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  • clock oops

    Ok, well, a while back my wife wanted to do a clock for a wedding gift. She decided on the moonlight kiss clock, designed by Wilckens. Anyways, my job was to get all the parts prepped on the tablesaw to the right sizes and such. All went well. We talked about using a movement that plays a tune, instead of the 2 3/4 inch insert called for. So, proceded to drill the 13/32 hole for the movement shaft.Then, her plans changed, and she wanted a wall clock instead, so this one got put aside for a while. Now that the wall clock is in the oiling stage, she decided she would start the moonlight kiss clock again. Cut it all out, sanded nicely, and began assembly . She was in the shower the other night, and I head her saying "oh no! I bet I screwed that up!" and "darn it, I bet thats not right! I messed up!". Not having a clue who she was hiding in the shower with her, I poked my head in the bathroom and asked what the heck shes talking about, and who shes talking to. There wasnt anyone else hiding in the shower with her, but she was talking to herself, thinking about that clock and assembling it, when she realized she glued the thing all together, and now there is no way to get the movement in it once its to that stage!
    So now, the dilemma,theres no way to scroll out the back now that its assembled, not even with a hand fretsaw.There isnt room to set a router on it and plunge through and cut an opening because of the design of the clock.Its design makes it just about impossible to disassemble and correct it, and reassemble, without possibly breaking some nicely cut fragile parts. So, what do I do??????????????????????????????
    The only thing that comes to my mind right now it trying to cut a section out of the back using an offbrand dremel type tool. What would you all do if this was your dilemma? Dale
    Dale w/ yella saws

  • #2
    RotoZip or a dremel with the Rotozip wood cutting bit. Practice on some scrap first to get a feel for the cut. It will want to run. Keep your fingers clear the cutter likes to eat them..
    My Rotozip has pulled my fat out of the fire more than once. The Dremel is smaller and may be more manageable.
    Rolf
    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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    • #3
      Had another thought Xacto makes some nice small saw blade that you can use in one of their handles.
      Rolf
      RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
      Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
      Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
      And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

      Comment


      • #4
        Depending on how well equipped your workshop is, it might be posible to use a router with an inlay template such as this. Of course, you wouldn't use the dainty little templates that are supplied, but make your own.

        I haven't seen the clock you're working on, but it might be possible to mount the template above the delicate pieces that would prohibit you from using the router directly on the clock.

        Gill
        Last edited by Gill; 06-04-2006, 05:59 PM.
        There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
        (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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        • #5
          A couple things come to mind that may or may not help depending on how many parts would have to be removed in order to have no obstructions to a flat back.

          (1) If she used Aleene's Tacky glue it is very easy to remove a few pieces by using a hair blow dryer on highest heat and heating the pieces that are in the way and gently slide a knife blade under them to remove them.

          (2) If plan A worked , then plan B would be to drill a small hole in the back and use the smallest blade on a hand held jig saw and cut a hole in the back and then re-assemble the pieces that were previously removed.
          If anything except Aleene's Tacky glue was used , it could prevent more of a challenge and that is one of the many reasons why way over 90% of fretwork clock makers use that glue.
          I had to remove a lot of pieces from a very complex clock one time when I noticed one panel was in upside down and it came apart and went all back together without too much trouble at all except for the extra time and aggravation. But I talked to it nice and it went quite smoothly
          Hope this is of some help but not knowing that particular clock it is hard to say if this method would be practical or not. Let us know how you make out.
          W.Y.
          http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

          The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us

          Delta P-20 Scroll Saw, 14" x 43" Craftex Wood Lathe and Jet 10" Mini Lathe .

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          • #6
            Dale,
            Another option would be to build a jig that sits over the back of the clock that was big enough to support the router base. The opening in the jig would be sized to use as a template for the door. Below you could add supports to lock the clock in position at the same time. Then you could use your plunge idea to cut an opening.

            Bruce
            Bruce
            . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
            visit sometime
            Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

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            • #7
              thanks for the ideas yall. I am going to try using my B&D dremel type tool, maybe double face taping a straight hunk of some oak to follow as a straight edge. Id hate to ruin the thing, I'll figure it out. As for the router ideas, i thought long and hard on that, and pretty much decided that whatever I had to fabricate to accomplish this would be more work then totally redoing the top section of the clock. For those that arent familiar with the clock, its viewed here http://www.wildwooddesigns.com/prodi...item=1&mitem=4

              dale
              Dale w/ yella saws

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