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  • Now What?

    I've been cutting a picture frame out of MDF using relief cuts to lift a dancing motif clear of the frame and segmentation within the dance motif itself. Perhaps it's better to illustrate this with photographs:



    The painting stage isn't yet completed, but it's nearly done. My question is, how do I make this frame hold a piece of clear acrylic and a photograph? I don't want the project to be very bulky behind. I also need to give the segmented motif some support.

    Gill
    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

  • #2
    Hi Gill,

    The best solution would be to make a rabet(S?) in the back, but that would necessitate either moving the couple forward to accomodate the depth, or thinning them out (not good).

    Another solution would be to add crescent shaped oval supports a little thicker than the combined picture/glass/backing/fastener thickness at intervals. (I've included a dwg)


    Last desparate measure sandwich everything and hot glue to hold

    regards,
    Marcel
    http://marleb.com
    DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

    NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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    • #3
      Great idea Marcel, and good work on the pic!
      CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
      "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
      Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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      • #4
        I like the crescent shaped supports idea, Marcel . Good thinking!

        Thanks

        Gill
        There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
        (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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        • #5


          Think Marcel covered the question, but I wanted to add it was indeed a very nice project.

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          • #6
            Gill I am not sure I understand the quistion. so forgive me if i am roung. BUT ... I just wonder, have you thought about apoxie. you could fill the center. and lift it at the same time with supports. that way you could have a glass finish. and left your project at the same time. kindof a 3D look. you did a great job here. looks great to me. like I am a judg. lol your freind Evie

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            • #7
              Hi Evie

              Now there's food for thought .

              I'm going to adopt the technique Marcel suggested because I've never used epoxy or resin before.

              However, I do like your idea and I'll use it in the near future on another project I've got in mind. Having never used epoxy or resin before, it's going to be a fun learning experience (if a little messy ). Thanks for the suggestion.

              Gill
              There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
              (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

              Comment


              • #8
                HI Gill I use a porduct called GOOP use it to put sheet glass on for backers??
                http://www.picturetrail.com/uid3726744

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                • #9
                  This frame is now finished. I thought you might be interested in seeing how I applied the suggestions made in this thread when it came to fitting the acrylic and backing board. Firstly, I made three cleats and glued them in place on the frame, one at the top and two equidistantly spaced at the bottom. Then I cut a small block with two holes in it. I ran some thread throught the cleats and the block, tying it together loosely. The backing board and acrylic was then slipped into place under the thread. Finally, I tensioned the thread by sliding the block until it was tight.

                  This is all much easier to understand if you look at the photograph below:


                  There's another piece of wood glued to the backer board which you may not recognise - that's just for hanging the frame on a nail or picture hook.

                  If you want to know what it looks like from the front, here it is:



                  Once again, thank you for all your advice folks .

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have said it before....More than just another pretty face!
                    Great work Gill
                    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Gill,

                      It looks good.

                      There's something bothering me though: the tightener with the 2 holes seems to stick out more than the piece of wood on the backing for hanging. Doesn't that cause a problem?

                      Regards,
                      Marcel
                      http://marleb.com
                      DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                      NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Marcel

                        It doesn't seem to cause a problem. As it hangs, the weight of the frame traps the tightening block between the thread and the wall. This makes the block flip through 90 degrees, flattening it against the thread; as a result, the block exerts just a little more pressure and actually helps to maintain the thread tension. Looking at the frame as it hangs in position, you can't tell the block is there.

                        Gill
                        There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                        (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Looks great. A nice creative way to hold it all together. Your pretty good............................ for a girl!!! Dale
                          Dale w/ yella saws

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                          • #14
                            I love how you did that. I have been putting galzing clips on the back of my frames, but your idea is much better and easier. I hope you don't mind if I try that technique on the next frame I make.

                            Jim
                            Jim
                            DeWalt DW788 & Dremel 1680

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                            • #15
                              Oh Man, a chick with a mechanical aptitude. What a great idea. Good on ya!
                              MinotBob
                              Makita MSJ-401
                              Universal Tools:
                              Remember you only really need 2 tools: WD-40 and Duct Tape. If it doesn't move and should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the Duct Tape

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