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Birch Bark Norwegian Tine

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  • #2
    Very very nicely done Dave. I like the whole project, you did great! I am sure the couple receiving this will really like it. Thanks for sharing it with us.

    DW
    Life is hard. It is even harder when you are being stupid.
    John Wayne

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    • #3

      A very nice project.
      I like it.

      It's all fun
      Terry
      Craftsman 18"
      Delta 46-460 lathe
      ________________________

      https://www.facebook.com/SillyLillyBowsAndMore

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      • #4
        Dave, you did a supurb job on it. Beutiful piece of workmanship. Thanks for showing us.
        PERK

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        • #5
          Fantastic job! Great look! I have made about a dozen Tines in the past but none like yours.
          Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
          "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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          • #6
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              The only thing "different" in mine is that some of them I have done decoupage on instead of painting. I usually use oak because is bends so much better than most any other wood. I also use copper tacks , pounded into rivets instead of stitching.
              Attached Files
              Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
              "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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              • #8
                These are all great!!! I had never heard of them. Thank you for the education and ideas. ................. Oily
                May the wind at you back .....
                Not be from Lunch.

                Don't take life too seriously; No one gets out alive.

                Beauty is in the eye of the BEERHOLDER

                Visit My Gallery

                Oily's Gallery

                http://www.picturetrail.com/oily11

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                • #9
                  New to me... thanks!

                  Wow! I don't recall ever seeing Tine' projects before... thank you for posting those. They are beautiful. Where did y'all learn to make these?

                  Spence

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                  • #10
                    Ho lee cow.......you two guys make some "bee u tee full" projects. The only tines I've ever heard of before are on a fork.....what an educational site this is, always learning something new.
                    Thank you for sharing with us. Dave or Jim maybe Fox Chapel would be interested in your designs for a magazine project.......sure would be fun to learn from the masters. Just sayin'
                    Last edited by Wood Dog; 04-24-2012, 10:10 AM.
                    Gloria ............... Two memorable things to say in life, "Hello" for the first time, and "Good-bye" for the last.

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                    • #11
                      Tine is pronounced "tina", by the way.
                      Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
                      "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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                      • #12
                        Nicely done, both of you!
                        "Still Montana Mike"

                        "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                        Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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                        • #13
                          Jim,

                          Thank you for sharing the photos of your tiner. You are very skilled.

                          I have bent oak a few times, but prefer maple, cherry and birch. The hardest wood I have bent is hickory. Tried purple heart, would not bend.

                          I use copper tacks in tine’ I am making for rosemal and decorative painters that do not want to paint over lacing. This was the way the Shakers secured the sides of their bentwood boxes.

                          I have the instructions for lacing that I hand out when I teach tine’ making. Will post it here if you like.

                          I get a lot of favorable comments on the way lacing looks on a box. I even taught some local gourd carvers how to do it. I now see a few gourds with lacing added to their design.

                          Spence & Wood Dog,

                          I would post the basics of tine’ making in this thread if you want to learn. What I miss I am sure Jim Finn can fill in.


                           
                          J. Anderson is, without a drought, the best tine’ maker in the country. Take a look at his web site, Norwegian Tine, Scandinavian bentwood boxes and carriers - J. Anderson WoodWorks - Wood . He enters his work in fin art shows.

                          Jim told you how pronounce tine’, like the girls name Tina. Tine’ means box, so “tine’ box” would be like saying “box box“. The plural for tine’ is tiner.

                          I am no artist, but have been fortunate to find very talented people to paint my tine’, the photos are to show what a painter can do. I decorate a box with type of wood choice and wood grain.

                          Jim Finn and I practice a very old Nordic craft and are always pleased when someone shows an interest.

                          Thank you,

                          Dave
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by Harmony; 04-24-2012, 10:45 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Tine' were also new to me.
                            I must say that all the pictures posted are just terrific and a pleasure to the eye.
                            Thanks for showing me something new and beautiful. What a great way to start the day!

                            All the best,
                            Russ

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                            • #15
                              When I toured Norway,Sweeden and Denmark in 1984 I saw my first tine. We were told that the people there, long ago lived in log houses and many things they had were made of wood . When they wanted to make something look fancy they would cover up the wood grain with paint and then decorate over that with stylized flowers. I am no artist so I applied decoupage to mine or had someone else paint them for me. We, now-a-days, like to see the wood grain in objects of art but they considered that too plain. I enjoyed making tiner but found a very limited market for them, at any price, so I have not made any in years.
                              Hegner Polymax- 3,Hegner Multimax-3,
                              "No PHD, just a DD 214"

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