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  • would it work

    I had a brain storm a bit ago and I thought I d see if any one has tried it or thinks it would work ---here goes.

    Say I have a 1 inch thick - which we know is really 3/4 inches board and I am going to do some fretwork that needs to be 1/4 inch but there would be stack cutting also if it was 1/3--
    What if I did the fretwork on the 3/4 and then resaw it ?? It would save haveing to stack and secure two pieces and even be easier to handle under my scroll saw.. I have done this very successfully on 1/4 in bb but not on poplar. which is what I would resaw.
    any input will be appreciated
    Sharon

  • #2
    Sharon, i suppose it could be done. I have never tried it, but i can picture your fancy fretwork breaking as its resawed, which creates not only a sad face on you, but maybe even a few not so nice words being shouted simultaneously. I myself would stack cut 1/4 layers, and eliminate that fear. Is thin scrolling woods hard to get by you? I can give you a link to absolutely wonderful thin lumber, honest shipping and reasonable prices from wisconsin. Dale
    Dale w/ yella saws

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    • #3
      I'm facing a similar dilemna, Sharon.

      I've just cut the outline a piece which is about 1" thick and which I now realise is going to be too thick for the segmentation to which I'm going to subject it. Some parts of the project are quite fine so I'm thinking of sandwiching them between two boards and then running one of the boards along the bandsaw fence. Of course, I'll have to glue the project on both sides to a board, and separating them after the cut will be difficult.

      I seem to recall Norm Abrams once glued two pieces of wood together with a sheet of paper in between so that he could turn the wood whole. Then, when he'd finished the turning, a tap with a sharp chisel released it. So perhaps using the same technique might work here; glue some paper to each board, then the workpiece to the papers.

      Would anyone care to comment before I give it a go?

      Gill
      There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
      (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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      • #4
        Dale anything under 3/4 inch is impossible to get here unless it is 2 inch wide strips ..Really we don't have the scrollers here like there is up north I don't know of any one in my town or even the cities next to us that scroll . When I was able to get out of the house and I went to the fairs and such they got to where the woood work came from far off that showed .It just isn't that popular here I guess.
        Sharon

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        • #5
          I seem to recall Norm Abrams once glued two pieces of wood together with a sheet of paper in between so that he could turn the wood whole. Then, when he'd finished the turning, a tap with a sharp chisel released it.
          Gill, I do this all the time when working on my lathe. I'll glue the turning to the faceplate with newspaper - only takes a few strips (you don't need to cover the whole surface). Make sure you only put the glue on the paper. You don't want the glue to bond wood to wood. When finished, you pry the pieces apart and the newspaper "separates" leaving fibers on each half you'd have to sand off. Make sure you use newspaper and not correspondence type paper - you want the paper to separate rather easily - unless, of course, the newspaper on your side of the pond is 20#

          Bruce
          Bruce
          . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
          visit sometime
          Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SharonW0111
            I had a brain storm a bit ago and I thought I d see if any one has tried it or thinks it would work ---here goes.

            Say I have a 1 inch thick - which we know is really 3/4 inches board and I am going to do some fretwork that needs to be 1/4 inch but there would be stack cutting also if it was 1/3--
            What if I did the fretwork on the 3/4 and then resaw it ?? It would save haveing to stack and secure two pieces and even be easier to handle under my scroll saw.. I have done this very successfully on 1/4 in bb but not on poplar. which is what I would resaw.
            any input will be appreciated
            Sharon
            Sharon. I have never tried any of the ubove things. but I think your idea has some merit. it is worth a try . but maybe on something that would not matter so much. that would take some of the work out of stack cutting as you say. sounds like you have done this on bb like you said. so try it on poplar. I think i will try this . just to see for myself . your friend Evie

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            • #7
              Yippee! The paper trick works!



              Gill
              There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
              (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

              Comment


              • #8
                When you resaw a piece the cut side is going to be rough. If the fretwork is fragile you may break it out . What are you using to resaw with bandsaw, tablesaw? If the cut side needs to have the saw marks removed it will be very difficult.
                I have never tried resawing fretwork but tried one time to thin out an eagle clock cut from 3/4" oak on my planer and blew it into a million pieces.Needless to say now I am very dilligent on making sure the material is the right thickness.
                Another time I had cut the same eagle clock and had neglected to drill the hole for the clock insert . Went to the drill press awith the 2 3/8 "forstner bit fired it up started drilling the hole , bit grabbed the wood spun it out of my hand ,viola instant puzzle. Never did that again either.
                Smitty
                Dewalt 788

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                • #9
                  But Smitty, there's no point telling me it can't be done because as I said in my previous post I've just done it !

                  I cut it on a bandsaw.

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gill I never said it couldn`t be done. I said it may break on you and that if you need it to be smooth both sides lets say 1/4 thick you are going to have a problem sanding or planeing the cut side without possibly damaging the fretwork.
                    Last edited by B Smith; 04-07-2006, 02:21 PM.
                    Smitty
                    Dewalt 788

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                    • #11
                      Gill,
                      So let me get this straight - you had something cut out that was too thick - so you glued a piece of paper to each side, a piece of wood to each paper, and then resawed the original - it that about it?
                      The original too fat piece - was it segmentation (which is much like a puzzle with no or few voids), or fretwork, with a lot of empty places in it? Was your original still in a piece with straight edges, or was the perimeter irregular? Did you end up with 2 suitable pieces, or 1 correct and one really thin? Did you sand the cut face(s) before breaking the paper joint - for stability? Was it hard to get all the paper off? What sort of glue did you use?
                      As you might guess, I'm thinking this technique has a lot possibilities, and I'd like to learn from your success.
                      Thanx,
                      Sandy

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                      • #12
                        WELLLLLL - being the chicken that I am I tried just resawing a blank piece of poplar that wasn't really great but still was useable- it was a disaster. I am glad it wasn't already worked I did manage to save one piece of the cut board but found that I had to make a good support board to keep the wood from pulling away as I saw. I have only had BBP before to play with and old 2x4s -never any really good wood. I am sure I will get better as I practice but now I think I may have to look at getting a planer if I resaw poplar.
                        and one side was rather rough -- okay for portrates but not for baskets -would a planer solve this ?? hummm I wonder -- well that is for next months dream tool.

                        Sharon

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                        • #13
                          Doubling Back

                          Hi

                          I often use and have had no problems using of Double Sided tape.

                          I use a carpets layer tape, it's broad enough to only use on the edge of the boards and when removed does not leave a yucky sticky residue!

                          Tony Ward
                          www.tonyward.org

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                          • #14
                            Hi Sandy

                            Yes, I made a board, paper, workpiece, paper, board sandwich with PVA glue. It'll never catch on at Pret A Manger!

                            The workpiece itself was solid but the perimeter was irregular. Although there weren't any piercing cuts at this stage, the workpiece had bridges that were quite fragile. I cut the workpiece straight down the centre with a bandsaw, leaving me with two equal pieces. Then I used a chisel to separate the board from each workpiece. The chisel did indent the workpieces slightly, but since they have been cut oversize and the edges will be rounded over anyway, I'm not worried; the dents won't impair the finished project.

                            The newspaper left traces on both the workpieces and the sacrificial boards, but they came off easily with a quick visit to my sanding station. I decided to leave the sanding until after I had removed the workpiece from the board because I wanted to retain as much wood as possible for when it was levered away. I thought this would add strength. Moreover, any dents made by the chisel could be reduced by sanding afterwards.

                            I can't tell you too much about the blade in my bandsaw but it's coarsely set and its tpi is low. It's my standard resaw blade.

                            Gill
                            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              in your opinion...honest.... is that process any better, simpler, faster, or safer then resawing first, and stack cutting? Dale
                              Dale w/ yella saws

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