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  • How do YOU size patterns?

    Interested in how you folks size/duplicate your patterns.

    I used to play the increase/decrease game on the copy machine until I stumbled across "Rapid Resizer". This program is neat. Scan your patterns, save as a jpeg and call them into this program. Then define the area with a simple mouse click and drag box, set the width or height and the other is automatically proportioned. This allows me to cut the same pattern in a variety of sizes.

    And no, I receive NOTHING for or as a result of this post.
    ‎"Orphans are easier to ignore before you know their names. They're easier to ignore before you see their faces. It's easier to pretend they're not real before you hold them in your arms. But once you do, everything changes."

    D. Platt

  • #2
    Originally posted by bearfretworks
    Interested in how you folks size/duplicate your patterns.

    I used to play the increase/decrease game on the copy machine until I stumbled across "Rapid Resizer". This program is neat. Scan your patterns, save as a jpeg and call them into this program. Then define the area with a simple mouse click and drag box, set the width or height and the other is automatically proportioned. This allows me to cut the same pattern in a variety of sizes.

    And no, I receive NOTHING for or as a result of this post.
    Uhmmmm... sounds like increase/decrease on the copier would be easier. If the project needs to be bigger than my copier... I run to Kinko's. .09 for a 14x17 copy

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    • #3
      [HTML]Uhmmmm... sounds like increase/decrease on the copier would be easier. If the project needs to be bigger than my copier... I run to Kinko's. .09 for a 14x17 copy[/HTML]

      Sometimes I need a pattern at an inconvienient time to run to a copier place but I don't worry. I have my scanner working pretty good nowadays and have scanned lots of patterns that I want to re-size. (Provide they are not too big for the scanner) Then I simply insert the jpeg into 'word', crop off anything not wanted then click and drag to size. It always worked well for me and Publisher does the same thing. So although I have seen Rapid Resizer advertised haven't even thought about downloading it. You know the old story .... if it aint broke, don't fix it!
      Cheers. Teresa .

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      • #4
        As the computer file police...I just wanted to warn you all about jpgs...

        Ever gone to a website and gotten the dreaded red x rather than photos? That's because the file was a jpg and got corrupted.

        Jpgs are readable on all computers, and are a relatively small file size, but they are a small file because they are compressed to a varying degree. Since they are compressed, every time you open them, you run the risk of the file corrupting! (even if you just open a thumbnail). If you take the time to scan in your patterns, save them as a TIFF file. They will still be readable on any computer, but will take up a bit more space...I collect 500 mb or so of patterns and burn them on to a cd. Take a printscreen of the folder telling you what files are in it, and attach that to the CD case and you are set.

        Just a warning--nothing is more frustrating than scanning a pattern in, doing all the work you want to do with it, and losing it because of a corrupt file!

        Bob
        www.GrobetUSA.com

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        • #5
          I have a couple of programs to make my JPGs larger.
          Like Bob said though, jpegs, have a lossy compression. each time you modify and save the image some detail is lost.

          Also if the picture is black and white it will sometimes end up larger than a BMP of the same picture.

          In windows, if I can, I like to save as a wmf. I can then enlarge or reduce it with no losses.

          As for my programs. I use a shareware program called poster7 I can enlarge a picture to 100 feet by 100 feet...I havent cut anything that big yet

          I also use Serif software. I can even take clipart from the net at 72dpi and use the software to resample to 300 dpi. The algorithm smooths out the jaggies.

          If I need to print larger than my 8 1/2 x 11 printer will allow the Serif software prints over multiple pages.
          CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
          "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
          Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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          • #6
            I use Rapid Resizer as well. I love it, makes life nice and easy. As I primarily use my own patterns, they're already there on my computer so it's a simple matter of converting them to a .jpg and printing them off in whatever size I wish. Ifranview is a similar program but is freeware.

            Kevin
            Kevin
            Scrollsaw Patterns Online
            Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

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            • #7
              Most all photo software will reduce/enlarge photos, patterns, etc very easily. Most computers already come loaded with Microsoft photo editor. It's not sophisticated but it does the job. I use that or Photo Impace. I scan my patterns into the puter and save the file. I have been saving as JPG but will switch to TIF now that I see Bob's explanation. I think so many people know jpg so that is what is most commonly used but I agree that it's not worth losing something valuable. I do save all my photos and patterns on CD's but from now on they will be in tif format.
              Nedra
              Nedra Denison
              http://sawdustconnection.com
              http://picturetrail.com/nedraspyrography

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              • #8
                Do people still use pantographs?

                I see them in the books all the time and they are easy enough to make.
                CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

                Comment


                • #9
                  Resizing patterns

                  I draw all my patterns on 81/2 x 11 paper and then scan them in to the computer and save them as Tiff files. Like Carl, I have a "poster" program that lets me make them about any size I need and, when printed out in several sheets, even provides reference lines to show me where to trim so the pattern can be taped back together perfectly.
                  If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

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                  • #10
                    resizing patterns

                    I also use rapid resizer the first pattern I print out goes in a plastic sleeve and then into a notebook. When I want a copy of a pattern I take the pattern out make my copy on the scanner and back into the sleeve it goes. I back up my patterns onto cd but you never know when they will crap out on you.That's why I keep a hard copy in a notebook.

                    Mike

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                    • #11
                      Too technical for me

                      I don't have all this fancy schmancy software ,etc. I'm still doing it the old fashioned way.I use a proportional scale.If it's too big for the scanner I just zip into Office Max for 4 cents a copy.I find it to be a whole lot easier than trying to line up the pattern associated with making copies of several smaller sections.
                      "Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."---Thomas Paine

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                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=299t]I don't have all this fancy schmancy software ,etc. ...QUOTE]

                        Okay, I had to look that up, to see if it were a real word or not (schmancy). Here is what I found:

                        Fancy schmancy is one of many examples of Yiddish humor, which offers wonderful, colorful ways of deflating pretension. This particular one is a way of describing someone or something that is pretentiously elaborate or overdressed. Putting on airs.

                        You learn something new everyday.

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