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Enhancement of purchased wood bowl

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  • Enhancement of purchased wood bowl

    Earlier I mentioned that I had found a wood bowl, 13 inches diameter x about 4 1/2 inches deep, at the local Thrift Store. Below are a couple of pictures of the bowl. One is of the bowl as I purchased it and the second is with the pattern I plan to use to saw a design around the top of the bowl. This is the first time I am doing this and I expect there to be a few challenges along the way. I will probably have to drill more than one starting hole in each opening in order to get into the corners of the opening. I also expect to reverse the direction of my blade so the teeth are facing the back of the throat and I will be pulling the bowl towards me as I saw. No doubt it will be slow going. I will keep you updated on my progress and maybe have a video if I can manage it


    Garry


    . DSCN7557.jpg DSCN7556.jpg

  • #2
    The pattern is from Patrick Spielman and Carl Roehl's book Making Bowls with a Router and Scroll Saw (about 1990).

    Garry

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    • #3
      Going to be challenge. Can't wait to see progress and finished project.
      Jim
      When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
      Too early to leave, too late to call in.

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      • #4
        That was the book that opened my eyes to how beautiful scroll saw bowls could be. I adapted his technique so a router wasn’t necessary, and used his beautiful bowls as an inspiration to develop my own style.

        I did try one of his cut rims back then. It was the first and last attempt I ever made, since my cutting skills were not up to the task. I’m looking forward to seeing how you make out, hopefully better than I did!
        Carole

        Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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        • #5
          Maybe post a few pictures of you actually doing this bowl!!
          Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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          • #6
            Looking forward to progress on this project! like Linda said pictures of the process would be greatly appreciated..
            Rolf
            RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
            Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
            Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
            And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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            • #7
              Pictures of the progress would be great.
              Denny
              ArtCrafters in Dayton, TN

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              • #8
                Original pattern was to fit 7 1/2 inch dia bowl. I enlarged it and made several copies so it could be joined and fit on the inside of the bowl. Rather than glue the pattern directly to the bowl I used green painter’s tape to cover the inside of the bowl and around the upper lip. I then used 3M Super 77 to glue the pattern on over the painters tape.

                1/16” starting holes were drilled near the tip of the slanted opening to be sawn closest to the edge of the rim to allow sawing toward the opposite tip. I am using Pegas #3R MGT blades on a Hegner 22 inch saw with the speed set at about 900. First one side was sawn, then the blade was backed to the start and then the other side sawn. Part of the waste area can now be removed but there is a small portion near the edge of the rim that needs to be sawn later and cleaned up.

                The thickness of the bowl sides is 3/8 inch which is thicker than I had thought they would be.

                I tried sawing the wavy rim next. Starting at the high point of the wave I sawed toward the lower area. The angle that I am sawing at allowed me to saw a little past centre of the low area but no further. I then had to back out, turn my bowl to the opposite side of the saw arm so I could again saw from the high part of the wave to meet the previous saw cut at the low point and remove the waste. In order to saw around the rim the bowl it will have to be flipped from one side of the saw arm to the other and each short section sawn and removed.

                Keeping the bowl flat on the saw table at the point where I am sawing is very difficult to do and therefore my cut is slanted a bit. Hopefully sanding at the finish of sawing will help correct this especially where two cuts meet.


                Garry


                DSCN7560 1.jpg





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                DSCN7562.jpg


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                • #9
                  Looking good so far. The fact that the sides are so thick adds a level of difficulty. All of Roehl’s bowls were cut with 1/4” thick sides to begin with, which means that once sanded, they would be about 1/8” thick.

                  However, the fact that you’re using a ready-made bowl ensures that the sides are likely to be more uniform than if you were starting from scratch. Sanding when you’ve finished your cuts will most likely be an important step to getting a finished look.

                  One of the real shortcomings of the Roehl and Spielman book is that there are no easy projects to ease you into bowl-making, or explanations of the process or how the angles were derived. Its major strength, in my opinion, is to showcase the enormous talents and imagination of the man, and open up a world of possibilities. And for that I am grateful.

                  Looking forward to seeing your progress.
                  Carole

                  Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Carole. Did you have any tricks/tips that you used in supporting the bowl while sawing. The trouble is that the bowl is always moving and therefore the angle is changing continuously. I think just taking my time and going slowly is necessary. I am sure that as I continue sawing will get easier. That is until I have to saw backwards or something. Will continue to add some more comments and pictures.

                    Garry

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                    • #11
                      Garry, I found the cutting very frustrating. I suspect that someone talented with spiral blades (like Charles Dearing) would have an easier time accessing the hard to reach areas. I did manage one bowl, was not satisfied with its appearance, and decided this was not for me. I'll cut, or sand, an outer profile once a bowl is completed, but that's about as far as I'll go.

                      Also, with the thinner sides that Roehl had for his bowls, the ever-changing angle would have been less of an issue. I recall the frustration of trying to reach all the areas, without hitting the wood against the moving arm of the saw. The man must have taken years to hone his skills, then presented these projects, with Spielman's help, as something anyone could just sit down and do.

                      You might also see what types of cuts are easier for you to make, and going forward, adapt a pattern to your comfort level. Learn what you can from this experience, even if the end result isn't quite what you wanted. I have a number of bowls like that, that eventually led to projects that worked out very well.

                      And we're all enjoying your adventure!

                      Carole

                      Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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                      • #12
                        Quite the challenge! What saw are you using? From the Knob it looks like a Hegner. A saw like the Pegas or the EXcaliburs would not have the upper arm moving and might be a bit easier.
                        Another thought have you tried drilling the starter hole in the other end and turning the blade around to do a pull cut?

                        A very shallow cradle to stabilize the bowl while cutting might be helpful.


                        Also since you will be spending time sanding and cleaning up the cuts anyway a spiral blade be a choice. Also I would be tempted to buy one of these. https://www.amazon.com/Knew-Concepts...xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==
                        Last edited by Rolf; 05-20-2022, 08:25 AM.
                        Rolf
                        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks Carole and Rolf. I didn't do any more sawing yesterday or this morning. I have a Dewalt 788 that I just changed over to the Pegas blade clamps and will have to try it.. The upper arm on the Hegner does knock against the bowl when I have the bowl on that side of the saw. Will keep at it and see I can do to make it a little easier. Thanks.

                          Garry

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