Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Double sided pattern pullout

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Double sided pattern pullout

    Hey everyone,
    We received a letter from a reader who was paying an a large sum of money to have the whole pattern pullout photocopied as one piece (he didn't want to cut it up because there were patterns on both sides). We suggested that he make several copies on a standard copier (at approx. $0.10 a copy) and tape them together. How do you all handle this?

    Bob
    www.GrobetUSA.com

  • #2
    Hmmm, see I would never have thought to have the whole page copied.

    I photocopy the parts of the pattern pullout sheet that I want to use, or trace the pattern if it is large.

    Comment


    • #3
      I just copy the parts I want - I wouldn't think it would cost anything near even $10 to copy all of both sides. Then a session with scissors and tape or a glue stick - just remember to copy everything with a bit of overlap, so's it goes together easily. Now -- How to keep from losing (or misplacing) that original. Anybody got a great solution for that?? Once I pull it out of the magazine, it seems to sprout legs, or wings, or whatever.
      Sandy

      Comment


      • #4
        In order to keep the pattern pullouts in good shape and in some order, I remove them from the magazines, then put them in an 8x10 envelope in a file cabinet. I mark on the outside of the envelope the magazine issue and a brief summary of the patterns enclosed.

        Above my filing cabinets, I have the magazines in the box style magazine holders, in order of issue date. The system isn't perfect but it does allow me or others to look through the magazines quickly and if they like something for a project, they can pull the patterns.

        Comment


        • #5
          When I pullout the patterns, I put the patterns and magazine in a clear sleeve, that way both are together. HOWEVER, Scrollsaw is too large for the sleeve so put the pattern in the sleeve, put in a hanging file folder marked "ScrollSaw" and file it behind the magazine in my filing cabinet. If I want to copy all of the patterns, which is seldom the case, I just copy on 8 x 10, cut and paste the patterns so each pattern is together and then recopy. Copies at our local Office Depot are 4 cents for each copy. Then, there is my hubby who will recopy everything for me for free! Can't beat that price.
          Betty

          "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

          Comment


          • #6
            As far as copying I do about the same as others if the pattern is small enough. I only copy the pattern I want and not the whole thing. Even if the pattern calls for more than one piece I just copy individual pieces for it is far cheaper than copying the entire pullout. Now I have stopped making copies of a large piece and taping them together. If that piece needs to be a full size pattern I have learned over the years it is better to make one large copy. Yes it cost more but cheaper in the long run. As with many copiers things get distorted when copied and trying to line up pattern lines sometimes just doesn't work and the pattern is off balanced. It looks weird. So I spend the little extra cash to make a full size copy. I have found the best cpoiers at Kinko"s they are true and no distortion. They also have the ability to do cad drawings of larger prints. You also try not to copy a copy because if the first one was distorted than the next is going to be even worse. Just an observation I have seen over the years. Yes copiers have gotten better but places like office max and Staples have some of the worse copiers I have found. It does not look bad but after copying a pattern hold it against the original and up to the light and you will see what I mean. This is just my opinion.
            John T.

            Comment


            • #7
              I keep both the magazines and their pull out patterns in a three ring binder. I drill the magazines, using a quickie jig, to fit the rings in the binder and then put the full size patterns in a clear sleeve right behind each issue. As for copying large patterns, I usually just do it in sections and tape them together. Yes, there is some distortion that way, but given my skill level, that's probably the least of my problems.

              Jim
              Jim

              Comment


              • #8
                Patterns

                Over the years I have compiled a note book of "master" patterns in an 8 1/2 x 11 format. Either compress or enlarge the pattern to fit the page. Then use the Rapidresizer program to print the pattern out in a size to fit the project. Learned the hard way that it is important to write "master" on the master in red if you utilize a copy shop to make duplicates. Helps keep the master off the wood. By doing it this way I have only ONE place to look for a pattern. For large patterns that are used frequently I make a 6 mil baltic birch template, smaller patterns plexiglas can be used for the template. Helps you avoid flaws in the wood when tracing out the patterns.
                AuDust
                ________________________________
                Any day above ground is a good day...to be scrolling

                Comment


                • #9
                  I take the fold outs to work and after several attempts, I can usally get an 11 1/2 x 17" copy of the pattern I want. I then just cut and trim around it and take it back to the copy machine and make 8 1/2 x 11" copies or whatever size they are sized to. I do need to come up with a system to store my patterns.

                  I've been considering buying a large scanner where I can scan the pattern into my PC and print it from there. That would also have the advantage of allowing me to customize that pattern either size or adding my own touch,

                  I made some dragon clocks for presents for friends and I thought they turned out nice. However, they were fairly small and I had a nice piece of oak that was almost 12" wide in my scrap pile. If I didn't enlarge the pattern, much of my Oak would be wasted.

                  I took a digital photo of the pattern and enlarged it using Paint Shop Pro. The finished work turned out great. I had to go to a 2 3/4" clock instead of the 1 7/16. A scanner would be a lot easier however.

                  Roy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you have a regular scanner, its possible to scan it in sections and join the them together...but a large scanner makes it easier!


                    Bob
                    www.GrobetUSA.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bob,

                      If they want to copy the whole page at once they should go to a company who copies blue prints for home builders and architects. They charge me only $ 1.75 a copy.

                      Mike M
                      SD Mike

                      Comment

                      Unconfigured Ad Widget

                      Collapse

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      Working...
                      X