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Removing patterns with a heat gun

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  • Removing patterns with a heat gun

    I use 3M Super 77 spray adhesive to attach my patterns to my workpiece. I spray it on heavily so as to prevent the pattern from lifting up while cutting delicate areas.

    I thought that removing the pattern was going to be a major pain in the neck. Fortunately, my dad has a solution that he has been using for years: a heat gun. His is a Milwaukee model that blows 50oF - 1000oF hot air.

    You have to work in small (4 x 4 inch) sections and keep the gun moving so you don't scorch the pattern or the workpiece. After about 5 seconds of heat, the pattern can be easily lifted - even from delicate areas. You want to heat just enough to weaken the glue so the pattern will lift up. Overheating will just result in more glue residue left on the workpiece.

    Once the pattern is off, I sand off any remaining glue residue with 100 grit sandpaper.

    BTW, a heat gun has many other uses that will justify its purchase. These include stripping paint, removing floor tiles, and thawing ice encrusted locks.
    Attached Files
    Inside every piece of lumber, there is a pile of sawdust waiting to be uncovered

    -Andy-

  • #2
    Heat Gun

    I've been using a regular hair dryer for years. it works fine and no chance of scorching anything.
    Buzz
    We Danes are very even tempered. We're always mad about something!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by QTOFFER
      BTW, a heat gun has many other uses that will justify its purchase. These include stripping paint, removing floor tiles

      I once tried the latter with a regular hair drier - which burnt out in about 10 mins. Guess who was in the doghouse?
      Ian

      Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

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      • #4
        I always cover the workpiece with painters tape first, the glue the pattern on top, and when done just peel it off...works very well.
        Check me out on the web:
        http://www.kerrysworld.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by kerry_nf
          I always cover the workpiece with painters tape first, the glue the pattern on top, and when done just peel it off...works very well.
          Yes, me too. I was a bit concerned that the tape might pull off delicate pieces but so far so good ...
          Ian

          Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

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          • #6
            I use the lavender or purple masking tape and can leave it on the wood for days and have no problem peeling it off. I started with the blue tape but like the lavender better.
            Mick, - Delta P-20

            A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

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            • #7
              I find the trick with the Painter's tape is to peel every so slowly and sometimes apply support with your fingers to the more delicate pieces you might we worried about breaking.
              Check me out on the web:
              http://www.kerrysworld.com

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              • #8
                I use the Duro spray adhesive and attach it directly to the wood. I use the hair dryer method for removal after I remove the pattern I wipe the residue of glue off with mineral spirits and let that dry then sand the piece. The mineral spirit trick will help to not clog up your sandpaper. Steve
                If This HillBilly Can't Fix it Then it Ain't Broke!!!
                My Gallery
                [email protected]

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                • #9
                  Folks, someone suggested a while back to cover the wood with clear Contact and glue the pattern to that. I have been doing that lately and am extremely pleased. I used it on the JZ pattern I did and had no problem with breaking. Comes off clean. Give it a try.

                  Earl

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                  • #10
                    I used some clear tape on a project this weekend and used adhesive spray to adhere the pattern to the tape. It wasn't on there long and the tape peeled right up. Out of the two ways I have used so far, this is my preference.

                    Pops

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                    • #11
                      I think the mineral spirits is the best way to go, I glue the pattern right to the wood and spray right on to the pattern when I am done the pattern normally comes right off with very little glue left behind if not any glue,Also the pattern normally comes off in one peice.

                      Jerry
                      Don't worry be scrolling

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                      • #12
                        Ditto to Jerry, I also have a heat gun that I used until I read in an article about mineral spirits, works really well. If any glue is left behind you can use a little mineral spirits on the wood to remove it. It dries really fast and dosn't affect any finishes that I have used.
                        Troy

                        Scrollin' with DeWalt DW788

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                        • #13
                          heat gun

                          been using heat gun for several years with no problem at all >Figured if heat gun can take dealers logo off cars it surely would work for elmers and it does

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                          • #14
                            Ditto on the Mineral spirits. Thats what I prefer.
                            Red
                            RED.
                            New owner of a Dewalt DW788

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