the puzzles and this is sure to please. Thanks for posting it.

    August already, wow.... I can't believe how fast the year has gone by. When I seen your thread and mentioning Christmas, it was a relief to hear that someone else was thinking the same. For those who do the craft shows, or make presents for family and friends, this is the time to start I suppose.

    Hard to imagine with the heat what its been lately.... but then again, I'm in Canada... I don't associate heat with the holidays.

    Take care
    Toni

    Leave a comment:

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