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  • Dealing with tear out

    I know there are many ways of preventing tear out or at least minimizing it. But in the end we still have those dang old FUZZIES !! So what are some of the methods prefered? I've been able to get by using my palm sander, or a needle file, but in surfing another site, I read an interesting tip of using a torch to burn off the fuzzies. Any of you tried this?

    The tip read as follows: I stand the cutting against a piece of scrap wood big enough to completely cover the piece with the back side facing me I then use a torch (yes you read that right) I use a bernzomatic plumbers torch to burn off the fuzzies much the way they used to burn off the pin feathers from a plucked chicken. A few very important things to keep in mind here. Turn the torch way down, make sure the scrap wood totally covers the piece, having all the cut outs with something solid behind them will greatly eliminate scorch marks, keep the torch moving quickly make several passes but don’t hold the torch in one place or you will burn through. Should you find some minor charring on the front, fold a piece of 220 sandpaper and run it in the cut on the front side of the piece, it will quickly remove all but the worst scorches.

    Bill
    Bill

    DeWalt 788



    aut viam inveniam aut faciam

    God gives us only what we can handle.. Apparently God thinks I am one tough cookie.....

  • #2
    Bill,
    The guy who suggested the torch trick does some of the most fantastically detailed "portrait - style" cutting I have ever seen. So... while I have not tried his trick yet, I have full confidence that if done properly, it will be safe and totally effective.
    Let us know how you do with it when you try it. (and I'll do the same, if I'm first)
    Sandy

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    • #3
      Fuzzies - I use them to my advantage!

      I always include a piece of 1/8 birch plywood on the bottom of my stack. While it doesn't prevent fuzzies, it puts them all on a "scrap" and not on my premium hardwoods. I then take my plywood pieces, quickly sand the back to knock off the biggest fuzz and use them for "Finish Your Own Art" kits.

      Each "kit" contains a paintbrush, 1-3 small bottles of paint, and a small piece of sandpaper. The kits are shrink wrapped and sold or given to friend's kids as gifts. They go over real well......
      ‎"Orphans are easier to ignore before you know their names. They're easier to ignore before you see their faces. It's easier to pretend they're not real before you hold them in your arms. But once you do, everything changes."

      D. Platt

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      • #4
        Interesting idea. I also use a piece of plywood on the bottom to protect the premium wood, but spent a lot of time sanding the plywood part to fully clean it up, but I do like your idea better. Will have to give it a try next time.

        ________________
        Chuck...
        Chuck...
        DeWalt 788

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        • #5
          Well I tried Jeff Zaffinos fuzzie removal by fire today on my latest project and by God it works!! My wood is cherry, and I used a spiral blade so I had a fair amount of fuzzies. I clamped it face down to a scrap board and grabbed my torch and took a big breath and went for it.....great results, no scorching on the finish side and just a quick light sanding on the back and I was done.

          ozarkhillbilly

          Bill
          Bill

          DeWalt 788



          aut viam inveniam aut faciam

          God gives us only what we can handle.. Apparently God thinks I am one tough cookie.....

          Comment


          • #6
            Cool, Bill!!
            I had a notion that it would work well, with whose tip it was, but I'm glad to see it confirmed by another scroller. 'Twould have been a real shame if it hadn't. Flame throwing will definitely go into my arsenal of techniques to use now. Thanks for letting us know!
            Sandy

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            • #7
              Hay Bill , thanks for exsperaminting for us. I was a little scared to do this. but now I think Ill try it. that would sure make things easyer. your friend Evie

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