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  • Questions for the Experts

    We're starting a new column in the Spring 2006 issue--I know it seems like a long way off, but I have to get my work done ahead of time.

    The column gives you readers a chance to ask questions from the experts--and we've got a variety of experts to ask. So to get this started, post your questions here.

    I envision questions like:

    What is the best blade to cut compound patterns?

    When is a wood too hard to cut on a scroll saw?

    What is a good program to make patterns with?

    Questions like that!

    If you have questions you don't want to post here, feel free to PM me!

    Bob
    www.GrobetUSA.com

  • #2
    Pattern design questions

    When designing patterns for scrolling do any of the pros draw the pattern by hand first, then scan it in for tweaking on the computer?
    Do any just produce the hand drawn artwork?
    What width of line is best for reproduction of the pattern on the newsprint in the pull out of the magazine?
    Do users prefer the pieces that need to be removed by cutting shaded for ease of sawing?
    If a pattern is too big for a single sheet of paper what is the best way to register the two sheets together?

    Thats all that is in my head for now.
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

    Comment


    • #3
      Cutting thick, hard woods

      I have been trying to cut a fretwork pattern out of 1" bubinga, which is a very hard wood. Small blades barely cut the wood and larger ones (Olson PGT #5,#7) catch badly on the turns. I haven't tried a #9 blade, but I don't see how I can make the tight turns. Changing machine speed to higher or lower settings hasn't helped.

      I hate to give up on the bubinga because I think it is the right wood and the right thickness for this project, but I'm stumped right now. Any suggestions on technique or blade?

      Thanks,
      Dan Urban

      Comment


      • #4
        Dan, I cut the shape of Wisconsin out of 3/4" bubinga using a #5 precision ground blade. Took 2 blades to get around it, the finished size was about 7" X 4". Had the saw set at about medium speed, no burning but that wood sure had a bad smell. Check with Mike at www.mikesworkshop.com. He may be able to help. Good luck with it. Mick.
        Mick, - Delta P-20

        A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the info and encouragement

          Mick,
          Thanks for the information and encouragement. My main problem was the blade catching on the tight inside turns, but I'll give it another try. I'm recovering from hand surgery right now, but in a month or so I'll be ready.

          Thanks also for Mike's website address. It's a very interesting site, and Mike seems like a guy I'd like to meet. I think I'll give the Flying Dutchman blades a try, too.

          Dan

          Comment


          • #6
            Any other questions for the experts?

            Bob
            www.GrobetUSA.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Selection of wood for a project, not so much the species, but the cut.
              The grain selection.
              Any help on sand paper selection and use... like when to use the different types, garnet etc.

              Any finishing techniques.
              CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
              "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
              Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

              Comment


              • #8
                In general should I try to set my wood up so when I need to make tight turns to have them be more right (counterclockwise) than left due to the direction the blade wants to drift?

                When looking at a complex pattern how do you determine where to make your first cut (bisect the pattern, internal voids first)?
                Sawdust King

                If there is one thing I can make perfect every time it is sawdust.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Urban -- try cutting the corners kind of like parallel parking -- go straight down to the line you want the turn to be- then back up- then angle it into the line that is the main side. once or twice doing this will give you enough space to turn the blade and you should have a near perfect angle that way ---- example - cut line to point of turn and stop --then back up and go / way or \ way into that first cut ..got my drift? hope so cause i am terrible at drawing from a keyboard..
                  Sharon
                  Last edited by CanadianScroller; 01-31-2006, 07:48 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sharon,
                    Thanks for the idea. I'm sure that's the solution. I don't know why I didn't think of it, other than being old and narrow minded.

                    Dan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Urban - you are only as old as your mind allows you to be--- but age wise I was around before the dinisoars roamed the earth ...I'm just a woman thats all lol
                      Sharon

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Sharon,
                        Dan is my first name, Urban is my last.
                        Dan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          thank you dan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sharon. your not old. you have just been young longer. hahahahahah. that would be me too. haha. your friend Evie

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sawdust King, When cutting a complex pattern I start cutting all the small ones in the middle of the pattern working towards the outside. I then start cutting the next larger ones and tape the pieces back in place with scotch tape. Depends on the thickness of the piece I am cutting. 1/8" wood can get pretty weak with a lot of large pieces cut out. 1/4" and thicker pieces are fairly sturdy. Mick. P-20
                              Mick, - Delta P-20

                              A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

                              Comment

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