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  • Gobble, Gobble

    Too much detail and too much of a pain in the neck. From now on, no more than 100 entry holes. My wife's cousin saw my owl and requested a turkey. I should be thrilled. It will be my first sale. I probably made about $2.25 per hour. But I guess nobody pays me for watching TV. This did get quite tiresome after awhile though. I think I'll try to find patterns that are just a little less delicate. This kind stresses me out too much.

    Mike
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Minnesota scroller; 07-12-2006, 09:05 PM.
    Mike

    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

  • #2
    Hey Mike,

    That's the problem with comissioned work: You feel the pressure of completing it quickly, still feel underpaid, and get really frustrated with every little thing that normally goes wrong in every project.

    I feel your pain.

    On the other hand, you did a heck of a nice job on this chicken, and I'm sure it's glad the pain in the neck is yours not it's, He he.

    Very nice,
    Marcel
    http://marleb.com
    DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

    NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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    • #3
      I know the feeling with the frustration with those really detailed patterns ,thats part of the reason why I went to segmentation and it turns out I really enjoy that lol
      Great work on the turkey

      Charlie,
      Charlie
      "Everything Happens for a Reason"
      Craftsman 18in. 21609

      http://wolfmooncreations.weebly.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I really like the turkey, I enjoy patterns like that but I always stack cut them, this way if you do sell them your hourly rate comes up.
        When I start to lose my motivation, I cut a few small things for some instant gratification.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

        Comment


        • #5
          Mike once again ya did good! I'm with Rolf, try stack cutting 2 or 3 pieces of wood, you can sell the extra or keep it for yourself to admire.

          Keep the saw dust flying!!!
          Bill

          DeWalt 788



          aut viam inveniam aut faciam

          God gives us only what we can handle.. Apparently God thinks I am one tough cookie.....

          Comment


          • #6
            Love the turkey. Looks quite tasty.

            I think I would have gone crazy(ier) trying to do something like that. But he does look great.
            Kelly
            "All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." Walt Disney

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            • #7
              Good advice Rolf and Bill, but who else would want a turkey???
              Mike

              Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
              www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

              Comment


              • #8
                mama mea......thatsa lota holes..

                nice job
                Pete Ripaldi

                ---------------------------------
                "Insert Clever Tag Line Here..."

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                • #9
                  May have been frustrating but you must be so pleased seeing the results! Maybe you better tell the recipient not to show anyone in case you get someone else pleading with you to drill another few hundred holes.Lol.
                  Cheers. Teresa .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Awesome gobbler ! Man my neck & shoulders ache just looking at that
                    ...~Robert~
                    DW788 and Hawk 226

                    " Please let me grow to be the man my dog thinks I am "

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      well I have to say all your hard work sure did come off good. and I bet your customer is pleased to death.
                      I would like to ask this here. that is alot of wood hanging out there. all buy itself. how do you handale your wood from bracking while you cut out the other sides. it wonts to bounse some, right. I know I tape mine as i go. but does anyone else have any sugjestions on this. like in Jeffs patterns, the pieces is so small.like hair like wood left. do i make sence. I have never herd anything on this. and sure would like to know. how do you keep the whole piece together, wile cutting the rest out. do you tape top and bottom?? or just let it bounse. and where do you put you finguers. ?? the work i do has bridges. holding the pieces together. but some of the work like this great turky. is so vunaralbale.
                      Evie

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                      • #12
                        Evie,

                        As far as the turkey is concerned I just made sure I cut out all the smallest pieces first because that doesn't amount to too much wood anyway. I saved the large piece till last. Yes, it was kind of hairy cutting out the last large piece but I took it extremely slow, including the blade speed, and placed my fingers very close to the blade. I never thought about taping as I go. That sounds like just one more pain in the neck.

                        Mike
                        Mike

                        Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                        www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The turkey is beautiful! Too many holes for me tho. I used to cut a lot of the original Scroller Ltd. 3D pictures. They were one continuous line for each piece and very fragile. I stacked them 4 layers deep 1/8" BBply and used masking tape over the fragile areas to hold them in place while cutting the rest of the piece. Of course I didn't tape them till I ruined a few very intricate projects.. *sigh I wasn't smart enough to think of it before cutting. Taping is a good idea, Evie.

                          BJ

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Minnesota scroller
                            Evie,

                            As far as the turkey is concerned I just made sure I cut out all the smallest pieces first because that doesn't amount to too much wood anyway. I saved the large piece till last. Yes, it was kind of hairy cutting out the last large piece but I took it extremely slow, including the blade speed, and placed my fingers very close to the blade. I never thought about taping as I go. That sounds like just one more pain in the neck.

                            Mike
                            I agree Mike, taping is alot more work, but so is fixing and or making a new project.
                            Bj masking tape . do you mean the painters tape?? or the off white. that you mask things while painting. i use the blue . I keep small pieces taped to my saw or wook bench. and tear them as i go. into very small pieces if i need too. I find they will even stick to sawdust. but hold my wood together, so as to make it one piece again. and when i stack cut these things. the bottom pieces fall out , some times through the whole in my tabale, thats why i tape the bottom too. if i don't leave it on to long. like for a week or two. the blue tape comes right off, even if it is layered . some times the cuts are so close together. i have to put small pieces on at a time to holed it from moving. but gosh there just has to be a better way. how does jeff do it. i wonder. anyone know.
                            what ever you did to your turkey. it tured out awsome.
                            Evie

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Awhile back I cut out a black lab that was similar to this in that it had a lot of those intricate curves along with huge areas adjacent. On the smaller " squiggly " parts I put the wood back in and taped it, but faced with that " bounce " on the final large areas, I was so afraid of ruining all that work, that in desperation I cut the next large pieces in smaller sections, finding a good place to leave the line, going across to a similar place and back to the start, taped that and took out another section, rinse and repeat s-l-o-w-l-y until i had it all done. It cost me a few more blades and time, and is probably the oldest trick in the book , but it worked for this rookie
                              ...~Robert~
                              DW788 and Hawk 226

                              " Please let me grow to be the man my dog thinks I am "

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