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Outdoor preservation of a portrait in wood.

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  • Outdoor preservation of a portrait in wood.

    Hello folks, I need to pick your brains again.

    Back in January a gentleman contacted me and said that he would be calling me in the Spring to do a portrait of his very young child who passed away at 5 years old last year.

    I am dreading it to be honest. To stare at a pic of a wonderful little boy knowing that he is no longer with us is going to break my heart.

    The family wants me to do a portrait in wood that they wish to place outside as a memorial on their property.

    They asked me what would be the best way to protect the piece against the elements and to be honest I really don't know.

    I told him that a plexi-glass casing would probably do it...but again, it's not something I have much idea about.

    Has anyone done anything similar to this?

    Thanks guys.
    Check me out on the web:
    http://www.kerrysworld.com

  • #2
    My first choice would to be cut the entire project from plexi or corian
    I have done some fretwork for outdoors but the plies in the wood finaly gave out.
    The glue wasnt the best.
    I am not a finisher so I will stand back and learn too.
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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    • #3
      Kerry,
      You didn't give any idea of dimensions for this project. The Corian may give you good weather resistance, but if it isn't available to you or is too expensive, you may want to consider a wood like cedar that is naturally resistant to rotting.
      Has anyone ever tried to scroll the manmade decking products (e.g. Trex)? They're supposed to last forever outside - above ground, in ground, under ground - I'm just not sure how it would hold up structurally after making swiss cheese out of it. I'm thinking it might be too brittle.
      Bruce
      . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
      visit sometime
      Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

      Comment


      • #4
        My vote also goes for corian or Cedar...especially if you treat the cedar with spar varnish.

        Bob

        BTW...(as I write this I feel selfish) but doing the memorial for the family is really going to help them out as far as the grieving process goes...I know it will be tough, Kerry, but it will really mean something to them!!! I know...I lost my son 5 years ago when he was 3.5 days old! I've carved his likeness several times and each one helped!
        www.GrobetUSA.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BobD
          BTW...(as I write this I feel selfish) but doing the memorial for the family is really going to help them out as far as the grieving process goes...I know it will be tough, Kerry, but it will really mean something to them!!! I know...I lost my son 5 years ago when he was 3.5 days old! I've carved his likeness several times and each one helped!
          Bob, I'm so sorry to hear about the loss of your son. My heart goes out to you...as I know how this would certainly affect me.
          Check me out on the web:
          http://www.kerrysworld.com

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          • #6
            Very good advice so far. The gentleman indicated he liked the size of the samples he saw on display at a store near my home which was 11x14. I will probably try and do it at that size for him.

            As far as the plexi-glass case, is this even feasable (not too expensive)? Would the headstone places be able to do this kind of thing I wonder?
            Check me out on the web:
            http://www.kerrysworld.com

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            • #7
              I vote for the cedar or corian as well. Cypress is another weather resistant wood that is, sometimes, less expensive.

              As for the memorial cutting, well......I believe being asked to make the cutting is one of the greatest honors you could recieve. I am sure I would shed many a tear if I were working on such a project, but I also know that it will be one of the finest pieces I ever made.

              Good luck!
              ‎"Orphans are easier to ignore before you know their names. They're easier to ignore before you see their faces. It's easier to pretend they're not real before you hold them in your arms. But once you do, everything changes."

              D. Platt

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              • #8
                Just be sure to wear your dust mask if cutting cedar or cypress...no wood is good for your lungs, but those two are really not good! If they are toxic to bacteria, fungus, and insects...they are bad for you too!

                Bob
                www.GrobetUSA.com

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                • #9
                  Hi Kerry

                  I've never tried this myself, but I'd seriously consider casting the completed project in clear resin.

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gill
                    Hi Kerry

                    I've never tried this myself, but I'd seriously consider casting the completed project in clear resin.

                    Gill
                    Hmmm...that's an interesting idea...thanks Gill.
                    Check me out on the web:
                    http://www.kerrysworld.com

                    Comment

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