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  • #16
    OK. one of the things. i have not read, is the band saw blade size. we use ,3/4 deep blades. to rip or resaw a piece of wood.we use 93-1/2X3/4. there is so many blade size's. the amount of teeth per inch and the thicness of the blade.mmmmmmmmmmm? i bet we could do this , if we new the size to use. I get my band saw blades from Woodcraft. do you think that would make a deference, lol not where i get mine , but the blade size. your friend Evie

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    • #17
      I think you may have something there evie- I just have theone blade that came on my saw --have no idea the size but it isn't as good as I could have gotten - had I thought about getting any when I went to the store--dumbie me--duhhhhhh . My son asked me if I could oil the blade tho because it sure did scream cutting that thick poplar..
      Sharon

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      • #18
        ya . Sharon I thought a deeper blade might work. not knowing how thick your wood is. BUT how many teeth???? this is a good thing you brought up. I think it would be a good thing. if we get it right. hahah. like i would know. ha.
        seems like less teeth per inch would not tear out the fret work. BUT ????thats more roome for thought. this would be great. if we could figuer it out.
        I think you have stumbaled on somthing great here. you could be are pianear. is that a word. hahah you could be the first on a new idea. I am excited on finding a answer. how cool huh. your so smat girl. keep this going . i sure have to know. now. I really think it could be done. on any wood.just the right blade , like any other project. your friend Evie

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        • #19
          Sharon - Try oiling of the band saw blade with PAM. I have found that PAM spray is very good. PAM is what I spray in the frying pan to keep eggs from sticking to it. Just spray some PAM on a rag and from the back of the blade, not the front so you don't nick yourself, hold it against both sides of the blade and then rotate the wheel by hand covering the entire length of the blade. Do this occassionally. There is no effect on the wood but it does help in keeping the blade lubricated especially with hardwood.

          Evie - More teeth per inch would be better as it is not as aggressive. Similiar to Scrollsaw blades. The more teeth per inch the cleaner and finer the cut. Less teeth = more aggressive. This would also make for less sanding.

          The best type of blade to use for resawing is 3/4 inch wide, measured from the teeth to the back of the blade, with 3-4 teeth per inch. It is a more aggressive cut. But for resawing a scrolled project I am thinking a properly tensioned 1/4 inch or 1/2 inch blade could do it.

          Uhmmm - Now you have me thinking. When I get the chance I will try the resawing of thicker material, that has been scrolled. Curious to see how it works. This would be a real challenge in harder wood. I am not to optimistic about resawing to get anything less than 1/4 inch though. But won't know til we try - right!

          Paul

          Paul S.

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          • #20
            Paul. your right on that one. more teeth per inch, that would be easyer to cut. but wouldn't more teeth per inch cary more sawdust.? meening more to push through the kerf. on a band saw. taking some of the fretwork with it. ??? or would less teeth per inch go faster. and leave less saw dust in the kerf. seems like we wont to lieve the kerf size as small as possabale. not to tear out any thing on the sides. like fretwork. this is something we need to work on. I am just not sure. maybe we could , pratice. and let each other know what are results are. but good point. mmmmmmmmmmm. more teeth or less teeth. what do you think Sharon.

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            • #21
              Okay girlfriend here is what I think--rember you asked for it --lol.. Thinking like in scrollsaws, more teeth per inch means cleaner smoother cut -- rember the fretwork has already been done so we can't do any aggressive sanding --. Right? right-- now as far as sawdust goes - and on this I may be wrong -=but wood has the same sawdust no matter what size blade - just finer blade means finer dust --
              Thanks paul I have wally world pam now do I want to use butter flavored- canola or just plain ? lol ohh and lest we forget the new floured spray -can't leave that one out ha ha ha .. but seriously I wasn't sure if the blade could be oiled because the oil might penatrate the wood. but I will try it and see if it does help -- seems there just has to be a way to do this --
              Sharon

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              • #22
                I think you want to go to something like 3 teeth per inch so you don`t clog up the blade. To fine of teeth will not get rid of the sawdust fast enough.I wouldn`t be using pam or any other kind of lubricant if it was me, just using the right blade.
                Try this sitehttp://www.suffolkmachinery.com/silicon_steel_slection.asp and click on vertical bandsaw blades, then blade selection chart.
                Last edited by B Smith; 04-08-2006, 12:14 AM.
                Smitty
                Dewalt 788

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                • #23
                  This time, Smitty, we are of a mind . It may seem illogical, but you actually need an aggressive and coarse set on the bandsaw blade in order to clear the sawdust out of the way. That's what I was told by the manufacturer of the DureEdge brand of saw which is so popular on this side of the Pond. I followed his advice and was successful. Also, a sharp blade should obviate the need for a lubricant.

                  Dale - I quite agree that it's better to cut the boards to the right dimension in the first place. However, on this occassion I didn't so I had to find a way to reduce the thickness once it had become apparent that I'd made a mistake.

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                  • #24
                    Gil - Manufacturer was right about clearing sawdust with course teeth. But I am thinking that with scrolled project there is plenty of relief in the cutouts to get rid of sawdust.

                    Smith - Your right. Using the right (Good) blade is one of keys to resawing. However, not many people can afford the best/better blades. I know I didn't for a while and just used what I had. I finally wised up and got the Timberwolf. Oh Yeh, cuts wood like butter. And with proper tensioning there is no waveys going on. In the end I think it is worth the cost. Cheapo blades not only whined but didn't cut as well and sharpness certainly doesn't last long when cutting oak. As for using PAM - it seemed to help when using the less expensive/quality blades and didn't affect the wood. Won't be needing it now though.

                    Sharon - Stay away from flavored. Any flavoring combined with a good looking project resawed may tempt one to take a bite. Might taste good but wouldn't be good for the project.

                    Paul S.

                    Paul S.

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                    • #25
                      would it work

                      Paul S
                      I posted the blade site as a reference for folks to see what kind of blade to use {teeth per inch}with the type of wood being used not to suggest using their blades. No one knows better than I about using what you can afford.My bandsaw consists of a Sears 3 wheel table top handed down from my father in law.All my resawing is done on my table saw but then I very seldom cut anything over 3" wide.
                      Smitty
                      Dewalt 788

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                      • #26
                        Hi all,

                        Here are my thoughts on the subject:

                        To re-saw, I normally go for the widest blade (3/4") with 3 teeth per inch. The reason is that this is a rough cut, the wood will be re-finished after (as in jointed and planed)

                        In the case of re-sawing a finished product, I would go for the highest number of teeth per inch I can, with the widest blade possible to prevent barreling and have the straightest cut possible. But this could very well be a 1/4" blade: it would ultimately depend on the size and shape of the object to be re-sawn(sp?). The fancier the object, the fancier the blade.

                        The sawdust clearance from the blade is not really a concern in this case since the blade moves in one direction only. A higher number of teeth would mean a slower feed rate, and that would have to be balanced against burning by friction (but that could be sanded with a little elbow grease).

                        A wide blade with few teeth would probably be too aggressive and risk breaking your object since we are not talking about a full piece of wood, but rather one that has openings in it.

                        Anyway, just food for thought. In any case I would definitely use a sharp blade for this, to minimize risk of breakage.

                        Regards,
                        Marcel
                        http://marleb.com
                        DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                        NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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                        • #27
                          But Paul -- if I use butter flavored pam and cut my finger then I would have a BUTTERFINGER--since I tend to put my fingers in my mouth when I cut them anyway ---ha ha ha ha -- just have to rember not to bite down -- ouch ..
                          Sharon

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                          • #28
                            Ok, here's my thought on bandsaws. I tell hubby what I want to do, he puts the proper size blade on the bandsaw and I cut away!! Or, I may ask him to try it to make sure it is right and before you know it the wood is all resawn!!! Seriously, he usually uses 1/2 to 3/4 for resawing. He got the blades at a show in January, I think they are Timberwolf (?) replaced the wheel rubbers with some type of silicone ones they were selling at the show, got new cool chucks (whatever they are), made a new resaw thingy that clamps onto the bed of the saw (which I ruined last week but haven't told him yet) that lets the wood feed straight, and everything is fine. I can do the cutting, I just can't get it set up properly. I do know he gets irritated if I resaw, switch to regular cutting and then back to resaw. Takes too long the change and retune the blades, or something like that. Like I said, I'm not the technical one, he is!! I don't know if this helped or not, some things I just stay away from!
                            Betty

                            "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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                            • #29
                              Wow. now I am obsessed with this one. so I went to the master,. MY hubby. and He said. no matter what blade you use. the cut would leave a narly cut whitch would need sanding. a bigger blade would hold a cleaner cut bing more ridged. that made sense. and like marcel said no matter the size. the blade in a band saw only goes one way. whitch would make the cut cleaner. not going up and down. not pulling saw dust back up into the cut. the kerf would be wider. and you would loose more wood. and sanding would lose more. plus the fretwork. I am just wondering. is it worth all the $$$$ to get a cleaner cut. we would need a thicker or should i say deeper?? blade. cost about #22.00 to $29.00 a band saw blade. is it worth the money to do this. hahahahahah
                              I think if you have what you need to do this. anyway. maybe it could be done. depending on the fretwork. but just for me. I think I will stay with stack cutting.glue sticks are too cheap. JUST till I learn more. But I still think you have a great thing going on here. just have to get the thing right. your freind Evie.

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                              • #30
                                It may be to much to mess with on fretwork that is already cut out of hardwood. I have done it on fretwork on BBP and had no problem. I just try to get my 3/4 inch poplar thinner and thought this may kill two birds with one stone.-- guess we missed the birds....
                                Should have known something to good to be true --- sigh .
                                Sharon

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