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  • Need help on recessing

    I've seen a picture of this done before but I can't figure out the best way to do it my self. I have a basswood plaque I got from Wal-Mart that has the bark on the edges. I want to recess another pattern into it so it'll be flat. What I can't figure out is how to cut it so they'll be seemless and tight. I could cut the pattern out of the basswood middle but when I cut the outside of the pattern I have no way to hide the pilot hole. Only thing I can think of that might work drill a pilot hole on both and stop at a predetermined point then stack cut. I haven't tried that yet.
    Any suggestion?
    Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
    Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

  • #2
    If you bevel cut it at the right angle and in the right direction, the upper layer will fall into the lower layer tight as you please. Use a tiny drill (a numbered guage wire drill) and a tiny blade, and hide the hole in a corner of the pattern. If it still shows when you're done, fill it with some sawdust from the darker-colored wood mixed with glue.

    The angle you cut at will vary with the thickness of the wood. it should be in the range of 2-10 degrees -- the smaller the blade, the smaller the angle. Try out some different angles on stacked scraps.

    You must cut in one direction all the way around the outline. The direction you cut will depend on whether the table is tilted left or right. Some folks deal with "clockwise left tilt goes down" and so forth but all that's hard to remember and hard to visualize when you're trying to start your cut. I just use the rule that the wood on the downhill side of the blade as you are cutting will fall relative to the wood on the uphill side. Works whichever way you tilt the blade and it's easy to remember.

    here's an example of an inlay done this way:

    Comment


    • #3
      Do you cut both pieces at the same time (stacked on top of each other ) or separately? I guess if you do them separately you have to make a sharp outline and follow it slow exactly. I've never done any bevel cuts so that's a whole new ballgame for me.
      Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
      Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes you stack them on top of one another and the pattern goes on top piece. Use a #5 blade and try tilting at a 4 to 5 degree tilt. Like mentioned this becomes a trial and error thing. When cuting the outline this cut must be continueous and in the same direction. Also when cutting it is very important to not put sideward preasure on the blade as you are cuttin. Every so often back off feed pressure and see if the blade has to pull back in line if so you were putting sideward preasure. After you get the pattern cut out and insert it into the negative portion of the cut and it stands proud a little you can always sand it flush. Now some people like the standing proud look so don't sell it short. Here is an example of what I mean. I know it is a little different than what you are looking for but it is another look.

        John T.

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        • #5
          Stack Cutting

          I will add just one more tip. To help make your blade entry hole less noticeable drill that hole (the smallest that your blade will pass through) at a slighty greater angle than your blade cut angle. Position the hole so that most of the hole on the top is in the inner, or waste, peice and most of the hole on the bottom is in the outer, or waste, peice. The blade rides against the pattern line side of the hole on top and against the opposite side of the bottom hole. You may have to sketch this to arrive at the correct drilling angle but it does work and the entry hole is hardly noticeable.

          Don

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          • #6
            What a great tip, Don! I hadn't thought of that at all.

            Comment


            • #7
              When cutting the inlays, do they have to be cut on an angle? Can they be cut on a regular 90 degree angle? If both pieces are 1/2" thick they'll be even height wise. I thought of taking an outline pattern and tracing it onto my base piece. Drill a pilot hole in the 4 corners of the waste and saw to the exact edge in all 4 corners. Take piece that is to be inlyed and cut from 4 corners into the exact outside edge. I then would lay it on top of base piece and aline the 4 holes then clamp or glue. I put feed saw blade through and cut both pieces stacked and then they will fit exactly.
              How does that sound? Cutting on a bevel is kinda intimidating for me at this point. I'm not that far along yet so this is this best alternative I can come up with.
              Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
              Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

              Comment


              • #8
                Cutting on an angle is going to be easier than how you described doing it otherwise - if you try to cut 2 things exactly the same, you will need to do some sanding to make them both fit the way they need to.
                When you cut at an angle, and by stack cutting, any error made on one also gets made on the other.

                Give the angle cutting a try using some of your scrap wood - it takes some adjusting of the angle to make them perfectly flush, but when you get close, sand paper will help you get to "perfect".
                Theresa

                http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  The problem with cutting the pieces at 90 degrees is there will be a gap around the entire piece because of the kerf of the blade. You do not want that. Cutting on an angle is really no big deal Try on a scrap piece and start with 2 degree bevel and see what that leaves you it maybe all you need if you are using 1/8" inlay pieces.
                  John T.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There is one more variable to keep in mind and that is the blade thickness that you use. Not only wood thickness but kerf width also determines how much angle you need. Decide what blade size you will be using and when you do your experimenting stay with that same blade size.

                    Don

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Scrollers,
                      Help me out here. I've not tried stack cutting at an angle yet, but I like the idea of this technique for an inlay. However, I would think that the bottom of the top piece and the top of the bottom piece would have the same dimension. How does it "fall" into the space? The only difference I can tell would be the thickness of the blade. If I'm understanding this correctly, the difference between the outside of the blade exiting the top of the top piece and the inside of the blade exiting the bottom of the bottom piece (angle) can't exceed the thickness of the blade (or at lease it's kerf). That's not a whole lot to work with. Am I missing something, or just in awe of those that can eye that small of an angle?

                      Bruce
                      Bruce
                      . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
                      visit sometime
                      Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Rather than try to explain, just do this: Take a couple pieces of 1/4 inch scrap and stack them. Set your table at about 2 1/2 degrees and cut a circle from the center of the scrap. Note how far the top circle fits into the hole of the bottom circle. Then do the same thing with 1/2 inch stock. It should all make sense then. Depending on which direction you cut (clockwise or counter clockwise) the circle you cut will either lift up into the top piece or drop into the bottom piece.
                        If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Would my initial set-up idea work for getting started and both pieces aligned? The tracing outline, 4 corner pilot holes, saw to exact edge of both, attach (stack) 2 pieces together then cut.
                          After I get them attached I take it that all I do then is cut on a 2-3 degree angle and go 1 way only whether it is CW or CCW. I just noticed Neal say that cutting 1 way will lift my inlay piece up above the bottom and another will drop it down. Which way is which? I didn't know that or think of it. Angles and geometry ain't my forte.
                          I'm getting the idea slowly but surely. Just bear with me please.
                          Last edited by Capt Weasel; 11-17-2005, 08:47 PM.
                          Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
                          Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Capt.

                            Not following your intent at all sorry. If you tilt the table to the left and scroll the piece counterclockwise it will push up to tighten as shown with my magazine rack. As Neil said take some scrap and try it. First tilt table to the left and cut a circle counterclockwise and then leave table and cut clockwise and see the difference and now match to what you are after. The idea of drilling 4 hole does not make sense. You only need one starter hole.If I had more time I would take some photos for you but I have a show this weekend and next and I am a little busy. If you are still having problems Iwill try next week for you.
                            John T.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The idea of the 4 holes is to get the top piece aligned and centered on top of the bottom. And by scrolling out the predrawn line on the bottom piece and into the pattern line on the top I thought I might would then be able stack the 2 together, slid blade up through the bottom piece right on line, through top piece right on line the cut both. This way I though I might be able to avoid drilling pilot holes into both that will either show or I'll have to do some fixing up so they wouldn't be seen. The 4 holes are a seperate idea and question from the "how to get it to fit" question. I should have stated them clearer. Reading back over the post I can see the confusion I guess.
                              Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
                              Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

                              Comment

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